Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

47198RE: [Distillers] Re: Rice Mash

Expand Messages
  • bruce cook
    Sep 25, 2010
    • 0 Attachment
      This implies that the only way to convert rice starch to sugar for fermenting is the use of "Koji".  Then, we will end up with "Sake".  Are there any other methods, i.e. the use of enzymes, malting the rice, malted barley, etc. which would convert the rice starch to sugar?  I am interested in using rice to make alcholol fuel, not "Sake".

      Thanks,
      Bruce


      To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
      From: waljaco@...
      Date: Sat, 25 Sep 2010 06:08:59 +0000
      Subject: [Distillers] Re: Rice Mash

       


      --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@...> wrote:
      >
      > Koji is a pure strain of Aspergillus oryzae. Yeast needs to be added for fermentation But once the Japanese did use saliva enzymes! This practice is restricted to the Amazon Basin now. Most Asian countries use a mixed starter of wild fungi, bacteria and yeasts which gives more flavour complexity. The Koreans still use to some extent malted barley also.
      > Most grains contain about 60% starch, so rice has a certain advantage. For sake, the Japanese use a highly polished rice that has 85% starch.
      > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Distillers/message/17499
      >
      > wal
      > wal
      >
      > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, sigrune@ wrote:
      > >
      > > Un-sprouted rice has no appreciable enzymes to convert sugar to starch.
      > >
      > > In the traditional method Wal lists usually there is the addition of Koji, a mold that breaks the starch into sugar.
      > > Of course you can always have Asian girls chew the rice to start the enzyme process...
      > >
      > >
      > > ----Original Message-----
      > > From: made_it_myself <doctorlawrencebrown@>
      > > To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
      > > Sent: Thu, Sep 23, 2010 10:31 am
      > > Subject: [Distillers] Re: Rice Mash
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > >Sorry to sound a little dim, but does this mean the starch is converted to sugars during the extra
      > > >cooking cycle or does the yeast do the job?
      > >
      >


    • Show all 17 messages in this topic