Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: More Of The Same

Expand Messages
  • rodmacd2000
    Smudge after this post I can only see two possibilities: you are just a plain nut or you are a member of the flat-earth society (doesn t preclude the first
    Message 1 of 4 , Apr 1, 2003
      Smudge after this post I can only see two possibilities: you are just
      a plain nut or you are a member of the flat-earth society (doesn't
      preclude the first possibility).

      I suppose there is also the chance that you're just having fun with
      us. Is this the case Smudge? Please let us know.

      --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "smudge311065" <smudge@b...> wrote:
      > Here's yesterday's post explained a little differently.
      >
      > There is a relationship between output temperature and output
      purity.
      > This relationship is not cause and effect – its effect and
      effect.
      >
      > Output purity and temperature change together as a result of a
      > process that occurs in the column. Call this process heat transfer,
      > call it reflux, call it Brian. I don't care what you call it,
      because
      > alcohol doesn't care what you call it.
      >
      > This relationship is defined by the following equation:
      >
      > y = -2E-07x6 + 9E-05x5 - 0.0189x4 + 2.229x3 - 147.27x2 + 5177x
      –
      75640
      >
      > Y is the % output, X is the temp, and degrees are in Celsius. This
      is
      > based on other people's research into the behaviour of
      ethanol/water
      > vapour. The best-fit line is thanks to Microsoft. It's not a
      perfect
      > predictor, but its pretty close.
      >
      > This relationship is not up for debate. This relationship applies
      to
      > ethanol/water vapour and is irrespective of still design. Your
      still
      > design may preclude you from operating at some points on this line,
      > but it DOES NOT CHANGE THIS RELATIONSHIP.
      >
      > For someone to say purity is important and temperature is not is
      > simply ridiculous – they are two sides of the same coin. Every
      point
      > at which you operate your still can be equally described in terms
      of
      > purity or temperature.
      >
      > I confuse people by saying I set the temperature at the top of my
      > column. That is true in practical terms, but in reality this is a
      > simplification of the truth:
      >
      > The only thing I do at the top of my column is MEASURE the
      > temperature. Just like the rest of you.
      >
      > I will throw away my controller for a minute and replace the
      > thermocouple with a thermometer. As I'm distilling, I notice the
      > output temperature start to rise. (I could also notice the purity
      > drop, but its easier to measure the temperature). If I had a reflux
      > valve I could increase the reflux ratio to compensate. I don't have
      a
      > reflux valve so I reduce the input power, which is just another way
      > of increasing the reflux ratio.
      >
      > You can measure the output purity and adjust the reflux ratio
      > directly, or measure the output temperature and adjust the input
      > power. Same effective measurement; same effective action.
      >
      > The one and only real difference is that you make this adjustment
      > manually and I have a box that does it for me. (And I'm told I have
      a
      > lot to learn about still design).
      >
      >
      > Smudge
    • BOKAKOB
      Stop Smudging My Brainz!!!! smudge311065 wrote:Here s yesterday s post explained a little differently. There is a relationship between
      Message 2 of 4 , Apr 1, 2003

        Stop Smudging My Brainz!!!!

         smudge311065 <smudge@...> wrote:

        Here's yesterday's post explained a little differently.

        There is a relationship between output temperature and output purity.
        This relationship is not cause and effect � its effect and effect.

        Output purity and temperature change together as a result of a
        process that occurs in the column. Call this process heat transfer,
        call it reflux, call it Brian. I don't care what you call it, because
        alcohol doesn't care what you call it.

        This relationship is defined by the following equation:

        y = -2E-07x6 + 9E-05x5 - 0.0189x4 + 2.229x3 - 147.27x2 + 5177x � 75640

        Y is the % output, X is the temp, and degrees are in Celsius. This is
        based on other people's research into the behaviour of ethanol/water
        vapour. The best-fit line is thanks to Microsoft. It's not a perfect
        predictor, but its pretty close.

        This relationship is not up for debate. This relationship applies to
        ethanol/water vapour and is irrespective of still design. Your still
        design may preclude you from operating at some points on this line,
        but it DOES NOT CHANGE THIS RELATIONSHIP.

        For someone to say purity is important and temperature is not is
        simply ridiculous � they are two sides of the same coin. Every point
        at which you operate your still can be equally described in terms of
        purity or temperature.

        I confuse people by saying I set the temperature at the top of my
        column. That is true in practical terms, but in reality this is a
        simplification of the truth:

        The only thing I do at the top of my column is MEASURE the
        temperature. Just like the rest of you.

        I will throw away my controller for a minute and replace the
        thermocouple with a thermometer. As I'm distilling, I notice the
        output temperature start to rise. (I could also notice the purity
        drop, but its easier to measure the temperature). If I had a reflux
        valve I could increase the reflux ratio to compensate. I don't have a
        reflux valve so I reduce the input power, which is just another way
        of increasing the reflux ratio.

        You can measure the output purity and adjust the reflux ratio
        directly, or measure the output temperature and adjust the input
        power. Same effective measurement; same effective action.

        The one and only real difference is that you make this adjustment
        manually and I have a box that does it for me. (And I'm told I have a
        lot to learn about still design).


        Smudge




        To unsubscribe from this group send an email to  distillers-unsubscribe@onelist.com

        Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.


        I can be wrong I must say
        Cheers, Alex...
        A



        Do you Yahoo!?
        Yahoo! Tax Center - File online, calculators, forms, and more

      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.