Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

heat control of cooling water

Expand Messages
  • bobbafett00@hotmail.com
    I m currently running my still with a recirculating cooling system powered by an electric pump.I use a 50l plastic drum as a holding tank. I moved to this
    Message 1 of 5 , Nov 4, 2000
    • 0 Attachment
      I'm currently running my still with a recirculating cooling system
      powered by an electric pump.I use a 50l plastic drum as a holding
      tank.
      I moved to this design after my first run because of the obscene amout
      of tap water being used to stabilise the head temp. This new system
      works ok as it reduces water consumption but after about 1 hour I have
      to start emptying water out of the 50l drum because the water temp
      gradually increases and I'm worried about damaging the pump with the
      high temp. Doing this ends up using a fair bit of tap water anyway, as
      I then have to change the water every hour or so to keep the temp
      down.
      So my question is has anyone out there figured a reliable way of
      keeping your water temp cool (recirculating) without constant
      monitoring?
      thanks all
      Scott
    • gbking
      ... How about filling your tank with a ice cube/water mix to start with and/or adding ice instead of water as the temp rises. Graeme
      Message 2 of 5 , Nov 5, 2000
      • 0 Attachment
        bobbafett00@... wrote:
        >
        >
        > So my question is has anyone out there figured a reliable way of
        > keeping your water temp cool (recirculating) without constant
        > monitoring?
        > thanks all
        > Scott
        >
        How about filling your tank with a ice cube/water mix to start with
        and/or adding ice instead of water as the temp rises.
        Graeme
      • D. C.
        I m not sure
        Message 3 of 5 , Nov 5, 2000
        • 0 Attachment
          << So my question is has anyone out there figured a reliable way of
          keeping your water temp cool (recirculating) without constant
          monitoring? >>

          I'm not sure if this method is economical, reliable, or without constant
          monitoring, but I thought that I'd post it any way. A friend of mine has one
          of those "lay down" freezers (you know, the ones that look like a
          refrigerator laying on their back?) and made some modifications to it.

          On the front (the long side facing you if you were to walk up to it) and
          about 3/4 down from the top (the lid) a hole was drilled into the freezer
          and a faucet was installed for drainage purposes. On one of the ends, there
          is a hole drilled though (3/4 of the way down from the top) and a tube is
          ran through it and sealed. That tube is connected to the submersible pump
          inside of the freezer. On the opposite end there is a hole with a sealed
          tube 1/4 of the way down from the top which is used for the condenser drain
          tube from the still.

          The night before the run, he plugs the freezer in the electrical outlet and
          lets it run all night. On mornings of a run, and in the afternoon, my friend
          goes to three different fast food restaurants and get several coolers filled
          with free ice. Once back at home he just lets the ice sit in the coolers
          until needed.

          When the run starts, the freezer is filled 5/8 of the way full of water and
          then he fills the rest of the space with the free ice cubes from the local
          fast food restaurants. The power cord of the pump hangs out the top of the
          freezer and when the lid of the freezer is shut, the seal around the lid
          forms around the power cord of the pump.

          After about an hour or so, the drain on the front of the freezer is opened
          just a crack to let just a fine stream of water trickles out. About every
          hour or two new ice is put into the freezer and some water added as needed.

          He swears by this method of cooling his condenser and his spirits are of
          very good quality.

          - D. C. -
        • Tony & Elle Ackland
          Scott, One method is to freeze 2L drink bottles full of water, then put these into your holding tank as needed when it starts heating up. Tony
          Message 4 of 5 , Nov 5, 2000
          • 0 Attachment
            Scott,

            One method is to freeze 2L drink bottles full of water, then put these into your holding tank as needed when it starts heating up.

            Tony
          • Ted Palmer
            The only way to reduce the amount of water that you are using is to have the most efficient heat exchange system that is possible. For home distillers the
            Message 5 of 5 , Nov 5, 2000
            • 0 Attachment
              The only way to reduce the amount of water that you are using is to have the
              most efficient heat exchange system that is possible. For home distillers
              the counter-flow condenser is the cheapest route. Use 3/8" copper tubing
              inside of garden hose, you can find plans for these on many homebrew web
              sites. when you run the condencer let just a trickle of water run through
              it, the bottom coil should be cool to the touch and it should be hot 3 or 4
              coils up, if it is cool all the way up you are pushing wat to much water
              through. A 20' long coil should use produce only 16 to 20 liters of hot
              water in an hour, good for cleaning or making the next batch.
              Ted Palmer
              tpalmer@...

              ----- Original Message -----
              From: <bobbafett00@...>
              To: <Distillers@egroups.com>
              Sent: Saturday, November 04, 2000 11:58 PM
              Subject: [Distillers] heat control of cooling water


              > I'm currently running my still with a recirculating cooling system
              > powered by an electric pump.I use a 50l plastic drum as a holding
              > tank.
              > I moved to this design after my first run because of the obscene amout
              > of tap water being used to stabilise the head temp. This new system
              > works ok as it reduces water consumption but after about 1 hour I have
              > to start emptying water out of the 50l drum because the water temp
              > gradually increases and I'm worried about damaging the pump with the
              > high temp. Doing this ends up using a fair bit of tap water anyway, as
              > I then have to change the water every hour or so to keep the temp
              > down.
              > So my question is has anyone out there figured a reliable way of
              > keeping your water temp cool (recirculating) without constant
              > monitoring?
              > thanks all
              > Scott
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.