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clarity problems

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  • ups474@aol.com
    I have a question I was hoping I could get help with here. Imagine you have a 5 gallon still (pressure cooker), with copper lines that lead into a one quart
    Message 1 of 4 , Sep 30, 2000
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      I have a question I was hoping I could get help with here. Imagine
      you have a 5 gallon still (pressure cooker), with copper lines that
      lead into a one quart canning jar, which then leads to a 5 gallon
      bucket with 15 or so feet of copper tubing in it. You have put a
      molasses based mash in the freezer to "freeze distill" it from a 10%,
      5 gallon batch to about 18%, 2.5 gallon batch. You then put some of
      the mash in the jar "thumper", and pour the rest in the still.
      Starting the run on an electric stovetopyou collect 200ml of heads
      which are thrown out, and you begin collecting the rum. The problem
      is the rum is coming out of the still with a deep yellow/brown tint
      to it even though the condenser and still are clean and there is no
      remaining sugar to buurn in the mash. What caused the color and can
      a small amount of activated carbon remove it (the loss of some of the
      flavor is O.K.)??? Proof, temperature, and everything else was fine,
      it just was colored like it had been oak aged when it poured out of
      the condensor. Any help would be appreciated.
    • Ted Palmer
      If you used bleach or any other high PH cleaner, the inside of the copper tubing will corrode and give off dark colors. If you weren t using corroding cleaners
      Message 2 of 4 , Sep 30, 2000
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        If you used bleach or any other high PH cleaner, the inside of the copper
        tubing will corrode and give off dark colors. If you weren't using corroding
        cleaners then your not as clean as you think you are. The best cleaner for
        copper tubing is mild acid like phosphoric or nitric acid. Run a gallon of
        5% acid though it about 10 times and rinse with 2 gallons water.
        Ted Palmer
        tpalmer@...

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: <ups474@...>
        To: <Distillers@egroups.com>
        Sent: Saturday, September 30, 2000 3:29 PM
        Subject: [Distillers] clarity problems


        > I have a question I was hoping I could get help with here. Imagine
        > you have a 5 gallon still (pressure cooker), with copper lines that
        > lead into a one quart canning jar, which then leads to a 5 gallon
        > bucket with 15 or so feet of copper tubing in it. You have put a
        > molasses based mash in the freezer to "freeze distill" it from a 10%,
        > 5 gallon batch to about 18%, 2.5 gallon batch. You then put some of
        > the mash in the jar "thumper", and pour the rest in the still.
        > Starting the run on an electric stovetopyou collect 200ml of heads
        > which are thrown out, and you begin collecting the rum. The problem
        > is the rum is coming out of the still with a deep yellow/brown tint
        > to it even though the condenser and still are clean and there is no
        > remaining sugar to buurn in the mash. What caused the color and can
        > a small amount of activated carbon remove it (the loss of some of the
        > flavor is O.K.)??? Proof, temperature, and everything else was fine,
        > it just was colored like it had been oak aged when it poured out of
        > the condensor. Any help would be appreciated.
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
      • Pete Sayers
        I still cant see any advantage in using copper ANYWHERE near a still. Yes i know that our forefathers used it, but haven t we come a wee way since then. The
        Message 3 of 4 , Oct 1, 2000
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          I still cant see any advantage in using copper ANYWHERE near a still. Yes i
          know that our forefathers used it, but haven't we come a wee way since then.
          The safest metal to use is Food Grade Stainless. It doesn't require acids to
          clean it and is virtually maintainance free. It's just a bit more difficult
          to work with is all. Regards Pete from Brewers barn

          -----Original Message-----
          From: Ted Palmer [mailto:tpalmer@...]
          Sent: Sunday, 1 October 2000 11:55
          To: Distillers@egroups.com
          Subject: Re: [Distillers] clarity problems


          If you used bleach or any other high PH cleaner, the inside of the copper
          tubing will corrode and give off dark colors. If you weren't using corroding
          cleaners then your not as clean as you think you are. The best cleaner for
          copper tubing is mild acid like phosphoric or nitric acid. Run a gallon of
          5% acid though it about 10 times and rinse with 2 gallons water.
          Ted Palmer
          tpalmer@...

          ----- Original Message -----
          From: <ups474@...>
          To: <Distillers@egroups.com>
          Sent: Saturday, September 30, 2000 3:29 PM
          Subject: [Distillers] clarity problems


          > I have a question I was hoping I could get help with here. Imagine
          > you have a 5 gallon still (pressure cooker), with copper lines that
          > lead into a one quart canning jar, which then leads to a 5 gallon
          > bucket with 15 or so feet of copper tubing in it. You have put a
          > molasses based mash in the freezer to "freeze distill" it from a 10%,
          > 5 gallon batch to about 18%, 2.5 gallon batch. You then put some of
          > the mash in the jar "thumper", and pour the rest in the still.
          > Starting the run on an electric stovetopyou collect 200ml of heads
          > which are thrown out, and you begin collecting the rum. The problem
          > is the rum is coming out of the still with a deep yellow/brown tint
          > to it even though the condenser and still are clean and there is no
          > remaining sugar to buurn in the mash. What caused the color and can
          > a small amount of activated carbon remove it (the loss of some of the
          > flavor is O.K.)??? Proof, temperature, and everything else was fine,
          > it just was colored like it had been oak aged when it poured out of
          > the condensor. Any help would be appreciated.
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
        • Pete Sayers
          Hi ups Pete from Brewers Barn here. Yes the colour should come out with the use of a carbon. If you want the rum colour you will have to use a colourant ie a
          Message 4 of 4 , Oct 1, 2000
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            Hi ups Pete from Brewers Barn here. Yes the colour should come out with the
            use of a carbon. If you want the rum colour you will have to use a colourant
            ie a caramelled sugar or something
            regards Pete

            -----Original Message-----
            From: ups474@... [mailto:ups474@...]
            Sent: Sunday, 1 October 2000 11:30
            To: Distillers@egroups.com
            Subject: [Distillers] clarity problems


            I have a question I was hoping I could get help with here. Imagine
            you have a 5 gallon still (pressure cooker), with copper lines that
            lead into a one quart canning jar, which then leads to a 5 gallon
            bucket with 15 or so feet of copper tubing in it. You have put a
            molasses based mash in the freezer to "freeze distill" it from a 10%,
            5 gallon batch to about 18%, 2.5 gallon batch. You then put some of
            the mash in the jar "thumper", and pour the rest in the still.
            Starting the run on an electric stovetopyou collect 200ml of heads
            which are thrown out, and you begin collecting the rum. The problem
            is the rum is coming out of the still with a deep yellow/brown tint
            to it even though the condenser and still are clean and there is no
            remaining sugar to buurn in the mash. What caused the color and can
            a small amount of activated carbon remove it (the loss of some of the
            flavor is O.K.)??? Proof, temperature, and everything else was fine,
            it just was colored like it had been oak aged when it poured out of
            the condensor. Any help would be appreciated.
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