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Fruit/berry quantity for liquors & liqueurs

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  • waljaco
    In the Files section there is a Recipes collection of Distillers recipes in historical order. Students of Libation Studies will notice that ingredients
    Message 1 of 3 , Sep 24, 2003
      In the 'Files' section there is a Recipes collection of Distillers'
      recipes in historical order. Students of Libation Studies will notice
      that ingredients vary.

      There are several ways to obtain fruit/berry flavors. The quantities
      given below relate to 1 litre of alcohol, so that they can be scaled
      up:

      1) Alcohol Extraction and Redistillation.
      1.5-4 kg of fruit/berries are macerated (steeped) for several weeks
      in 1 litre of alcohol of at least 45%bv and then redistilled to
      obtain a clear flavored liquor. This can then be sweetened to make a
      clear liqueur. Also the pomace of fruit/berries can be used in a
      similar way.
      Proportion 1.5-4:1
      See msg 12540 for details.

      2) Alcohol Extraction.
      0.25-1 kg of fruit/berries are macerated in 1 litre of alcohol for
      several weeks (2 minimum). Often fruit/berry pulp is used for maximum
      extraction. This is then sweetened.
      A common recipe is 500 g fruit/berries, 1 litre of alcohol, 11/2 cups
      (300 g) sugar.
      Proportion 0.25-1:1

      3) Alcohol and Sugar Extraction.
      1 kg of fruit/berries is macerated in 1 litre of alcohol for several
      weeks and then the flavored alcohol is drained and retained. Sugar is
      then added in several stages until the fruit/berries shrivel,
      indicating that the alcohol and juice has been extracted by the
      sugar. This syrup is then used to sweeten the retained flavored
      alcohol from the first stage.
      Proportion 1:1

      4) Fermentation and Fortification.
      100-200 g of sugar is sprinkled on 1 kg of fruit/berries and allowed
      to ferment (usually 6 weeks). Then 1 litre of alcohol is added to
      arrest the fermentation and produce a liqueur strength. Extra sugar
      is added to taste.
      This is similar to the method of making a fortified wine such as port
      where after several days grape spirit is added to the fermenting must
      to arrest the fermentation but also retaining any residual sugar,
      producing a sweet wine of about 20%abv.
      Proportion 1:1
      See msg 3962 for details

      Wal
    • tipringwaterpipe
      Hi Wal Having just looked up Libation in the dictionary and thinking I may have libationary leanings, would you be so kind as to tell me your definition of
      Message 2 of 3 , Sep 26, 2003
        Hi Wal

        Having just looked up Libation in the dictionary and thinking I may have libationary leanings, would you be so kind as to tell me your definition of liqueur verses a fruit flavoured (British variant of Flavor) alcoholic beverage? You've caught my curiosity, and having read several of your posts, have great respect for knowledge in this field.
        Thanks
        Down-the-Hatch
        Tip

        waljaco <waljaco@...> wrote:
        In the 'Files' section there is a Recipes collection of Distillers'
        recipes in historical order. Students of Libation Studies will notice
        that ingredients vary.

        There are several ways to obtain fruit/berry flavors. The quantities
        given below relate to 1 litre of alcohol, so that they can be scaled
        up:

        1) Alcohol Extraction and Redistillation.
        1.5-4 kg of fruit/berries are macerated (steeped) for several weeks
        in 1 litre of alcohol of at least 45%bv and then redistilled to
        obtain a clear flavored liquor. This can then be sweetened to make a
        clear liqueur. Also the pomace of fruit/berries can be used in a
        similar way.
        Proportion 1.5-4:1
        See msg 12540 for details.

        2) Alcohol Extraction.
        0.25-1 kg of fruit/berries are macerated in 1 litre of alcohol for
        several weeks (2 minimum). Often fruit/berry pulp is used for maximum
        extraction. This is then sweetened.
        A common recipe is 500 g fruit/berries, 1 litre of alcohol, 11/2 cups
        (300 g) sugar.
        Proportion 0.25-1:1

        3) Alcohol and Sugar Extraction.
        1 kg of fruit/berries is macerated in 1 litre of alcohol for several
        weeks and then the flavored alcohol is drained and retained. Sugar is
        then added in several stages until the fruit/berries shrivel,
        indicating that the alcohol and juice has been extracted by the
        sugar. This syrup is then used to sweeten the retained flavored
        alcohol from the first stage.
        Proportion 1:1

        4) Fermentation and Fortification.
        100-200 g of sugar is sprinkled on 1 kg of fruit/berries and allowed
        to ferment (usually 6 weeks). Then 1 litre of alcohol is added to
        arrest the fermentation and produce a liqueur strength. Extra sugar
        is added to taste.
        This is similar to the method of making a fortified wine such as port
        where after several days grape spirit is added to the fermenting must
        to arrest the fermentation but also retaining any residual sugar,
        producing a sweet wine of about 20%abv.
        Proportion 1:1
        See msg 3962 for details

        Wal


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      • waljaco
        I am just learning as I bumble along and I am compiling information for my own and hopefully others benefit, so most of the knowledge/information does not
        Message 3 of 3 , Sep 28, 2003
          I am just learning as I bumble along and I am compiling information
          for my own and hopefully others' benefit, so most of the
          knowledge/information does not come from my own experience. There are
          many terms around which do not have a tight dictionary definition and
          are synonyms - cordial, liqueur, ratafia, fruit brandy (liqueur) and a
          fruit brandy (fruit flavored spirit), fruit gin (liqueur as sloe,
          damson). The E.U. has Regulations 'laying down general rules on the
          definition, description and presentation of spirit drinks' -
          http://www.europeanspirits.org
          Click on 'English'
          Click on 'Key documents'
          First 2 are relevant.

          These days some artisan vodka comes flavored with real fruit or even
          probably grape pomace - usually by maceration and redistillation -
          little sugar is added.

          Wal

          --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, tipringwaterpipe <ed_bathie@y...>
          wrote:
          > Hi Wal
          >
          > Having just looked up Libation in the dictionary and thinking I may
          have libationary leanings, would you be so kind as to tell me your
          definition of liqueur verses a fruit flavoured (British variant of
          Flavor) alcoholic beverage? You've caught my curiosity, and having
          read several of your posts, have great respect for knowledge in this
          field.
          > Thanks
          > Down-the-Hatch
          > Tip
          >
          > waljaco <waljaco@h...> wrote:
          > In the 'Files' section there is a Recipes collection of Distillers'
          > recipes in historical order. Students of Libation Studies will notice
          > that ingredients vary.
          >
          > There are several ways to obtain fruit/berry flavors. The quantities
          > given below relate to 1 litre of alcohol, so that they can be scaled
          > up:
          >
          > 1) Alcohol Extraction and Redistillation.
          > 1.5-4 kg of fruit/berries are macerated (steeped) for several weeks
          > in 1 litre of alcohol of at least 45%bv and then redistilled to
          > obtain a clear flavored liquor. This can then be sweetened to make a
          > clear liqueur. Also the pomace of fruit/berries can be used in a
          > similar way.
          > Proportion 1.5-4:1
          > See msg 12540 for details.
          >
          > 2) Alcohol Extraction.
          > 0.25-1 kg of fruit/berries are macerated in 1 litre of alcohol for
          > several weeks (2 minimum). Often fruit/berry pulp is used for maximum
          > extraction. This is then sweetened.
          > A common recipe is 500 g fruit/berries, 1 litre of alcohol, 11/2 cups
          > (300 g) sugar.
          > Proportion 0.25-1:1
          >
          > 3) Alcohol and Sugar Extraction.
          > 1 kg of fruit/berries is macerated in 1 litre of alcohol for several
          > weeks and then the flavored alcohol is drained and retained. Sugar is
          > then added in several stages until the fruit/berries shrivel,
          > indicating that the alcohol and juice has been extracted by the
          > sugar. This syrup is then used to sweeten the retained flavored
          > alcohol from the first stage.
          > Proportion 1:1
          >
          > 4) Fermentation and Fortification.
          > 100-200 g of sugar is sprinkled on 1 kg of fruit/berries and allowed
          > to ferment (usually 6 weeks). Then 1 litre of alcohol is added to
          > arrest the fermentation and produce a liqueur strength. Extra sugar
          > is added to taste.
          > This is similar to the method of making a fortified wine such as port
          > where after several days grape spirit is added to the fermenting must
          > to arrest the fermentation but also retaining any residual sugar,
          > producing a sweet wine of about 20%abv.
          > Proportion 1:1
          > See msg 3962 for details
          >
          > Wal
          >
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups SponsorADVERTISEMENT
          >
          > To unsubscribe from this group send a blank email to
          distillers-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
          > Distillers list archives : http://archive.nnytech.net/
          > FAQ and other information at http://homedistiller.org
          >
          > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.
          >
          >
          > ---------------------------------
          > Do you Yahoo!?
          > The New Yahoo! Shopping - with improved product search
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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