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Grappa advice

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  • Andrew
    Howdy all- I m new to this group and browsing through some old posts I very happy to have found you. I have a new still which I m still getting a feel for, but
    Message 1 of 2 , Sep 27, 2000
      Howdy all-

      I'm new to this group and browsing through some old posts I very
      happy
      to have found you. I have a new still which I'm still getting a feel
      for, but so far has worked very nicely. It's a bit slow but that's my
      fault for having a small diameter coloumn.

      But onto the topic at hand: I have a friend who is very interested
      in
      trying to make Grappa with me, and has access to wineries and their
      harvest left-overs. I am looking for any advice and/or receipes
      anyone out their can offer. I would welcome advice on pretty much all
      aspects of this unique liquor.

      What do people really ferment? is it truely the left over skins and
      such? is there enough sugar left in them to ferment? any wories about
      stems and seeds and methanol production?

      I was not planning on using any filtering carbon on my distilate,
      since I don't want to remove the "grappa" essence, but I'm not real
      clear on where/when in the distillation that essence will come off,
      and more importantly, where it stops coming off so that I have as
      little of any other nasties as possible. Any tricks of the trade or
      more general advice on non-filtered distallates would be great. I had
      very good luck in the past with another still I owned making rum from
      a pure molasses mash, a short oak aging, and a very small amount of
      carmalized sugar for coloring. Time in the bottle helped tremendously
      and some of my friends still swear it's the best rum they've ever had.

      Thanks in advance to all you grappa lovers out there (persoanlly I
      think you're nuts 'cuz the stuff tastes awful) my grappa loving buddy
      will thank you as well, and perhaps I'll even become a convert myself
      if it turns out well enough.
      -Andrew
    • Ted Palmer
      Hi Andrew, Grappa is not for newbies! You sound like you have some experience though. Yes, there is some sugar left in the skins albeit a small amount. Don t
      Message 2 of 2 , Sep 28, 2000
        Hi Andrew,
        Grappa is not for newbies! You sound like you have some experience
        though. Yes, there is some sugar left in the skins albeit a small amount.
        Don't be tempted to add tons of sugar to push up the alcohol content, all
        you'll end up doing is loosing flavor. Let's talk safety, methanol kills,
        that said, the best way to get rid of the stuff is to double or tripple
        distill through a thumper(doubler, bubbler, whatever you want to call it)
        filled with water not tails or wash. the reason for using water is that
        methanol is hydrophylic and has a tendancy to stay put as long as the
        temperature doesn't get to high. you'll want to change out the water(use
        hot) after the first liter of heads are collected. The best grappa I ever
        had was aged in a sherry cask.
        Good luck,
        _________________________
        Ted Palmer
        tpalmer@...
        brewer@...


        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "Andrew " <physkid@...>
        To: <Distillers@egroups.com>
        Sent: Wednesday, September 27, 2000 5:29 PM
        Subject: [Distillers] Grappa advice


        > Howdy all-
        >
        > I'm new to this group and browsing through some old posts I very
        > happy
        > to have found you. I have a new still which I'm still getting a feel
        > for, but so far has worked very nicely. It's a bit slow but that's my
        > fault for having a small diameter coloumn.
        >
        > But onto the topic at hand: I have a friend who is very interested
        > in
        > trying to make Grappa with me, and has access to wineries and their
        > harvest left-overs. I am looking for any advice and/or receipes
        > anyone out their can offer. I would welcome advice on pretty much all
        > aspects of this unique liquor.
        >
        > What do people really ferment? is it truely the left over skins and
        > such? is there enough sugar left in them to ferment? any wories about
        > stems and seeds and methanol production?
        >
        > I was not planning on using any filtering carbon on my distilate,
        > since I don't want to remove the "grappa" essence, but I'm not real
        > clear on where/when in the distillation that essence will come off,
        > and more importantly, where it stops coming off so that I have as
        > little of any other nasties as possible. Any tricks of the trade or
        > more general advice on non-filtered distallates would be great. I had
        > very good luck in the past with another still I owned making rum from
        > a pure molasses mash, a short oak aging, and a very small amount of
        > carmalized sugar for coloring. Time in the bottle helped tremendously
        > and some of my friends still swear it's the best rum they've ever had.
        >
        > Thanks in advance to all you grappa lovers out there (persoanlly I
        > think you're nuts 'cuz the stuff tastes awful) my grappa loving buddy
        > will thank you as well, and perhaps I'll even become a convert myself
        > if it turns out well enough.
        > -Andrew
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
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