Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Impact of ADA: Assessing Progress

Expand Messages
  • Rick
    I ve provided just a snippet of the Executive Summary in this post. While many Americans with disabilities are experiencing improvements in quality of life,
    Message 1 of 2 , Jul 29, 2007
    View Source
    • 0 Attachment
      I've provided just a snippet of the Executive Summary in this post.
      "While many Americans with disabilities are experiencing
      improvements in quality of life, some people with disabilities remain
      disenfranchised.

      This retrospective study and review provides a snapshot of the
      impact the ADA has had on the lives of Americans with disabilities
      over the past sixteen years. Specifically:..."

      To access the complete report go here:
      http://www.ncd.gov/newsroom/publications/2007/ada_impact_07-26-07.htm
      or
      http://snipr.com/1owo3

      Rick
      Massachusetts

      - -

      The Impact of the Americans with Disabilities Act: Assessing the
      Progress Toward Achieving the Goals of the ADA

      National Council on Disability
      July 26, 2007

      National Council on Disability
      1313 F Street, NW, Suite 850
      Washington, DC 20004

      Many people with disabilities, employers, and businesses, however,
      still do not understand major provisions of the ADA , particularly the
      employment provisions. The ADA is a civil rights law—requiring equal
      opportunity for individuals with disabilities, with broad coverage and
      setting clear, consistent, and enforceable standards prohibiting
      discrimination on the basis of disability. Title I of the ADA
      prohibits discrimination in employment. It does not provide for
      accessible housing, transportation to the work site, rehabilitation
      services, job training, job placement, or any form of affirmative
      action for people with disabilities. It does not address work
      disincentives, such as Social Security rules that make people with
      disabilities who work ineligible for Medicaid, the only form of
      insurance that provides the kind of services most people with
      disabilities need to function independently, nor does it require
      employers to provide the kind of insurance coverage people with
      disabilities need. While the ADA requires existing transportation
      services to become accessible, it does not provide transportation for
      people with disabilities to get to work if they work or live where
      there is no public transportation. To determine the impact of Title I,
      one must look at the degree to which employment discrimination against
      individuals with disabilities has decreased. One cannot measure the
      success of Title I solely by the employment rate of people with
      disabilities unless all other barriers to work are eliminated.

      Many Americans with disabilities remain frustrated that disability
      discrimination has not been eliminated, despite ADA implementation.
      People with disabilities reported the ADA has not been fully enforced;
      the barriers they face remain primarily attitudinal. Additionally,
      there is a growing backlash against disability rights and the ADA .
      The lack of national consistency of access makes it difficult for
      people with disabilities to carry out daily activities, and access to
      public transportation, particularly in rural areas, remains a serious
      problem. Although, once on the job, accommodations are easier to
      obtain, people with visible disabilities do not appear to be
      significantly more likely to be hired than before the ADA , and some
      argue that they are having more difficulty getting hired than before.

      To access the complete report go here:
      http://www.ncd.gov/newsroom/publications/2007/ada_impact_07-26-07.htm
      or
      http://snipr.com/1owo3
    • Dale
      ... In a recent battle, I was reminded that many people in power consider any accommodation for the disabled as a special privilege and not a civil right for
      Message 2 of 2 , Aug 2, 2007
      View Source
      • 0 Attachment
        On Sun, 29 Jul 2007 07:10:40 -0700, Rick <rlaferriere@...> wrote:

        > The Impact of the Americans with Disabilities Act: Assessing the
        > Progress Toward Achieving the Goals of the ADA
        >
        > National Council on Disability
        > July 26, 2007
        > The ADA is a civil rights law—requiring equal
        > opportunity for individuals with disabilities,

        In a recent battle, I was reminded that many people in power consider any
        accommodation for the disabled as a "special privilege" and not a civil
        right for equal access. Often, people don't even understand that the
        "non-disabled" majority are customarily given accommodations. For example,
        public facilities often accommodate the public with parking but sometimes
        offer only parking spaces designed for those with majority abilities but
        not for the minority with different abilities. IMO, it would help if the
        Green Party could distribute powerful Public Service Announcements in
        video and audio formats to help the public appreciate how the ADA promotes
        _equal_ access and not _special privileges_ or advantages.


        > [Title I] does not address work
        > disincentives, such as Social Security rules that make people with
        > disabilities who work ineligible for Medicaid, the only form of
        > insurance that provides the kind of services most people with
        > disabilities need to function independently,

        With the release of 'Sicko', it's a good time to make this point and
        expand the conversation. The whole system is set up to strip us of our
        assets as efficiently and completely as possible before we can get full
        insurance coverage, especially as needed for complex and chronic diseases.
        But then once we get Medicaid, we need especially good doctors who won't
        accept Medicaid/Medicare. You'll never hear Dr. House ask: "So which
        symptom do you want me to treat today?"

        > Many Americans with disabilities remain frustrated that disability
        > discrimination has not been eliminated, despite ADA implementation.
        > People with disabilities reported the ADA has not been fully enforced;
        > the barriers they face remain primarily attitudinal.

        This is one area where we can have an effect by using available access to
        media to affect attitudes in a positive direction.

        > Additionally,
        > there is a growing backlash against disability rights and the ADA.

        Some of that backlash could be because Congress has failed to adequately
        enforce funding by the DOJ and has left enforcement primarily to private
        individuals as if this isn't a recipe for a form of vigilante-ism and the
        complications that go along with that. Reducing this backlash is in our
        best interest which is one reason why I lobby for full funding of
        enforcement (and when they say they don't have the money, I suggest
        getting the money by ending the Iraq War so they can care for disabled
        vets).

        > The lack of national consistency of access makes it difficult for
        > people with disabilities to carry out daily activities,

        ...and makes operation of small businesses difficult because
        owner/operators don't know what's expected of them or when and how
        expectations will suddenly change when an out-of-towner shows up one day
        and files an access suit for something that was approved by the local
        building/zoning/fire officials. Funding of federal enforcement could
        improve consistency leading to a reduction of backlash.

        > Although, once on the job, accommodations are easier to
        > obtain, people with visible disabilities do not appear to be
        > significantly more likely to be hired than before the ADA , and some
        > argue that they are having more difficulty getting hired than before.

        As a person with an invisible disability, I take exception to being
        excluded because potential employers will be more likely to be suspicious
        of gaps in work history when the applicant "looks too healthy to be sick".

        --
        - - Dale Roose
        Hopelessness is surrender. Semper Veritas
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.