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Re: Mastic Liqueur ( mastika, masticha, mastikha, mastiha)

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  • waljaco
    For those who like a liqueur that tastes somewhat like pleasant violin varnish, some additional information on mastic gum/resin. I did not find that it tasted
    Message 1 of 2 , Jun 1 7:07 PM
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      For those who like a liqueur that tastes somewhat like pleasant
      violin varnish, some additional information on mastic gum/resin. I
      did not find that it tasted like licorice as suggested by one
      reference.

      Chios mastic gum is insoluble in water but partly soluble in alcohol.
      An essential oil is produced by steam distillation of the actual
      resin or occasionally directly from the leaves and branches. .
      Suspending a bag with the mastic resin in the still boiler would
      achieve a similar effect. The essential oil yield appears to be about
      2%.
      Sometimes the berries are used for making sweets or liqueurs (French
      reference).
      Mastic has a melting point of 105 to 120C which explains how it is
      used in the recipe below for the Masticha (Mastic Fondant) where the
      powdered gum is added to the thick hot sugar syrup, which is then
      beaten until it turns white.
      To make a mastic essence for use as a flavoring, place powdered
      mastic gum in pure alcohol, stirring daily until it no longer sticks
      to the bottom which may take several weeks.
      For medicinal purposes (ulcers) a daily dose of 1 gram (1/2tsp) is
      recommended.
      Wal


      --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@h...> wrote:
      > I came across reference to the use of mastic gum (from Pistacia
      > lentiscus)as a flavoring in Greece (Masticha ouzo, Chios Masticha
      > liqueur, Mastic liqueur of Kalamata), and Bulgaria (Mastika). The
      > liquorice-flavored resin is found only on the Greek island of Chios
      > and is used in the Middle East as a spice, a chewing gum and having
      > anti-bacterial properties, as a medicine for stomach ailments.
      Often
      > Chios mastic gum is part of the botanicals for ouzo, or it can be
      > crushed and added to the distillate later.
      > I have not come across any recipes, but a reference mentions Mastic
      > Liqueur as being a Greek brandy based liqueur that is flavored with
      > mastic. There is a non-alcoholic Greek Mastic Syrup
      > (ipovrichio/hypovrychio) which can be used as a basis of
      formulating
      > a mastic liqueur:
      > Ipovrichio
      > 4 cups water
      > 2 cups sugar
      > juice 1/2 lemon
      > 1 beaten egg white (used to clarify the boiling syrup)
      > 21/2 tsp. Chios mastic gum
      > The mastic gum is crushed with 1/2 tsp sugar and added to the
      > lukewarm syrup. We can modify this for my interpretation of a
      Mastic
      > Liqueur and Mastic Ouzo using a raw spirit or brandy and ouzo/raki:
      >
      > Mastic Liqueur
      > 3 cups alcohol (40%bv)
      > 1 cup water
      > 1-11/2 cups sugar
      > juice 1/2 lemon
      > 21/2 tsp crushed Chios mastic gum
      >
      > Mastic Ouzo/Raki
      > 750 ml ouzo/raki (or flavor vodka with 1 tbsp whole aniseed)
      > 2 tsp Chios mastic gum
      > 1-2 tsp sugar
      > Crush mastic gum with sugar and add to alcohol
      >
      > Wal
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