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6454Re: Q2. Effect of Pressure?

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  • motie_d
    Oct 2, 2002
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      --- In Distillers@y..., George Wessel <georgelola@n...> wrote:
      > >
      > Just a though off the top of my head.
      >
      > We're entering fall here now so our outside temp is cooler than our
      > inside. So if my boiler was inside, at room temp, it would be
      about 20
      > to 30 degrees Cent. If my condenser was outside it would be 10
      degrees
      > today and even colder later on.
      >
      > I do not know at what temp alcohol would boil in any mixture of
      alcohol
      > and water. So I'll have to just pull a number out of the air, let's
      say
      > alcohol will vaporize at 20 inches of vacuum at 20 degrees Cent.

      My very basic experiment showed me that at 20 inches of vacuum, the
      alcohol will make a fog in the container at 85F (30C). That concluded
      my test at that time, because the old compressor I used wouldn't pull
      more vacuum than that, and I wanted to keep the temp down to a
      survivable level for Yeast in order to keep the ferment going. I
      wasn't after a vacuum distillation, per se. I wanted to ferment under
      vacum to try to make a continous process.

      By
      > using a storage tank, apply a vacuum to the boiler, lead the
      suction
      > line outside to a condenser.

      I envisioned using the vacuum storage tank as the condensor. The
      alcohol vapors should condense to liquid, and if further vacuum was
      needed, you would only be pumping CO2 through your compressor. The
      alcohol vapors should not have to pass through the compressor.

      The outside temp is below the vapor temp
      > of alcohol so the vapor would condense. The liquid alcohol will
      remain
      > outside at a cooler temp until it is time to collect it. The
      compressor,
      > storage tank and boiler are all inside where it is warm. Only the
      > condenser is outside. As long as the vacuum is maintaned at a
      level
      > above the vapor point of alcohol (At room temp) but below that of
      water.
      > Would it not separate the two. After a few hours or days would
      you
      > not have water in your boiler and alcohol in your condenser. Maybe
      the
      > two vapor points would be to close to stay between, I have no idea.
      I
      > wouldn't think that some sort of vacuum control would be to hard to
      come
      > up with.
      >
      >
      >
      > Would the vacuum have to be increase as the alcohol level comes
      down?

      I think it would, or else increase the temp slightly. I was going to
      let the Yeast keep my alcohol concentration up, with the vacuum
      keeping the alcohol concentration from getting too high for east
      survivabilty.

      > Just a thought
      Keep those thoughts coming!
      > George
      Motie
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