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Ethanol, vinegar and H2S Re: [Distillers] Digest Number 258

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  • Edward Hamilton
    H2S is a gas which is in solution with the fermented wash and is stripped from the wash by aeration. The H2S gas does not react with the O2 in the air since
    Message 1 of 2 , Sep 9, 2000
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      H2S is a gas which is in solution with the fermented wash and is stripped
      from the wash by aeration. The H2S gas does not react with the O2 in the air
      since H2S is a stable compound. As for ethanol combining with the O2 to form
      vinegar, there is very little ethanol formed in a wash of molasses and less
      when fermenting fresh sugar cane juice.
      When I first started drinking rum made in the most primitive stills I was
      worried about ethanol and took some to a friend at a large distillery who
      ran it through a gas chromatograph. It was clean, to my relief.
      Problems with ethanol start to arise when you introduce things other than
      sucrose into the wash.
      As Ted pointed out you need a good reflux still to remove ethanol and all of
      the distillers that ferment molasses use at least a two column still with at
      least 25 plates in each column.
      Cheers,
      Ed
    • tarvus
      Ed, I think you are confusing alcohols here. Methanol is the bad stuff. Ethanol is the good stuff. The whole idea of fermentation is to maximize ethanol for
      Message 2 of 2 , Sep 9, 2000
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        Ed,
        I think you are confusing alcohols here. Methanol is the bad stuff.
        Ethanol is the good stuff. The whole idea of fermentation is to
        maximize ethanol for extraction by the distillation process:)

        As for the vinegar, it's a byproduct of certain bacterial infections
        in the wash, not a combination of alcohol with oxygen. Given a
        sufficient quantity of yeast pitched at the onset of fermentation,
        and sufficient attention given to sanitation, the yeast growth should
        outpace the bacterial growth until sufficient alcohol is created to
        further inhibit bacterial growth.

        regards!
        Tar


        --- In Distillers@egroups.com, "Edward Hamilton" <ed@m...> wrote:
        > H2S is a gas which is in solution with the fermented wash and is
        stripped
        > from the wash by aeration. The H2S gas does not react with the O2
        in the air
        > since H2S is a stable compound. As for ethanol combining with the
        O2 to form
        > vinegar, there is very little ethanol formed in a wash of molasses
        and less
        > when fermenting fresh sugar cane juice.
        > When I first started drinking rum made in the most primitive stills
        I was
        > worried about ethanol and took some to a friend at a large
        distillery who
        > ran it through a gas chromatograph. It was clean, to my relief.
        > Problems with ethanol start to arise when you introduce things
        other than
        > sucrose into the wash.
        > As Ted pointed out you need a good reflux still to remove ethanol
        and all of
        > the distillers that ferment molasses use at least a two column
        still with at
        > least 25 plates in each column.
        > Cheers,
        > Ed
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