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Alcohol yield

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  • waljaco
    The alcohol content of your wash can be worked out even if you do not use a hydrometer. I have condensed some information from 1)
    Message 1 of 2 , Apr 30, 2003
      The alcohol content of your wash can be worked out even if you do not
      use a hydrometer. I have condensed some information from
      1) http://www.nysaes.cornell.edu/fst/faculty/acree/fs430/lectures/
      thk29yield.html
      2) http://listproc.ucdavis.edu/archives/ven3xd/log9911/0000.html
      3) The Compleat Distiller, M.Nixon & M.McCaw

      In 1810 Guy Lussac proposed a formula for alcohol yield showing that
      the chemical conversion of sugar produces 51.1% ethanol by weight.
      Alcohol is normally based on volume and as the SG of alcohol is
      0.7893, the yield by volume is 64.7%.
      This is a theoretical yield, the actual observed yield is 47% by
      weight or 59.5% by volume.
      100g/litre sugar solution yields 5.95%abv (59.5/1000x100)
      so a 17g/l sugar solution yields 1%abv (100/5.95 = 17)
      So to work out how much sugar we need to produce a certain alcohol %
      abv we use the formula -
      g/l sugar = 17 x %abv (or %abv = g/l divided by 17)
      e.g. if we want the maximum fermentable sugar for a s. bayanus yeast
      which is capable of 18% we need 17 x 18 = 306g/l of sugar.
      The amount of sugar for larger volumes is worked out using -
      W = 17 x %abv x V
      e.g. For a 20litre volume fermenter we need 20x17x18=6120g or 6kg.

      Wal
    • June Whitney
      Thanks very much. So back to my original post. 340 g/L, 20% abv potential, and initial sg 1.149. Final sg @ 20 abv approximately 0.958. Delta is 191
      Message 2 of 2 , May 4, 2003
        Thanks very much.
         
        So back to my original post.  340 g/L, 20% abv potential, and initial sg 1.149.  Final sg @ 20 abv approximately 0.958.  Delta is 191 degrees, 191/20 = 9.55.  The hydrometer usefull if you don't actually metabolize all of the sugar, and the content of sugar by weight for this case I gave earlier.
         
        Bob
        -----Original Message-----
        From: waljaco [mailto:waljaco@...]
        Sent: Wednesday, April 30, 2003 10:20 PM
        To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [Distillers] Alcohol yield

        The alcohol content of your wash can be worked out even if you do not
        use a hydrometer. I have condensed some information from
        1) http://www.nysaes.cornell.edu/fst/faculty/acree/fs430/lectures/
        thk29yield.html
        2) http://listproc.ucdavis.edu/archives/ven3xd/log9911/0000.html
        3) The Compleat Distiller, M.Nixon & M.McCaw

        In 1810 Guy Lussac proposed a formula for alcohol yield showing that
        the chemical conversion of sugar produces 51.1% ethanol by weight.
        Alcohol is normally based on volume and as the SG of alcohol is
        0.7893, the yield by volume is 64.7%.
        This is a theoretical yield, the actual observed yield is 47% by
        weight or 59.5% by volume.
        100g/litre sugar solution yields 5.95%abv (59.5/1000x100)
        so a 17g/l sugar solution yields 1%abv (100/5.95 = 17)
        So to work out how much sugar we need to produce a certain alcohol %
        abv we use the formula -
        g/l sugar = 17 x %abv (or %abv = g/l divided by 17)
        e.g. if we want the maximum fermentable sugar for a s. bayanus yeast
        which is capable of 18% we need 17 x 18 = 306g/l of sugar.
        The amount of sugar for larger volumes is worked out using -
        W = 17 x %abv x V
        e.g. For a 20litre volume fermenter we need 20x17x18=6120g or 6kg.

        Wal






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