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SV: [Distillers] Re: Saving power

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  • Johan
    Let’s say that we have no reflux, then vapours travels through the column and nothing happens. If we have little reflux: In the still the reflux meets warmer
    Message 1 of 9 , Jun 1, 2003
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      Let’s say that we have no reflux, then vapours travels through the column and nothing happens.

       

      If we have little reflux:

      In the still the reflux meets warmer vapour from the lower part of the column, this makes the reflux boil and is leaving a stronger alcohol content in the vapour that travels upwards and meets more reflux. But if we have little reflux, the alcohol content will decrease quickly in the reflux so the alcohol in the vapour won’t be much stronger.

       

      If we have plenty of reflux, every theoretical bottom in the still will act close to a pot still since the percentage in the reflux wont decrease much.

       

      But lowering the power will maybe increase the efficiency of the packing and that will give you more theoretical bottoms in the still that compensates for lower relux ratio. The question is how much better the packing performs. Still another reason to test different power input in a short still.

       

      It’s actually not that tricky to calculate the approximate alcohol content on every bottom in the still, at least if the still have physical bottoms, but if we approximate a theoretical bottom with scrubbers to 10 cm then

       

      Johan

       

       

       

      -----Ursprungligt meddelande-----
      Från: BOKAKOB [mailto:
      bokakob@...]
      Skickat: den 1 juni 2003 19:47
      Till: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
      Ämne: Re: [Distillers] Re: Saving power

       

      what happens if it is just ideal conditions and there is no need for reflux? if vapors travel up the column and achieve refinement without reflux, why is it impossible?

      rodmacd2000 <rmacdoug@...> wrote:

      ... (snip) but to get a 95% pure output you must be run under a reasonably high
      reflux ratio (typically 10:1) and therefore your actual product
      output will be something like 70 ml/hour.

       

      I can be wrong I must say
      Cheers, Alex...

      A


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    • rodmacd2000
      Ideal conditions refers to the assumption that the boiler and column are so well insulated that there is no heat loss from them. This doesn t negate the
      Message 2 of 9 , Jun 2, 2003
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        "Ideal conditions" refers to the assumption that the boiler and
        column are so well insulated that there is no heat loss from them.
        This doesn't negate the necessity for a packed column and a large
        percentage of distillate (reflux) being returned to filter down thru
        the packing.

        If this is not done then the still simply operates as a pot skill (no
        matter how well insulated) and therefore cannot attain a purity even
        approaching 95-96%

        --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, BOKAKOB <bokakob@y...> wrote:
        > what happens if it is just ideal conditions and there is no need
        for reflux? if vapors travel up the column and achieve refinement
        without reflux, why is it impossible?
        >
        > rodmacd2000 <rmacdoug@s...> wrote:... (snip) but to get a 95% pure
        output you must be run under a reasonably high
        > reflux ratio (typically 10:1) and therefore your actual product
        > output will be something like 70 ml/hour.
        >
        >
        >
        > I can be wrong I must say
        > Cheers, Alex...
        > A
        >
        >
        > ---------------------------------
        > Do you Yahoo!?
        > Free online calendar with sync to Outlook(TM).
      • BOKAKOB
        I agree with that. However, if the temperature gradient ends at the top of the packed column and does not extend in the condenser area (imagine a cristmass
        Message 3 of 9 , Jun 2, 2003
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          I agree with that. However, if the temperature gradient ends at the top of the packed column and does not extend in the condenser area (imagine a cristmass tree diagram of heat input, ending at the top of the column), the reflux is happening below the take-off point. In this case it is possible to adjust power, so only distillate fractions which boil above the take-off point condense and get removed. The output will depend on the ability of the packed column below to reflux/return the vapor/liquid mixture. It means that a narrow column will provide much less output compared with the wide column. I personally had a case when adjusting heat of the burner I was able to stop distillate dripping when temperature rose above 79-80 degrees. It just stopped. When I increased the heat level the temperature creaped up and distillate started to condense again but with additives of tails.

          rodmacd2000 <rmacdoug@...> wrote:

          "Ideal conditions" refers to the assumption that the boiler and column are so well insulated that there is no heat loss from them. This doesn't negate the necessity for a packed column and a large percentage of distillate (reflux) being returned to filter down thru the packing. If this is not done then the still simply operates as a pot skill (no matter how well insulated) and therefore cannot attain a purity even approaching 95-96%



          I can be wrong I must say
          Cheers, Alex...
          A


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