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First Rum Run - Update

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  • toddk63
    First of all, thanks to all the suggestions I got last week on this subject. They were all excellent. I still haven t figured out which route to go,
    Message 1 of 6 , Nov 2, 2003
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      First of all, thanks to all the suggestions I got last week on this
      subject. They were all excellent. I still haven't figured out which
      route to go, fractionate or 2x pot still?

      I did salvage the batch by watering it down to 58% and running thru a
      pot still. I kept everything to 90C for drinking and tails untill my
      water bath still just couldn't pump out any more, about 94C. I am
      very impressed with the results! It no longer has that rubbing alcohol
      after taste. Just smoooth!

      I plan on keeping half as white and I want to oak and age the other
      half. Can anybody offer any advice on the oaking process? Some say
      oak at full strength (80%) others say to water down first. What's
      right? I am using toasted oak. How much should I use and for how long?

      Thanks for all your help.

      Panela Rules!!!

      Todd K.
    • Boot
      ... Apparently the way to go is give it a while at around 55%, then a while longer at drinking strength. This will pull out the full spectrum of goodies from
      Message 2 of 6 , Nov 2, 2003
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        >Can anybody offer any advice on the oaking process? Some say
        >oak at full strength (80%) others say to water down first. What's
        >right?

        Apparently the way to go is give it a while at around 55%, then a while
        longer at drinking strength. This will pull out the full spectrum of
        goodies from the oak. I have found that a couple of weeks at each stage is
        sufficient. Three weeks each is brilliant if you can wait.

        >I am using toasted oak. How much should I use and for how long?

        Be careful. I over-oaked my first batch eventually. Someone on Tony's site
        says that you can't overdo virgin oak, but I've found that you can. Rather
        than rely on an exact prescription for what is inherently variable (i.e.
        oak surface area, etc) , keep an eye or tastebud on it, and this applies
        even more to toasted oak. I'm using home-made and toasted shavings, so take
        my proportions with a degree of suspicion -- but I used somewhere around
        two cups of oak shavings in total for 10 ltrs of final 40% volume. About
        half was virgin, the rest two grades of toasted. This is probably a bit
        excessive, but reflects my impatience to get an "aged" product quickly.
        Wouldn't have been a problem if I'd been more attentive to it and pulled
        the oak out at the right time.

        >Panela Rules!!!

        No it doesn't. It's stupid.

        Regards,

        Boot
      • Hector A. Landaeta C.
        ... Hola Todd! Think so? Try yourself next on sugar cane juice. Producing it yourself is a PITA but it¹s worth it. I had it easy when I wanted to try it
        Message 3 of 6 , Nov 3, 2003
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          On 11/2/03 2:52 PM, "toddk63" <toddk63@...> wrote:
          >
          > Panela Rules!!!

          Hola Todd!
          Think so? Try yourself next on sugar cane juice. Producing it yourself is
          a PITA but it¹s worth it. I had it easy when I wanted to try it first
          because there¹s this idiosyncratic drink in the Caribbean we call ³Jugo de
          Caña² which literally means sugar cane juice, and in small towns (even big
          cities) there¹s always a vendor around the corner. I gather you could use a
          malt mill for the same thing or some kind of sanitary press (cider press,
          perhaps). You can¹t imagine the smell and taste of it! Cachaça (or Cañina,
          as Walter says) at it¹s best. I¹ve found champagne yeast works the best
          (saccharomyces bayanus)
          Sugar cane juice, man. That¹s the one!
          Salud!
          --
          Héctor Landaeta.
          Colonia Tovar - Venezuela.



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Hector A. Landaeta C.
          ... Be careful. I over-oaked my first batch eventually. Yes! Aim exactly for this Todd, but in small quantities, preferably at 60 to 70%, to make an ³oak
          Message 4 of 6 , Nov 3, 2003
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            On 11/3/03 3:01 AM, "Boot" <mr.boot@...> wrote:
            >
            Be careful. I over-oaked my first batch eventually.

            Yes! Aim exactly for this Todd, but in small quantities, preferably at 60
            to 70%, to make an ³oak extract² you can later use to flavor your rums. The
            most effective way to obtain the full oak organoleptic spectrum is to char
            some part of your oak sawdust (works MUCH better than shavings) in your oven
            and leave some ³virgin², and use an aquarium aerating stone and pump to
            oxidize your extract while soaking the wood in the spirit. This replicates
            the ³breathing² cycle any spirit experiences during oak seasoning and, I¹ve
            found, is the only way to extract some depth and complexity. Anyway, IMO
            there¹s no substitute to the real thing (a year or two, minimum).
            Salud!
            --
            Héctor Landaeta.
            Colonia Tovar - Venezuela.



            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • flaming_pinto
            I take pieces of untreated oak trim, cut them to fit in the bottle, char them with my brazing torch, and drop them in my bottles. You would be surprised how
            Message 5 of 6 , Nov 3, 2003
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              I take pieces of untreated oak trim, cut them to fit in the bottle,
              char them with my brazing torch, and drop them in my bottles. You
              would be surprised how much oak and vanillins come out of the oak in
              just a few months. I have some corn whiskey that is only two months
              old but smells and tastes as good as any 4-8 year old on the market.

              --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Hector A. Landaeta C."
              <coloniera@c...> wrote:
              > On 11/3/03 3:01 AM, "Boot" <mr.boot@o...> wrote:
              > >
              > Be careful. I over-oaked my first batch eventually.
              >
              > Yes! Aim exactly for this Todd, but in small quantities,
              preferably at 60
              > to 70%, to make an ³oak extract² you can later use to flavor your
              rums. The
              > most effective way to obtain the full oak organoleptic spectrum is
              to char
              > some part of your oak sawdust (works MUCH better than shavings) in
              your oven
              > and leave some ³virgin², and use an aquarium aerating stone and
              pump to
              > oxidize your extract while soaking the wood in the spirit. This
              replicates
              > the ³breathing² cycle any spirit experiences during oak seasoning
              and, I¹ve
              > found, is the only way to extract some depth and complexity.
              Anyway, IMO
              > there¹s no substitute to the real thing (a year or two, minimum).
              > Salud!
              > --
              > Héctor Landaeta.
              > Colonia Tovar - Venezuela.
              >
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • waljaco
              Fermented sugarcane juice was originally called Garapa Azeda or vinho de cana . It was also called cagaca (shit, fear) as it was a drink for the African
              Message 6 of 6 , Nov 4, 2003
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                Fermented sugarcane juice was originally called 'Garapa Azeda'
                or 'vinho de cana'. It was also called 'cagaca' (shit, fear) as it
                was a drink for the African slaves. 'Cagaca' was later distilled to
                become 'cachaca'.
                http://www.muca.com.br/mc03a.htm
                http://www.muca.com.br/artigo02.htm
                http://www.salinasmg.com.br/frame9.htm
                http://www.carvalheira.com.br/a_carvalheira_hist_cachaca.html

                'Garapa' is Brazilian Portuguese.
                'Guarapo' is Venezuelan Spanish
                The Mexicans use the term 'Tepache', so 'Guarapo de pina'
                is 'Tepache'. For the Mexican recipe see -
                http://cocinamexicana.com.mx/bebidas/tepache.html

                Throwing some pineapple skins into your sugar/panela mash should give
                more interesting flavors.

                Wal

                --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Hector A. Landaeta C."
                <coloniera@c...> wrote:
                > On 11/2/03 2:52 PM, "toddk63" <toddk63@y...> wrote:
                > >
                > > Panela Rules!!!
                >
                > Hola Todd!
                > Think so? Try yourself next on sugar cane juice. Producing it
                yourself is
                > a PITA but it¹s worth it. I had it easy when I wanted to try it
                first
                > because there¹s this idiosyncratic drink in the Caribbean we call
                ³Jugo de
                > Caña² which literally means sugar cane juice, and in small towns
                (even big
                > cities) there¹s always a vendor around the corner. I gather you
                could use a
                > malt mill for the same thing or some kind of sanitary press (cider
                press,
                > perhaps). You can¹t imagine the smell and taste of it! Cachaça
                (or Cañina,
                > as Walter says) at it¹s best. I¹ve found champagne yeast works the
                best
                > (saccharomyces bayanus)
                > Sugar cane juice, man. That¹s the one!
                > Salud!
                > --
                > Héctor Landaeta.
                > Colonia Tovar - Venezuela.
                >
                >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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