Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [distillers] Stills

Expand Messages
  • Des
    The Coffey Still (also know as the Patent Still) was invented in 1830 by Mr Aeneas Coffey, a retired government Excise man in Ireland. This Patent Still was
    Message 1 of 2 , Sep 14, 1999
    • 0 Attachment
      The Coffey Still (also know as the Patent Still) was invented in 1830 by Mr
      Aeneas Coffey, a retired government Excise man in Ireland. This Patent
      Still was itself an improvement on an earlier still design.
      Back to the original question: One of the major differences between the Pot
      Still and the Coffey Still is that the former is a batch still in that it
      produces alcohol in batches, whereas the Coffey Still is a continuous
      operation still.

      At 13:43 14/09/99 +1200, you wrote:
      >From: distillers@onelist.com
      >
      >Mike/Connie
      >I had heard the term Coffey still without ever knowing exactly what it
      >was. It was my understanding that the major difference in still design
      >was a pot still or a reflux which is as you say also known as a
      >fractional still. Do you know how the term Coffey still came about ? is
      >it named after an inventor ?
      >I have been in email contact with John Stone in the past and have his
      >book, his design is one of the better ones out there on the web but I am
      >not so impressed with his methods of making a wash.
      >Ray
      >
      >
      >
      >Connie Zein wrote:
      >Can someone please tell me what the types of stills are. I understand
      >there
      >are two main types ie Pot Still and Coffey Still?
      >What are the advantages of each?
      >
      >The Coffey Still (or Patent Still) is essentially the same as the Pot
      >Still. You may have
      >seen pictures of Coffey Stills as they are used in the manufacture of
      >whiskey. They are
      >essentially a boiler connected to a condenser, and generally 2 passes
      >are required in order
      >to produce a potable product. If the product is consumed immediately
      >then you are drinking
      >moonshine which contains large quantities of fusel oils and other
      >nasties. These are
      >chemically modified through storage of the product and aging and give
      >whiskeys, brandies etc
      >their characteristic flavour.
      >
      >Refluxing fractionating columns give a much purer product as they
      >effectively redistill many,
      >many times as the raw material progresses up the column. If you want to
      >know how to do it
      >properly, I strongly recommend a visit to John Stone's web site
      >http://www.gin-vodka.com/main.htm
      >
      >Good luck,
      >Mike
      >
      >--
      >
      >
      >--------------------------- ONElist Sponsor ----------------------------
      >
      >ATTN ONELIST USERS: stay current on the latest activities,
      >programs, & features at ONElist by joining our member newsletter at
      ><a href=" http://www.onelist.com/subscribe/onelist_announce ">Click</a>
      >
      >------------------------------------------------------------------------
      >
      >
      >
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.