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NYTimes.com Article: Fistfuls of Dollars

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  • leftinidaho@hotmail.com
    This article from NYTimes.com has been sent to you by leftinidaho@hotmail.com. The Bushit is hitting the fan...Better duck! leftinidaho@hotmail.com
    Message 1 of 4 , Sep 1, 2003
      This article from NYTimes.com
      has been sent to you by leftinidaho@....


      The Bushit is hitting the fan...Better duck!

      leftinidaho@...

      /-------------------- advertisement -----------------------\

      Explore more of Starbucks at Starbucks.com.
      http://www.starbucks.com/default.asp?ci=1015
      \----------------------------------------------------------/

      Fistfuls of Dollars

      August 29, 2003
      By PAUL KRUGMAN






      It's all coming true. Before the war, hawks insisted that
      Iraq was a breeding ground for terrorism. It wasn't then,
      but it is now. Meanwhile, administration apologists blamed
      terrorists, not tax cuts, for record budget deficits. In
      fact, before the war terrorism-related spending was
      relatively small - less than $40 billion in fiscal 2002.
      But the costs of a "bring 'em on" foreign policy are now
      looming large indeed.

      The direct military cost of the occupation is $4 billion a
      month, and there's no end in sight. But that's only part of
      the bill.

      This week Paul Bremer suddenly admitted that Iraq would
      need "several tens of billions" in aid next year. That
      remark was probably aimed not at the public but at his
      masters in Washington; he apparently needed to get their
      attention.

      It's no mystery why. The Coalition Provisional Authority,
      which has been operating partly on seized Iraqi assets, is
      about to run out of money. Initial optimism about
      replenishing the authority's funds with oil revenue has
      vanished: even if sabotage and looting subside, the
      dilapidated state of the industry means that for several
      years much of its earnings will have to be reinvested in
      repair work.

      At a deeper level, the wobbling credibility of the
      occupation undermines that occupation's financing. American
      officials still hope to raise money by selling off
      state-owned enterprises to foreign investors, though they
      have backed off on proposals to sell power plants and other
      utilities. But after the bombing of U.N. headquarters, who
      will buy? Officials have also floated the idea of pledging
      future oil revenues in return for loans, but it's far from
      clear whether an occupying power has the right to make such
      deals, let alone whether they would be honored by whoever
      is running Iraq a few years from now.

      So Mr. Bremer was telling his masters that they can no
      longer fake it: he needs money, now.

      The biggest cost of the Iraq venture, however, may not be
      Mr. Bremer's problem; it may not even come in Iraq. Our
      commitment of large forces there creates the need for a
      bigger military, even as it degrades the effectiveness of
      our existing forces.

      These days it's hard to find a military expert not
      reporting to Donald Rumsfeld who thinks we have enough
      soldiers in Iraq. But to those who say, "Send in more
      troops," the answer is, "What troops?"

      Gen. Eric Shinseki, then the Army's chief of staff,
      prophetically warned that the postwar occupation would
      require more soldiers than the war itself. In his farewell
      address he made a broader point, that if we're going to do
      this sort of thing, we need a bigger military: "Beware the
      12-division strategy for a 10-division Army."

      The rule of thumb, according to military experts, is that
      except during crises, only one brigade in three should be
      deployed abroad. Yet today 21 of the Army's 33 combat
      brigades are deployed overseas, 16 of them in Iraq. This
      puts enormous stress on the troops, who find that they have
      only brief periods of rest and retraining between the times
      spent in harm's way. For example, most of a brigade of the
      82nd Airborne that is about to go to Iraq returned from
      Afghanistan only six months ago.

      So unless we can somehow extricate ourselves from Iraq
      quickly, or persuade other countries to bear a lot more of
      the burden, we need a considerably bigger military. And
      that means spending a lot more money.

      For now, the administration is in denial. "There will be no
      retreat," President Bush says - Churchillian words, but
      where are the resources to back them up?

      Mr. Rumsfeld won't admit that we need more troops in Iraq
      or anywhere else. We could use help from other countries,
      but it's doubtful whether the administration will accept
      the kind of meaningful power-sharing that might lead to a
      new Security Council resolution on Iraq, which might in
      turn bring in allied forces.

      Still, even the government of a superpower can't
      simultaneously offer tax cuts equal to 15 percent of
      revenue, provide all its retirees with prescription drugs
      and single-handedly take on the world's evildoers -
      single-handedly because we've alienated our allies. In
      fact, given the size of our budget deficit, it's not clear
      that we can afford to do even one of these things. Someday,
      when the grown-ups are back in charge, they'll have quite a
      mess to clean up.��

      http://www.nytimes.com/2003/08/29/opinion/29KRUG.html?ex=1063475603&ei=1&en=2b7e5eebad93c499


      ---------------------------------

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    • Tina Denning
      I just had a sticker for my car made....saying... No More BUSHit....people love it! Tina ... ----------------------------------------------------------/ ...
      Message 2 of 4 , Sep 2, 2003
        I just had a sticker for my car made....saying...

        No More BUSHit....people love it!
        Tina
        --- leftinidaho@... wrote:
        > This article from NYTimes.com
        > has been sent to you by leftinidaho@....
        >
        >
        > The Bushit is hitting the fan...Better duck!
        >
        > leftinidaho@...
        >
        > /-------------------- advertisement
        > -----------------------\
        >
        > Explore more of Starbucks at Starbucks.com.
        > http://www.starbucks.com/default.asp?ci=1015
        >
        \----------------------------------------------------------/
        >
        > Fistfuls of Dollars
        >
        > August 29, 2003
        > By PAUL KRUGMAN
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > It's all coming true. Before the war, hawks insisted
        > that
        > Iraq was a breeding ground for terrorism. It wasn't
        > then,
        > but it is now. Meanwhile, administration apologists
        > blamed
        > terrorists, not tax cuts, for record budget
        > deficits. In
        > fact, before the war terrorism-related spending was
        > relatively small - less than $40 billion in fiscal
        > 2002.
        > But the costs of a "bring 'em on" foreign policy are
        > now
        > looming large indeed.
        >
        > The direct military cost of the occupation is $4
        > billion a
        > month, and there's no end in sight. But that's only
        > part of
        > the bill.
        >
        > This week Paul Bremer suddenly admitted that Iraq
        > would
        > need "several tens of billions" in aid next year.
        > That
        > remark was probably aimed not at the public but at
        > his
        > masters in Washington; he apparently needed to get
        > their
        > attention.
        >
        > It's no mystery why. The Coalition Provisional
        > Authority,
        > which has been operating partly on seized Iraqi
        > assets, is
        > about to run out of money. Initial optimism about
        > replenishing the authority's funds with oil revenue
        > has
        > vanished: even if sabotage and looting subside, the
        > dilapidated state of the industry means that for
        > several
        > years much of its earnings will have to be
        > reinvested in
        > repair work.
        >
        > At a deeper level, the wobbling credibility of the
        > occupation undermines that occupation's financing.
        > American
        > officials still hope to raise money by selling off
        > state-owned enterprises to foreign investors, though
        > they
        > have backed off on proposals to sell power plants
        > and other
        > utilities. But after the bombing of U.N.
        > headquarters, who
        > will buy? Officials have also floated the idea of
        > pledging
        > future oil revenues in return for loans, but it's
        > far from
        > clear whether an occupying power has the right to
        > make such
        > deals, let alone whether they would be honored by
        > whoever
        > is running Iraq a few years from now.
        >
        > So Mr. Bremer was telling his masters that they can
        > no
        > longer fake it: he needs money, now.
        >
        > The biggest cost of the Iraq venture, however, may
        > not be
        > Mr. Bremer's problem; it may not even come in Iraq.
        > Our
        > commitment of large forces there creates the need
        > for a
        > bigger military, even as it degrades the
        > effectiveness of
        > our existing forces.
        >
        > These days it's hard to find a military expert not
        > reporting to Donald Rumsfeld who thinks we have
        > enough
        > soldiers in Iraq. But to those who say, "Send in
        > more
        > troops," the answer is, "What troops?"
        >
        > Gen. Eric Shinseki, then the Army's chief of staff,
        > prophetically warned that the postwar occupation
        > would
        > require more soldiers than the war itself. In his
        > farewell
        > address he made a broader point, that if we're going
        > to do
        > this sort of thing, we need a bigger military:
        > "Beware the
        > 12-division strategy for a 10-division Army."
        >
        > The rule of thumb, according to military experts, is
        > that
        > except during crises, only one brigade in three
        > should be
        > deployed abroad. Yet today 21 of the Army's 33
        > combat
        > brigades are deployed overseas, 16 of them in Iraq.
        > This
        > puts enormous stress on the troops, who find that
        > they have
        > only brief periods of rest and retraining between
        > the times
        > spent in harm's way. For example, most of a brigade
        > of the
        > 82nd Airborne that is about to go to Iraq returned
        > from
        > Afghanistan only six months ago.
        >
        > So unless we can somehow extricate ourselves from
        > Iraq
        > quickly, or persuade other countries to bear a lot
        > more of
        > the burden, we need a considerably bigger military.
        > And
        > that means spending a lot more money.
        >
        > For now, the administration is in denial. "There
        > will be no
        > retreat," President Bush says - Churchillian words,
        > but
        > where are the resources to back them up?
        >
        > Mr. Rumsfeld won't admit that we need more troops in
        > Iraq
        > or anywhere else. We could use help from other
        > countries,
        > but it's doubtful whether the administration will
        > accept
        > the kind of meaningful power-sharing that might lead
        > to a
        > new Security Council resolution on Iraq, which might
        > in
        > turn bring in allied forces.
        >
        > Still, even the government of a superpower can't
        > simultaneously offer tax cuts equal to 15 percent of
        > revenue, provide all its retirees with prescription
        > drugs
        > and single-handedly take on the world's evildoers -
        > single-handedly because we've alienated our allies.
        > In
        > fact, given the size of our budget deficit, it's not
        > clear
        > that we can afford to do even one of these things.
        > Someday,
        > when the grown-ups are back in charge, they'll have
        > quite a
        > mess to clean up.��
        >
        >
        http://www.nytimes.com/2003/08/29/opinion/29KRUG.html?ex=1063475603&ei=1&en=2b7e5eebad93c499
        >
        >
        > ---------------------------------
        >
        > Get Home Delivery of The New York Times Newspaper.
        > Imagine
        > reading The New York Times any time & anywhere you
        > like!
        > Leisurely catch up on events & expand your horizons.
        > Enjoy
        > now for 50% off Home Delivery! Click here:
        >
        > http://www.nytimes.com/ads/nytcirc/index.html
        >
        >
        >
        > HOW TO ADVERTISE
        > ---------------------------------
        > For information on advertising in e-mail newsletters
        >
        >
        === message truncated ===


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      • nickbayus
        ... TAKE BACK AMERICA! How does one go about making stickers? We could make a bunch and sell them cheap at the protests we re starting again and use the money
        Message 3 of 4 , Sep 2, 2003
          > WAY COOL! Thanks for putting yourself out there in the fight to
          TAKE BACK AMERICA! How does one go about making stickers? We could
          make a bunch and sell them cheap at the protests we're starting again
          and use the money the buy a brick or some commemorative something in
          the name of: NO MORE BUSH IT! or anything to fight and piss-off
          Repuglicans! Do you have any more stickers? I'd love one. Thanks,Nick

          I just had a sticker for my car made....saying...
          >
          > No More BUSHit....people love it!
          > Tina
          > ---
          > >
          > >
          > > The Bushit is hitting the fan...Better duck!
          > >

          > >
          > > /-------------------- advertisement
          > > -----------------------\
          > >
          > > Explore more of Starbucks at Starbucks.com.
          > > http://www.starbucks.com/default.asp?ci=1015
          > >
          > \----------------------------------------------------------/
          > >
        • Tina Denning
          Nick, I had it made at the Kootenai County Fair..of allplaces...at the booth that had more T & A ...you know the ones with the kid peeing in a puddle?? They
          Message 4 of 4 , Sep 2, 2003
            Nick, I had it made at the Kootenai County Fair..of
            allplaces...at the booth that had more T & A ...you
            know the ones with the kid peeing in a puddle?? They
            were out of Montana...it went on my window....at the
            Demo Booth they had a T-shirt with that on it...but
            bumper stickers...way cool....I will call the fair
            board maybe they can connect me with who it was...I
            think it was $6. Tina
            --- nickbayus <leftinidaho@...> wrote:
            >
            > > WAY COOL! Thanks for putting yourself out there in
            > the fight to
            > TAKE BACK AMERICA! How does one go about making
            > stickers? We could
            > make a bunch and sell them cheap at the protests
            > we're starting again
            > and use the money the buy a brick or some
            > commemorative something in
            > the name of: NO MORE BUSH IT! or anything to fight
            > and piss-off
            > Repuglicans! Do you have any more stickers? I'd love
            > one. Thanks,Nick
            >
            > I just had a sticker for my car made....saying...
            > >
            > > No More BUSHit....people love it!
            > > Tina
            > > ---
            > > >
            > > >
            > > > The Bushit is hitting the fan...Better duck!
            > > >
            >
            > > >
            > > > /-------------------- advertisement
            > > > -----------------------\
            > > >
            > > > Explore more of Starbucks at Starbucks.com.
            > > > http://www.starbucks.com/default.asp?ci=1015
            > > >
            > >
            >
            \----------------------------------------------------------/
            > > >
            >
            >
            >


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