Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

1916Re: [Distillers] yeast propagation

Expand Messages
  • Ted Palmer
    Mar 6 9:02 AM
    • 0 Attachment
      make sure the yeast you want gets a good start and
      eliminates any wild yeast that is trying to get started.
      Wild yeasts are not reduced or even slowed down by a strong ferment, in fact some wild yeasts can even kill the brewing yeasts to become the major component of the cell count. You are referring to non acid loving bacteria and aerobic bacteria. The yeast as they ferment lower the pH and remove all the oxygen from the wash making life difficult for many bacteria and some types of molds.
       
      I understand spore/yeast propagation beyond a
      3rd generation runs the risk of noticeable mutation, from our point of view the
      consequences could be increased production of higher alcohols/fusel oils.
      This is true to an extent. It really depends on the genetics of the cell and the stability of the environment that it exists in. brewing yeast is fairly stable and can give you 10 to 50 generations if the wash is the same every time, temperature doesn't vary and it is not allowed to go into hibernation too often.
       
      _____________
      Ted Palmer
      tpalmer@...
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Dick
      Sent: Monday, March 05, 2001 3:32 PM
      Subject: Re: [Distillers] yeast propagation

      Hi all,
              Doesn't the same argument apply here as I've heard against home-
      brewers propagating yeast - if we don't buy yeast from the people who are
      prepared to sell us good yeasts then they'll stop supplying & then we'll have
      no decent yeasts available. Just a thought !!

              From a brewing/wort preparation point of view I'm a firm believer in
      having a decent starter - for a 25l wash pitch with at least 4l of an ACTIVE
      yeast solution, make sure the yeast you want gets a good start and
      eliminates any wild yeast that is trying to get started. Mind you, I've never
      had any problem with turbo yeast - other than when I added it to an already
      fermenting wort - it foamed up all over the place within 2/3 minutes.

              Searching another aspect of micro spore propagation on the Net
      (magic mushrooms I think !!) I understand spore/yeast propagation beyond a
      3rd generation runs the risk of noticeable mutation, from our point of view the
      consequences could be increased production of higher alcohols/fusel oils.
      Anyone any further comments ??
      --
      Dick


      Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.
    • Show all 10 messages in this topic