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Vinegar from ethanol

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  • Tony & Elle Ackland
    Ed, Tarvus - you re both right ... (aside from Ed s ethanol-methanol backtofront) Vinegar is from the oxidation of ethanol, with bacteria present ; see :
    Message 1 of 2 , Sep 9, 2000
      Ed, Tarvus - you're both right ... (aside from Ed's ethanol-methanol
      backtofront)

      Vinegar is from the oxidation of ethanol, with bacteria present ; see :
      http://newton.dep.anl.gov/askasci/chem99/chem99016.htm
      http://nowheat.com/fooddb/food/vinegar.htm

      the second site has " ...Distilled vinegar is not distilled. The name
      merely means that it is made from distilled alcohol. This is done in a
      fermentation process in which the fermenting bacteria, a species of
      Acetobacter, oxidizes the added alcohol to acetic acid. The fermentation
      mixture is filtered and diluted to give an acetic acid concentration of
      about 5%. This is vinegar ...."

      and ..."This process involves a second fermentation (the alcoholic yeast
      fermentation being the first) that uses bacteria, a species of Acetobacter,
      in place of the yeast. The procedure is basically the same whether the
      alcohol is U.S.P. grade or the crude alcoholic mixtures in fermented apple
      or grape juice. The bacteria in the vigouously aerated vinegar reactor may
      be in suspension or on the surface of wood chips, and the liquid phase
      contains in addition to the alcohol source, a nutrient mixture to keep the
      Acetobacter growing while they oxidize alcohol to acetic acid. The nutrient
      mixture is said to consist of a variety of salts and some carbon and
      nitrogen sources such as glucose, citric acid, ammonium phosphate, some
      yeast extract or dried yeast, and hydrolyzed soy flour. At the conclusion
      of the fermentation the vinegar is not distilled, but rather is filtered to
      remove microorganisms and particulate material and diluted to bring the
      acetic acid level down from values as high as 15 to 20% to roughly 5% "
    • tarvus
      Thanks for the clarification, Tony! It emphasises my point about practicing good sanitation. I must admit I was unaware that the acetobacter bacteria
      Message 2 of 2 , Sep 10, 2000
        Thanks for the clarification, Tony! It emphasises my point about
        practicing good sanitation. I must admit I was unaware that the
        acetobacter bacteria actually converted the alcohol. As is often the
        case, I learned somethingnew from you!

        Tar
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