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Re: [Distillers] fruit: use sugar or not?

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  • Hector A. Landaeta C.
    ... Hola! I wanted to add something of my own to this question. Being very fond of schnapps I¹ve found that even taking a brewers (read Freudian anal) care
    Message 1 of 5 , Jun 11, 2003
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      Re: [Distillers] fruit: use sugar or not? On 11/6/03 1:19 PM, "rabotene" <rabotene@...> wrote:

      Hello everyone,

      I want someone to confirm if there is a taste/quality difference when
      the wash is purely from fruit (in Bulgaria they use plums, apples,
      apricots, or mixture), vs added sugar to the fruit mass?

      My father distills for 22 years, and claims there is no detectable
      difference. He always uses as much sugar as fruit and says 1kg sugar
      gives 1L rakia (distilled spirit at 42).

      Hola!
      I wanted to add something of my own to this question.  Being very fond of schnapps I’ve found that even taking a brewers (read Freudian anal) care in the fermentation of any fruit from the lot I’ve tried so far (that I remember, apricots, blackberries, apples, bananas, strawberries, pineapples, mangoes, papayas, of course grapes and several other Amazonian fruits only available hereabouts), the combination of low alcoholic yield and low desirable flavor threshold made me retort to a practice that I (and I think many other quite as impatient) could find useful.  I limited my for-alcohol wash ingredients to malt and molasses, spirits which I usually purify to 94-95% (and even carbon filter sometimes) for this purpose, and use this alcohol to dehydrate the fruits.  This extraction takes normally around 2 to 4 days (more than half the fruit fermenting time) and then carefully redistill this extract in an pot still.  This new distillate has a so much fresh and true to origin taste that some connoisseurs have told me that there’s no resemblance in some to what a true schnapps should taste! (one even scolded me for cheating in using artificial extracts).  Have any of you tried this?  I haven’t read about it anywhere but I didn’t invent it either. A pharmacologist told me that was the way many a vegetable source extract was obtained and I first read about it as a bread and butter perfumist resource in Süskind’s novel “The Perfume”.
      This way I reserve the (10 times more expensive than molasses here) refined sugar to make some cordials with the first fruit extract (previously finely filtered).  Try some grape ethylic extract next time you have some of both lying around the house.  I’ve found that the less water the to be extracted fruit (or herb, or spice for that matter) has the lower the purity of alcohol you must use to be equally effective.
      Salud!
      --
      Héctor Landaeta.
      Colonia Tovar - Venezuela.
    • waljaco
      In France they only macerate berry fruits (which are low in fermentable sugars) in alcohol and then redistill to obtain berry eaux-des-vies . Even adding
      Message 2 of 5 , Jun 11, 2003
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        In France they only macerate berry fruits (which are low in
        fermentable sugars) in alcohol and then redistill to obtain
        berry 'eaux-des-vies'.
        Even adding fresh fruit to a normal fermented out fruit wash sounds
        like a good idea - so as to increase the fruit flavour, especially as
        some fruits do not have much character.
        Wal

        --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Hector A. Landaeta C."
        <coloniera@c...> wrote:
        > On 11/6/03 1:19 PM, "rabotene" <rabotene@y...> wrote:
        >
        > > Hello everyone,
        > >
        > > I want someone to confirm if there is a taste/quality difference
        when
        > > the wash is purely from fruit (in Bulgaria they use plums, apples,
        > > apricots, or mixture), vs added sugar to the fruit mass?
        > >
        > > My father distills for 22 years, and claims there is no detectable
        > > difference. He always uses as much sugar as fruit and says 1kg
        sugar
        > > gives 1L rakia (distilled spirit at 42).
        > >
        > Hola!
        > I wanted to add something of my own to this question. Being very
        fond of
        > schnapps I¹ve found that even taking a brewers (read Freudian anal)
        care in
        > the fermentation of any fruit from the lot I¹ve tried so far (that I
        > remember, apricots, blackberries, apples, bananas, strawberries,
        pineapples,
        > mangoes, papayas, of course grapes and several other Amazonian
        fruits only
        > available hereabouts), the combination of low alcoholic yield and
        low
        > desirable flavor threshold made me retort to a practice that I (and
        I think
        > many other quite as impatient) could find useful. I limited my for-
        alcohol
        > wash ingredients to malt and molasses, spirits which I usually
        purify to
        > 94-95% (and even carbon filter sometimes) for this purpose, and use
        this
        > alcohol to dehydrate the fruits. This extraction takes normally
        around 2 to
        > 4 days (more than half the fruit fermenting time) and then carefully
        > redistill this extract in an pot still. This new distillate has a
        so much
        > fresh and true to origin taste that some connoisseurs have told me
        that
        > there¹s no resemblance in some to what a true schnapps should
        taste! (one
        > even scolded me for cheating in using artificial extracts). Have
        any of you
        > tried this? I haven¹t read about it anywhere but I didn¹t invent
        it either.
        > A pharmacologist told me that was the way many a vegetable source
        extract
        > was obtained and I first read about it as a bread and butter
        perfumist
        > resource in Süskind¹s novel ³The Perfume².
        > This way I reserve the (10 times more expensive than molasses here)
        refined
        > sugar to make some cordials with the first fruit extract
        (previously finely
        > filtered). Try some grape ethylic extract next time you have some
        of both
        > lying around the house. I¹ve found that the less water the to be
        extracted
        > fruit (or herb, or spice for that matter) has the lower the purity
        of
        > alcohol you must use to be equally effective.
        > Salud!
        > --
        > Héctor Landaeta.
        > Colonia Tovar - Venezuela.
      • waljaco
        See msg 6274, article on Rupf and St. George distillery This deals with fruit infused vodkas: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Distillers/message/6274 Wal ...
        Message 3 of 5 , Jun 11, 2003
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          See msg 6274, 'article on Rupf and St. George distillery'
          This deals with fruit infused vodkas:
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Distillers/message/6274

          Wal

          --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Hector A. Landaeta C."
          <coloniera@c...> wrote:
          > On 11/6/03 1:19 PM, "rabotene" <rabotene@y...> wrote:
          >
          > > Hello everyone,
          > >
          > > I want someone to confirm if there is a taste/quality difference
          when
          > > the wash is purely from fruit (in Bulgaria they use plums, apples,
          > > apricots, or mixture), vs added sugar to the fruit mass?
          > >
          > > My father distills for 22 years, and claims there is no detectable
          > > difference. He always uses as much sugar as fruit and says 1kg
          sugar
          > > gives 1L rakia (distilled spirit at 42).
          > >
          > Hola!
          > I wanted to add something of my own to this question. Being very
          fond of
          > schnapps I¹ve found that even taking a brewers (read Freudian anal)
          care in
          > the fermentation of any fruit from the lot I¹ve tried so far (that I
          > remember, apricots, blackberries, apples, bananas, strawberries,
          pineapples,
          > mangoes, papayas, of course grapes and several other Amazonian
          fruits only
          > available hereabouts), the combination of low alcoholic yield and
          low
          > desirable flavor threshold made me retort to a practice that I (and
          I think
          > many other quite as impatient) could find useful. I limited my for-
          alcohol
          > wash ingredients to malt and molasses, spirits which I usually
          purify to
          > 94-95% (and even carbon filter sometimes) for this purpose, and use
          this
          > alcohol to dehydrate the fruits. This extraction takes normally
          around 2 to
          > 4 days (more than half the fruit fermenting time) and then carefully
          > redistill this extract in an pot still. This new distillate has a
          so much
          > fresh and true to origin taste that some connoisseurs have told me
          that
          > there¹s no resemblance in some to what a true schnapps should
          taste! (one
          > even scolded me for cheating in using artificial extracts). Have
          any of you
          > tried this? I haven¹t read about it anywhere but I didn¹t invent
          it either.
          > A pharmacologist told me that was the way many a vegetable source
          extract
          > was obtained and I first read about it as a bread and butter
          perfumist
          > resource in Süskind¹s novel ³The Perfume².
          > This way I reserve the (10 times more expensive than molasses here)
          refined
          > sugar to make some cordials with the first fruit extract
          (previously finely
          > filtered). Try some grape ethylic extract next time you have some
          of both
          > lying around the house. I¹ve found that the less water the to be
          extracted
          > fruit (or herb, or spice for that matter) has the lower the purity
          of
          > alcohol you must use to be equally effective.
          > Salud!
          > --
          > Héctor Landaeta.
          > Colonia Tovar - Venezuela.
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