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Re: [Distillers] Re: stirring while distilling

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  • Hector A. Landaeta C.
    ... Hola Harry! Seems you¹ve got the reasons for stirring wrong my friend. As I gather it, stirring serves the major purpose of eliminating temp gradients
    Message 1 of 22 , Oct 31, 2003
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      On 10/29/03 9:50 PM, "Harry" <gnikomson2000@...> wrote:

      > Fit a large stainless steel or copper strainer mesh (gauze) into the
      > boiler to keep the grains away from direct heat when you charge the
      > still. Ergo stirring not necessary.

      Hola Harry!
      Seems you¹ve got the reasons for stirring wrong my friend. As I gather it,
      stirring serves the major purpose of eliminating temp gradients within the
      mash, specially if your heat source comes from the sides and/or bottom.
      Gentle stirring should also help in transporting volatile substances (like
      alcohol) wanting out of the solution to reach the surface in order to
      evaporate, thus reducing time and increasing yield. You can still see
      handle stirrers in modern day, high-tech German stills (in the Christian
      Carl website there¹s a pretty 70 liter or so one photographed). I think
      that all the people that¹s experimenting with scorched grain taste in their
      spirits should strain them even before fermentation occurs because yeast
      can¹t ferment cellulose nor residual starch, and that¹s all that should be
      present in your spent grains after you¹ve mashed them. All of the flavor
      components that could be appreciated in the distilled spirit should be
      present in the strained (even filtered) wash. Of course, if you¹re
      fermenting pit fruits like peaches or cherries, even apples and pears I¹ve
      also found that it¹s folly no to include the stones and pits (even the
      peelings and stems) in the boiler because there is lot of remaining flavor
      and aromatic content to be extracted from them. I¹ve read something about
      traditional corn whiskey methods and the belief that ³in grain² fermenting
      causes a distinguishable different spirit from the one without. I must say
      that I¹ve never tried a corn grain wash. Did try ones with 6-row malt and a
      pre-cooked cornmeal flour that¹s ubiquitous here because we make the
      national dish (arepas) with it. Personally I prefer a single-malt or a
      rice-adjunct malt wash. I¹ve also never had the chance to experiment with
      malt grain washes with an electrically heated still but I think it could be
      that when your wash has direct contact with your heating element you should
      take more care of what you put inside the boiler.
      Salud!
      --
      Hector Landaeta.
      Colonia Tovar - Venezuela.



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