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Obama Candidacy Spurs Voter Registration

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  • Charles C. Primas
    Obama Candidacy Spurs Voter Registration Reported by: Denis
    Message 1 of 1 , Jun 8, 2008
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      Obama Candidacy Spurs Voter Registration


      Reported by: Denis
      <mailto:dohayer@...?subject=viewer%20question%20about%20an%20ar
      ticle&body=Link:http://www.11alive.com/includes/tools/print.aspx?storyid=116
      957> O'Hayer

      http://www.11alive.com/news/local/story.aspx?storyid=116957
      <http://www.11alive.com/news/local/story.aspx?storyid=116957&catid=3>
      &catid=3

      ATLANTA -- Senator Barack Obama will be the first African-American to head a
      major-party ticket. That historic "first" has already sparked a drive to
      improve the turnout among some of Georgia's most reluctant voters:
      African-American men.

      Part of the pitch is that their votes could make a difference here.

      Carl Burke hasn't voted in years. But he registered at the Grady hospital
      drive by the Coalition for the People's Agenda. He was inspired in part by
      Barack Obama's surge to the Democratic presidential nomination.

      "A lot of times people say your vote don't count no way. But I think it's
      proven that it do count," Burke said. "This'll be my first time voting in
      50-something years of living."

      Kent Feaster, like other new voters, told us this year's Democratic
      candidates convinced him to register, though not the candidate you might
      assume. "I like Hillary better, to be honest about it. But this will show
      that we are an equal opportunity country," he said.

      Of course, there's a big question: once these folks have registered, will
      they actually show up to vote in November?

      One way to get a clue is to look at the turnout for the Super Tuesday
      primary back in February.

      According to figures from the Secretary of State's office, this year's
      Georgia Democratic primary saw turnout among black men jump to 42 percent,
      nearly double the 23 percent from 2004.

      Black women did double their turnout percentage from 26 percent in 2004 to
      52 percent this year.

      Clark-Atlanta University Professor William Boone said if black men surge to
      the polls in November, they could move Georgia from Republican to "in play",
      but only if the Obama campaign reaches Georgia's black voters personally.

      "I think they will also have to put some money on the ground, something they
      did not do last time -- the last two times," Boone said.

      Boone said if Democrats want to take Georgia, they'll need even more than a
      surge in the black vote. He said they'll have to combine that with a strong
      showing by Libertarian presidential candidate Bob Barr.


      Regards,

      -Charles C. Primas

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