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Re: [Distillers] electric heating

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  • Patrick Moore
    Yes, it is very possible, and often used, I too opted for that option for a while because it was an easy, and cheap way of heating the boiler. The only problem
    Message 1 of 5 , Dec 7, 2000
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      Yes, it is very possible, and often used, I too opted for that option for a while because it was an easy, and cheap way of heating the boiler. The only problem is, it is not very efficiant. Depending on your wash size, and alcohol% you could be looking at something like 4 or more hours of heating.
      The better option is a submersible heating element!
      They can be catered to your needs, and are easy to control.
      I suggest that you invest in two elements.
      one 3000watt (3KW) element for getting your wash up to boiling point in roughly an hour.
      the other, a 1kw heater with amp control so you can manually adjust the power supply in order to keep your wash at a constant temp (it works much like a light dimmer)...they are called stepless power regulators (triac)...(or so one of my books say)!
      The books I've been reading, and other posts always say don't use a thermostat, I don't particularly know why? ...In fact I think I'll ask:

      Why am I continually told (when buying an element for distilling) not to buy one with a thermostat?...the power regulators are quite pricey, so I was wondering if there was another option?

      Regards Pat.

      Ps. I haven't got around to getting my elements yet I'm still in the market...any one have any advice?

      Pps. I hope I've been of some help, even though my knowledge is all theory I'm merely repeating books, and posts, good luck.



      >
      > Howdy "poteen" mates
      >
      > A boiler in the kitchen has a temperature control system and an
      > intern heating.
      >
      > Is it possible to use these for distilling?
      >
      > Please send me info to my pigeon-hole.
      >
      > thanx
      >
      >

      _________________________________________
      Get free email at http://mail.netnoir.net
    • Johan Hemberg
      the reason why you dont want a heater with termostat is because the boiling temperature of the mash will start at lets say 85 degrees celsius and rise to 100
      Message 2 of 5 , Dec 7, 2000
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        the reason why you dont want a heater with termostat is because the boiling temperature of the mash will start at lets say 85 degrees celsius and rise to 100 degrees as the alcohol vaporize.
        In a normal fractional distilling apparatus you always boil the mash. You don't want it to be at constant temperature.
        If you wish you can use a termostat heater but you need to turn it up to over 100 degrees and use some kind of dimmer to decrease the effect.
        Second, there is a type of heater that turns on and off in a few second interval, this kind can work if the interval is small (on an off in less then 2 seconds or so)
        If the interval is to wide the mash will boil to fast (when there is heat on) and the column will not be able to separate alcohol proberly and no alcohol will come at all when the heat is off.

        So for short, you can use whatever heatsource you want as long as the effect is constant.


        > Yes, it is very possible, and often used, I too opted for that option for a while because it was an easy, and cheap way of heating the boiler. The only problem is, it is not very efficiant. Depending on your wash size, and alcohol% you could be looking at something like 4 or more hours of heating.
        > The better option is a submersible heating element!
        > They can be catered to your needs, and are easy to control.
        > I suggest that you invest in two elements.
        > one 3000watt (3KW) element for getting your wash up to boiling point in roughly an hour.
        > the other, a 1kw heater with amp control so you can manually adjust the power supply in order to keep your wash at a constant temp
        (it works much like a light dimmer)...they are called stepless power regulators (triac)...(or so one of my books say)!
        > The books I've been reading, and other posts always say don't use a thermostat, I don't particularly know why? ...In fact I think I'll ask:
        >
        > Why am I continually told (when buying an element for distilling) not to buy one with a thermostat?...the power regulators are quite pricey, so I was wondering if there was another option?
        >
        > Regards Pat.
        >
        > Ps. I haven't got around to getting my elements yet I'm still in the market...any one have any advice?
        >
        > Pps. I hope I've been of some help, even though my knowledge is all theory I'm merely repeating books, and posts, good luck.
        >
        >
        >
        > >
        > > Howdy "poteen" mates
        > >
        > > A boiler in the kitchen has a temperature control system and an
        > > intern heating.
        > >
        > > Is it possible to use these for distilling?
        > >
        > > Please send me info to my pigeon-hole.
        > >
        > > thanx
        > >
        > >
        >
        > _________________________________________
        > Get free email at http://mail.netnoir.net
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
      • Tony & Elle Ackland
        ... buy one with a thermostat Once the wash is boiling, its temperature is governed by the amount of alcohol in it, eg a 10% wash will boil at 93 C no matter
        Message 3 of 5 , Dec 7, 2000
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          >Why am I continually told (when buying an element for distilling) not to
          buy one with a thermostat

          Once the wash is boiling, its temperature is governed by the amount of
          alcohol in it, eg a 10% wash will boil at 93 C no matter how much heat you
          apply (just like you can't boil water at hotter than 100C at atmospheric
          pressure).

          Any extra heat applied then goes into making more and more vapour

          So the problem of applying too much heat is then one of how to deal with
          the extra vapour. Ideally, your column & condensors should be sized so
          that they are matched to the maximum vapour rate able to be put out by your
          heater. However, often they aren't (eg column diameter too small, and are
          too small. This is when a thermostat/triac/dimmer is usefull - in then
          knocking back the extra power input so that the vapour rate is reduced to
          something that your column can handle

          Tony
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