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Use of UT14 "Glop"

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  • rossfmj
    I have just started using UT14 and am currently using a duplicate grey in the Y position, as per Paul Roark s posts elsewhere. I haven t found any
    Message 1 of 5 , Feb 3, 2013
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      I have just started using UT14 and am currently using a duplicate grey in the Y position, as per Paul Roark's posts elsewhere. I haven't found any documentation as to using the Glop so don't know its intended use. Is it used as an overspray during a second print pass to counter the effects of black tones overcoming the glossiness on gloss paper?

      Ross
    • David
      Ross, I think that the usual practice is to use the glop where ink is not used, so as to minimize the difference in reflectivity of the regions with and
      Message 2 of 5 , Feb 3, 2013
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        Ross,
        I think that the usual practice is to use the glop where ink is not used, so as to minimize the difference in reflectivity of the regions with and without ink. My experience is that the gloss differential is quite minimal with the UT-14 inks, and I never tried using the glop channel.

        David

        --- In DigitalBlackandWhiteThePrint@yahoogroups.com, "rossfmj" wrote:
        >
        > I have just started using UT14 and am currently using a duplicate grey in the Y position, as per Paul Roark's posts elsewhere. I haven't found any documentation as to using the Glop so don't know its intended use. Is it used as an overspray during a second print pass to counter the effects of black tones overcoming the glossiness on gloss paper?
        >
        > Ross
        >
      • rossfmj
        ... At the stage I am at I am not sure how I d set up for this, and as its use seems limited and Paul is not supporting it, I am trying to work out what to do
        Message 3 of 5 , Feb 4, 2013
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          --- In DigitalBlackandWhiteThePrint@yahoogroups.com, "David" wrote:
          >
          > Ross,
          > I think that the usual practice is to use the glop where ink is not used, so as to minimize the difference in reflectivity of the regions with and without ink. My experience is that the gloss differential is quite minimal with the UT-14 inks, and I never tried using the glop channel.
          >
          > David

          At the stage I am at I am not sure how I'd set up for this, and as its use seems limited and Paul is not supporting it, I am trying to work out what to do with this 4oz bottle. Being notoriously tight fisted (Scottish Ancestry and a past resident of Yorkshire), paying approx $20 for something I might not use rankles.

          I believe it to be the base for UT14 inks so think I may be able to use it to mix my own, probably when I have greater understanding of the system and processes used.
        • Paul Roark
          ... The original Ut14 Photoshop curves and ICCs for glossy paper (and even one matte profile, I think) did utilize the glop. Look at the PS curves for how I
          Message 4 of 5 , Feb 4, 2013
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            rossfmj <ross.jarvis@...> wrote:

            > **
            >
            >
            > ...
            >
            > At the stage I am at I am not sure how I'd set up for this [glop], and as
            > its use seems limited and Paul is not supporting it,
            >

            The original Ut14 Photoshop curves and ICCs for glossy paper (and even one
            matte profile, I think) did utilize the glop. Look at the PS curves for
            how I used it. The uses include stopping a gloss differential between the
            bare paper (0% ink) and where the ink is used, reducing bronzing, and
            slightly raising the warmth of matte prints. I assumed when I designed
            the inkset that the QTR community and users would make their own QTR
            profiles, so I did not do that. (QTR needs you to avoid the pure white 255
            and have that value at 254 to use glop for gloss diffenential purposes.)
            The PS curves, however, were included so ICC makers could simply use
            existing curves for new papers. That, I thought, made the ICC process so
            easy that my making more ICCs was not needed.

            It appears that the 1430 will continue that printers life for some time and
            that the UT14 inkset continues to be popular and would be more useful to
            many if there were more profiles. So, if MIS supplies some ink, I'll make
            some more profiles on my 1400, which I've been led to believe is identical
            to the 1430 as far as profiling goes. (I do hope this is true, as buying a
            new 1430 is not something I intend to do, having 2 fine 1400s already.)

            Going forward, however, I don't have much interest in glop. What I'd like
            to do is see if I can make the UT14 inkset print more smoothly. I
            think focusing on midtone microbanding is the main issue in this respect.
            I don't think I've ever heard complaints about any highlight dots.

            So, while the glop does have some uses on some papers, and there are curves
            that support it, I hope the Y position can be used to better advantage for
            smoothness, but I have yet to test this.



            > I am trying to work out what to do with this 4oz [glop] bottle. ...
            > I believe it to be the base for UT14 inks so think I may be able to use it
            > to mix my own, probably when I have greater understanding of the system and
            > processes used.
            >
            Correct. You could see if an "LLC" (30% UT14-LC, 70% glop) makes a more
            useful Y-position ink than a second UT14-LC.

            In another post you talked of color spaces (Edit>Color settings). My
            standard is setting the RGB space to Adobe RGB (1998) and the gray space to
            Gray Gamma 2.2. QTR does not use color spaces as such. If you graph Lab L
            values of the gray patches in
            http://www.paulroark.com/BW-Info/21-step.jpgin, for example, Excel
            (Insert>Chart>Line) after linearization, you'll get
            a straight line. I routinely use my Spyder3Print "spectro" to read the
            test strips. Then I pull the text data into Excel and graph the results to
            see what the gray ramp (Lab L values) and also (separately) the Lab A and B
            values look like.

            (The inkseparation.tif is RGB, but the program uses that file for a special
            purpose.)

            Paul
            www.PaulRoark.com


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • rossfmj
            Once again, thanks for your time and input Paul. At the moment I am still trying to get to grips with QTR, and seem to be bogged down a bit at the calibration
            Message 5 of 5 , Feb 4, 2013
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              Once again, thanks for your time and input Paul. At the moment I am still trying to get to grips with QTR, and seem to be bogged down a bit at the calibration stage. I haven't yet looked at the PS curves procedures yet, but may switch to this to explore.

              I am very impressed by some of the prints I have made so far and am still very excited by the possibilities of UT14, with or without Glop, but as I only started Electric Photography in December, hadn't used a Mac since 1993, nor used Photoshop ever, before Christmas, I have a number of learning curves to master.

              There is also the need to point the camera at the right thing at the right time, but that's another matter!

              regards

              Ross
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