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Re: [Delval17thcentury] Anne Arundel County Militia Muster 1683 - 1695 - Sept 17 and 18

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  • Janet Nickerson
    I will be there both days, and will be bringing the shop. I will need a 15 ft by 15ft space. Arthur will be there on Sunday. Janet ... From: machatej To:
    Message 1 of 5 , Sep 10, 2011
      I will be there both days, and will be bringing the shop.  I will need a 15 ft by 15ft space.  Arthur will be there on Sunday.
       
      Janet
       
       
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: machatej
      Sent: Thursday, September 08, 2011 8:04 PM
      Subject: [Delval17thcentury] Anne Arundel County Militia Muster 1683 - 1695 - Sept 17 and 18

       

      Anne Arundel County Militia Muster 1683 - 1695

      Date: Sept. 17 and 18, 2011. Arrival on the 16th is permitted, someone will be onsite to let people in.

      Location: Historic London Town and Gardens in Edgewater, MD. 839 Londontown Road, Edgewater, MD 21037

      Parking: Friday night and Sunday all parking is available in the lot at the site. During the day on Saturday we will need folks to park in the parking lot of a local nursing home which is adjacent to the Anne Arundel County police station.

      Event Info: This is the first of what I hope is an annual event at this site. We will be camped in the historic area of the facility and drilling on a bluff over-looking the South river. Locally there is plenty of eating and shopping and the site has real bathrooms and wood for us to use. Campfires will be permitted but no digging of fire pits as this is an archeological site with an active dig.

      Since this is the first time for this event I ask campers to be patient in getting tents set-up. We will be setting up the tents in a space between a fence and a garden, along the back wall of the tenement house and if we need to we can put some tents outside the fence line near the parking lot.

      London Town was the county seat from 1683-1695 and is the site on which the local militia would have come for muster. We are going to interpret for the public a local county militia muster as it may have looked in the 1690's, from the lack of training to the often poor weapon conditions (matchlocks and flintlocks mixed) and of course the lack of any uniform. We will be using the drill manual written by the rebel Duke of Monmouth to give us a baseline.

      For kit and camp we are looking for people to be wearing clothing and be accoutered appropriately for the period of 1670 - 1700 in the English, Dutch and French colonies.

      Registration: There is no formal registration but if you have a large tent or a large group I would like a heads up as to how many and how much space your tents will take.

      History of London Town, Maryland

      Though surveyed and patented by the English in the 1650s, the land that would become London Town does not appear to have been built upon until London Town was created by legislation in 1683. This legislation, "An Act for Advancement of Trade," created many towns and ports throughout Maryland. Not only was London Town legislated into existence at this time, it also became the county seat of Anne Arundel County.

      Archaeology and historical documents such as land records, probate inventories, and other sources indicate that London Town, paradoxically, did not begin to thrive until after Annapolis became both Maryland's capital and Anne Arundel's county seat in 1694. However, once the 18th century began, London Town grew and thrived before fading away at the end of the century.

      Shipping records, court cases, land deeds, probate inventories, newspaper advertisements, and the archaeological record all indicate that London Town met many needs during the 18th century. Many trans-Atlantic tobacco ships would gather tobacco at London Town before sailing to England and Europe where the tobacco was traded for manufactured items, spices, and other goods from around the globe. When these ships returned to the Chesapeake, merchants based in London Town would advertise these wares in the Maryland Gazette.

      Additionally, London Town's placement on the South River and on the main route between Boston, Massachusetts and Charleston, South Carolina, meant that the public ferry crossing was quite busy with travelers. Because all of these travelers needed someplace to eat, drink, spend the night, and get caught up on the latest news, London Town had between three and five public houses during its heyday.

      However, as the 18th century progressed, the tobacco trade, merchants, and travelers that had been so important to London Town's existence slowly became decoupled from London Town. In 1747, legislation concerned with the quality of Maryland's exported tobacco set up a system of inspection stations throughout the colony. Because London Town was not on the list of approved sites, it could no longer participate in the tobacco trade. As for the merchants, as Annapolis grew in prominence and London Town faded, the merchants moved their main stores to Annapolis and eventually closed their old ones in London Town. And finally, as the main north-south route shifted farther west due to the increased colonization of the colonies' western reaches, less travelers through London Town caused a corresponding decrease in the number of public houses.

      By the end of the American Revolution, only the William Brown House, a few wooden structures, and the ferry remained as a testament to what had once been a thriving Chesapeake town and port.

    • Tim
      Howdy Janet. Will you have weskits for sale? Tim Sent from my iPhone
      Message 2 of 5 , Sep 15, 2011
        Howdy Janet. Will you have weskits for sale?
        Tim

        Sent from my iPhone

        On Sep 10, 2011, at 5:30 AM, "Janet Nickerson" <art-n-janet@...> wrote:

         

        I will be there both days, and will be bringing the shop.  I will need a 15 ft by 15ft space.  Arthur will be there on Sunday.
         
        Janet
         
         
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: machatej
        Sent: Thursday, September 08, 2011 8:04 PM
        Subject: [Delval17thcentury] Anne Arundel County Militia Muster 1683 - 1695 - Sept 17 and 18

         

        Anne Arundel County Militia Muster 1683 - 1695

        Date: Sept. 17 and 18, 2011. Arrival on the 16th is permitted, someone will be onsite to let people in.

        Location: Historic London Town and Gardens in Edgewater, MD. 839 Londontown Road, Edgewater, MD 21037

        Parking: Friday night and Sunday all parking is available in the lot at the site. During the day on Saturday we will need folks to park in the parking lot of a local nursing home which is adjacent to the Anne Arundel County police station.

        Event Info: This is the first of what I hope is an annual event at this site. We will be camped in the historic area of the facility and drilling on a bluff over-looking the South river. Locally there is plenty of eating and shopping and the site has real bathrooms and wood for us to use. Campfires will be permitted but no digging of fire pits as this is an archeological site with an active dig.

        Since this is the first time for this event I ask campers to be patient in getting tents set-up. We will be setting up the tents in a space between a fence and a garden, along the back wall of the tenement house and if we need to we can put some tents outside the fence line near the parking lot.

        London Town was the county seat from 1683-1695 and is the site on which the local militia would have come for muster. We are going to interpret for the public a local county militia muster as it may have looked in the 1690's, from the lack of training to the often poor weapon conditions (matchlocks and flintlocks mixed) and of course the lack of any uniform. We will be using the drill manual written by the rebel Duke of Monmouth to give us a baseline.

        For kit and camp we are looking for people to be wearing clothing and be accoutered appropriately for the period of 1670 - 1700 in the English, Dutch and French colonies.

        Registration: There is no formal registration but if you have a large tent or a large group I would like a heads up as to how many and how much space your tents will take.

        History of London Town, Maryland

        Though surveyed and patented by the English in the 1650s, the land that would become London Town does not appear to have been built upon until London Town was created by legislation in 1683. This legislation, "An Act for Advancement of Trade," created many towns and ports throughout Maryland. Not only was London Town legislated into existence at this time, it also became the county seat of Anne Arundel County.

        Archaeology and historical documents such as land records, probate inventories, and other sources indicate that London Town, paradoxically, did not begin to thrive until after Annapolis became both Maryland's capital and Anne Arundel's county seat in 1694. However, once the 18th century began, London Town grew and thrived before fading away at the end of the century.

        Shipping records, court cases, land deeds, probate inventories, newspaper advertisements, and the archaeological record all indicate that London Town met many needs during the 18th century. Many trans-Atlantic tobacco ships would gather tobacco at London Town before sailing to England and Europe where the tobacco was traded for manufactured items, spices, and other goods from around the globe. When these ships returned to the Chesapeake, merchants based in London Town would advertise these wares in the Maryland Gazette.

        Additionally, London Town's placement on the South River and on the main route between Boston, Massachusetts and Charleston, South Carolina, meant that the public ferry crossing was quite busy with travelers. Because all of these travelers needed someplace to eat, drink, spend the night, and get caught up on the latest news, London Town had between three and five public houses during its heyday.

        However, as the 18th century progressed, the tobacco trade, merchants, and travelers that had been so important to London Town's existence slowly became decoupled from London Town. In 1747, legislation concerned with the quality of Maryland's exported tobacco set up a system of inspection stations throughout the colony. Because London Town was not on the list of approved sites, it could no longer participate in the tobacco trade. As for the merchants, as Annapolis grew in prominence and London Town faded, the merchants moved their main stores to Annapolis and eventually closed their old ones in London Town. And finally, as the main north-south route shifted farther west due to the increased colonization of the colonies' western reaches, less travelers through London Town caused a corresponding decrease in the number of public houses.

        By the end of the American Revolution, only the William Brown House, a few wooden structures, and the ferry remained as a testament to what had once been a thriving Chesapeake town and port.

      • art-n-janet
        I jsut have one made up. Since I ve been working full time, I don t have the opportunity to do a lot of sewing. Janet ... From: Tim
        Message 3 of 5 , Sep 15, 2011
          I jsut have one made up. Since I've been working full time,
          I don't have the opportunity to do a lot of sewing.

          Janet
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: Tim <tseasholtz@...>
          To: "Delval17thcentury@yahoogroups.com"
          <Delval17thcentury@yahoogroups.com>
          Subject: Re: [Delval17thcentury] Anne Arundel County Militia
          Muster 1683 - 1695 - Sept 17 and 18
          Date: Thu, 15 Sep 2011 10:36:12 -0400

          >Howdy Janet. Will you have weskits for sale?
          >Tim
          >
          >Sent from my iPhone
          >
          >On Sep 10, 2011, at 5:30 AM, "Janet Nickerson"
          ><art-n-janet@...> wrote:
          >
          >> I will be there both days, and will be bringing the shop.
          > I will need a 15 ft by 15ft space. Arthur will be there
          >> on Sunday.
          >> Janet
          >>
          >>
          >> ----- Original Message -----
          >> From: machatej
          >> To: Delval17thcentury@yahoogroups.com
          >> Sent: Thursday, September 08, 2011 8:04 PM
          >> Subject: [Delval17thcentury] Anne Arundel County Militia
          >> Muster 1683 - 1695 - Sept 17 and 18
          >>
          >> Anne Arundel County Militia Muster 1683 - 1695
          >>
          >> Date: Sept. 17 and 18, 2011. Arrival on the 16th is
          >> permitted, someone will be onsite to let people in.
          >> Location: Historic London Town and Gardens in Edgewater,
          >> MD. 839 Londontown Road, Edgewater, MD 21037
          >> Parking: Friday night and Sunday all parking is available
          >in the lot at the site. During the day on Saturday we will
          >need folks to park in the parking lot of a local nursing
          >home which is adjacent to the Anne Arundel County police
          >> station.
          >> Event Info: This is the first of what I hope is an annual
          >event at this site. We will be camped in the historic area
          >of the facility and drilling on a bluff over-looking the
          >South river. Locally there is plenty of eating and shopping
          >and the site has real bathrooms and wood for us to use.
          >Campfires will be permitted but no digging of fire pits as
          >> this is an archeological site with an active dig.
          >> Since this is the first time for this event I ask campers
          >to be patient in getting tents set-up. We will be setting
          >up the tents in a space between a fence and a garden, along
          >the back wall of the tenement house and if we need to we
          >can put some tents outside the fence line near the parking
          >> lot.
          >> London Town was the county seat from 1683-1695 and is the
          >site on which the local militia would have come for muster.
          >We are going to interpret for the public a local county
          >militia muster as it may have looked in the 1690's, from
          >the lack of training to the often poor weapon conditions
          >(matchlocks and flintlocks mixed) and of course the lack of
          >any uniform. We will be using the drill manual written by
          >> the rebel Duke of Monmouth to give us a baseline.
          >> For kit and camp we are looking for people to be wearing
          >clothing and be accoutered appropriately for the period of
          >> 1670 - 1700 in the English, Dutch and French colonies.
          >> Registration: There is no formal registration but if you
          >have a large tent or a large group I would like a heads up
          >> as to how many and how much space your tents will take.
          >> History of London Town, Maryland
          >>
          >> Though surveyed and patented by the English in the 1650s,
          >the land that would become London Town does not appear to
          >have been built upon until London Town was created by
          >legislation in 1683. This legislation, "An Act for
          >Advancement of Trade," created many towns and ports
          >throughout Maryland. Not only was London Town legislated
          >into existence at this time, it also became the county seat
          >> of Anne Arundel County.
          >> Archaeology and historical documents such as land records
          >, probate inventories, and other sources indicate that
          >London Town, paradoxically, did not begin to thrive until
          >after Annapolis became both Maryland's capital and Anne
          >Arundel's county seat in 1694. However, once the 18th
          >century began, London Town grew and thrived before fading
          >> away at the end of the century.
          >> Shipping records, court cases, land deeds, probate
          >inventories, newspaper advertisements, and the
          >archaeological record all indicate that London Town met
          >many needs during the 18th century. Many trans-Atlantic
          >tobacco ships would gather tobacco at London Town before
          >sailing to England and Europe where the tobacco was traded
          >for manufactured items, spices, and other goods from around
          >the globe. When these ships returned to the Chesapeake,
          >merchants based in London Town would advertise these wares
          >> in the Maryland Gazette.
          >> Additionally, London Town's placement on the South River
          >and on the main route between Boston, Massachusetts and
          >Charleston, South Carolina, meant that the public ferry
          >crossing was quite busy with travelers. Because all of
          >these travelers needed someplace to eat, drink, spend the
          >night, and get caught up on the latest news, London Town
          >> had between three and five public houses during its
          >> heyday. However, as the 18th century progressed, the
          >tobacco trade, merchants, and travelers that had been so
          >important to London Town's existence slowly became
          >decoupled from London Town. In 1747, legislation concerned
          >with the quality of Maryland's exported tobacco set up a
          >system of inspection stations throughout the colony.
          >Because London Town was not on the list of approved sites,
          >it could no longer participate in the tobacco trade. As for
          >the merchants, as Annapolis grew in prominence and London
          >Town faded, the merchants moved their main stores to
          >Annapolis and eventually closed their old ones in London
          >Town. And finally, as the main north-south route shifted
          >farther west due to the increased colonization of the
          >colonies' western reaches, less travelers through London
          >Town caused a corresponding decrease in the number of
          >> public houses.
          >> By the end of the American Revolution, only the William
          >Brown House, a few wooden structures, and the ferry
          >remained as a testament to what had once been a thriving
          >> Chesapeake town and port.
          >>
          >>
          >
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