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Re: [DebunkCreation] Big Space Rock

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  • Dave Oldridge
    ... I m pretty sure I saw one one night in 1967. I was working the midnight shift at Castelgar Airport in BC and it was my habit to open the inside door and
    Message 1 of 53 , Oct 1, 2004
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      On 30 Sep 2004 at 10:16, D. Keith Howington wrote:

      > Mike Sims wrote:
      >
      > > "No space rock this big will pass so close in the next century"
      > >
      > > How can anyone make this claim with any level of accuracy? Predicting
      > > 100 years into the future would require (in my mind) an enormous and
      > > precise view of all space debree flying within 100 years of travel to
      > > Earth.
      > >
      > > http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/toutatis_video_040929.html#video
      >
      > Your concern is well-founded, Mr. Sims.
      >
      > The statement should have been "no *known* space rock..."
      >
      > Asteroids generally range in orbits between Jupiter and Mercury with a
      > few outside either end. Most of them are in the famous Asteroid Belt
      > between Jupiter and Mars, and quite a few are elliptical enough in orbit
      > to cross the path of Earth. The ones of this size -- kilometer-plus --
      > we have a pretty good handle on. Smaller ones we do not, and
      > city-killers pass near Earth (within the orbit of the Moon) typically
      > several times per year.

      I'm pretty sure I saw one one night in 1967. I was working the midnight shift
      at Castelgar Airport in BC and it was my habit to open the inside door and turn
      the radios up and sit outside with a small telescope and binoculars on clear
      nights watching the satellites go by. And one night I was watching one of the
      big bright Echo birds go by when a dimmer object, tumbling rabidly, caught my
      attention moving south to north roughly. I followed it and timed it across a
      large stretch of sky between known fixed stars, then went inside and did a
      speed estimate. If it was as low as 90 miles, it was moving more than 40 miles
      per second. That means it was encountered wrong-way to and was at about the
      highest speed for such an object.

      Of course, as an observation, it was totally unrepeatable. You simply had to
      be there. And I have no idea really as to its real height and velocity. What
      I calculated is more or less a minimum. Any lower and, at these speeds, it
      would have been ablaze, but it was cold and spinning rapidly, whatever it was.
      And it's shape (as inferred from the changes in magnitude as it spun) was
      irregular.

      Dave Oldridge
      ICQ 1800667
      VA7CZ
    • Dave Oldridge
      ... I m pretty sure I saw one one night in 1967. I was working the midnight shift at Castelgar Airport in BC and it was my habit to open the inside door and
      Message 53 of 53 , Oct 1, 2004
      • 0 Attachment
        On 30 Sep 2004 at 10:16, D. Keith Howington wrote:

        > Mike Sims wrote:
        >
        > > "No space rock this big will pass so close in the next century"
        > >
        > > How can anyone make this claim with any level of accuracy? Predicting
        > > 100 years into the future would require (in my mind) an enormous and
        > > precise view of all space debree flying within 100 years of travel to
        > > Earth.
        > >
        > > http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/toutatis_video_040929.html#video
        >
        > Your concern is well-founded, Mr. Sims.
        >
        > The statement should have been "no *known* space rock..."
        >
        > Asteroids generally range in orbits between Jupiter and Mercury with a
        > few outside either end. Most of them are in the famous Asteroid Belt
        > between Jupiter and Mars, and quite a few are elliptical enough in orbit
        > to cross the path of Earth. The ones of this size -- kilometer-plus --
        > we have a pretty good handle on. Smaller ones we do not, and
        > city-killers pass near Earth (within the orbit of the Moon) typically
        > several times per year.

        I'm pretty sure I saw one one night in 1967. I was working the midnight shift
        at Castelgar Airport in BC and it was my habit to open the inside door and turn
        the radios up and sit outside with a small telescope and binoculars on clear
        nights watching the satellites go by. And one night I was watching one of the
        big bright Echo birds go by when a dimmer object, tumbling rabidly, caught my
        attention moving south to north roughly. I followed it and timed it across a
        large stretch of sky between known fixed stars, then went inside and did a
        speed estimate. If it was as low as 90 miles, it was moving more than 40 miles
        per second. That means it was encountered wrong-way to and was at about the
        highest speed for such an object.

        Of course, as an observation, it was totally unrepeatable. You simply had to
        be there. And I have no idea really as to its real height and velocity. What
        I calculated is more or less a minimum. Any lower and, at these speeds, it
        would have been ablaze, but it was cold and spinning rapidly, whatever it was.
        And it's shape (as inferred from the changes in magnitude as it spun) was
        irregular.

        Dave Oldridge
        ICQ 1800667
        VA7CZ
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