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Carl Wose dies

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  • Lenny Flank
    http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/01/science/carl-woese-dies-discovered-lifes-third-domain.html?hpw&_r=1& Carl Woese, a biophysicist and evolutionary
    Message 1 of 2 , Jan 2, 2013
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      http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/01/science/carl-woese-dies-discovered-lifes-third-domain.html?hpw&_r=1&

      Carl Woese, a biophysicist and evolutionary microbiologist whose discovery 35 years ago of a “third domain” of life in the vast realm of micro-organisms altered scientific understanding of evolution, died on Sunday at his home in Urbana, Ill. He was 84.

      In 1977, Dr. Woese and colleagues at the university startled the scientific world by announcing the discovery of what would be called archaea, a category of single-cell microbes genetically distinct from the two groups previously believed to comprise living organisms: prokaryotes, which include bacteria, and eukaryotes, which include plants and animals.

       
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      Lenny Flank
      "There are no loose threads in the web of life"

      Editor, Red and Black Publishers
      http://www.RedandBlackPublishers.com
    • David Windhorst
      ... When I was (briefly) a Bob Jones student in 1980, even their bio instructors were paying attention to Woese. dw On Wed, Jan 2, 2013 at 10:09 AM, Lenny
      Message 2 of 2 , Jan 2, 2013
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        On Wed, Jan 2, 2013 at 10:09 AM, Lenny Flank <lflank@...> wrote:
         



        Carl Woese, a biophysicist and evolutionary microbiologist whose discovery 35 years ago of a “third domain” of life in the vast realm of micro-organisms altered scientific understanding of evolution, died on Sunday at his home in Urbana, Ill. He was 84.

        In 1977, Dr. Woese and colleagues at the university startled the scientific world by announcing the discovery of what would be called archaea, a category of single-cell microbes genetically distinct from the two groups previously believed to comprise living organisms: prokaryotes, which include bacteria, and eukaryotes, which include plants and animals.


        When I was (briefly) a Bob Jones student in 1980, even their bio instructors were paying attention to Woese.

        dw
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