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Re: [Digital BW] Zounds - but is it the Zone?

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  • dickbo
    But what was the advantage as the stock must have added to production costs more than somewhat, or does the film industry lack the ability to process B&W movie
    Message 1 of 4 , May 1 12:23 AM
      But what was the advantage as the stock must have added to production costs
      more than somewhat, or does the film industry lack the ability to process
      B&W movie stock any more.

      Or have the emulsion producers stopped making the material?

      Anyway be that as it may, one wonders who 'lit' it because they surely knew
      their stuff.I can't remember being so struck by such class imagery since I
      first saw a Von Sternberg masterpiece.

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "Bruce Kinch" <pvx@...>
      To: <DigitalBlackandWhiteThePrint@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Tuesday, April 30, 2002 9:42 PM
      Subject: Re: [Digital BW] Zounds - but is it the Zone?


      > >I recently has ocassion to view a cinematic masterpiece named "The Man
      Who
      > >Was Not There", starring Billy Bob Thornton (how anyone with a name like
      > >Billy-Bob, could get anywhere in life escapes me entirely).
      > >
      > >This B&W visual stimulator was of such an outstanding image quality that
      I
      > >am wondering how the effect was obtained.
      > >For instance is it possible that the lighting cameraman used the Zone
      system
      > >in order to produce the recorded effects?
      > >
      > >There is at least one member of this group who actually works in the
      movie
      > >industry, perhaps he migh care to waffle a bit and elucidate on the
      subject
      > >generally.
      >
      > Sorry for delayed response, but as no one else seemed to pick it up....
      >
      > TMWWNT was shot on color neg stock, printed B&W. Like scanning RGB
      > and converting to Grayscale.
      >
      > >
      >
      >
      > --
      > Bruce C. Kinch
      > Associate Professor of Photography
      > The Art Institute of Boston at Lesley University
      >
      >
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    • Darren Collins
      Maybe shooting in colour and converting to B&W gave them the opportunity to play around with colour filters *after* shooting to achieve their desired look? ...
      Message 2 of 4 , May 1 12:46 AM
        Maybe shooting in colour and converting to B&W gave them the opportunity to
        play around with colour filters *after* shooting to achieve their desired
        look?

        -----Original Message-----

        But what was the advantage as the stock must have added to production costs
        more than somewhat, or does the film industry lack the ability to process
        B&W movie stock any more.

        Or have the emulsion producers stopped making the material?

        Anyway be that as it may, one wonders who 'lit' it because they surely knew
        their stuff.I can't remember being so struck by such class imagery since I
        first saw a Von Sternberg masterpiece.



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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