Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: The Klingon Language Institute

Expand Messages
  • Brian van der Spuy
    [[[Re: The Klingon Language Institute Posted by: Lenny Flank lflank@yahoo.com lflank Date: Mon Apr 30, 2012 12:39 pm ((PDT)) ... Sounds like Afrikaans,
    Message 1 of 21 , May 1, 2012
    • 0 Attachment
      [[[Re: The Klingon Language Institute
         Posted by: "Lenny Flank" lflank@... lflank
         Date: Mon Apr 30, 2012 12:39 pm ((PDT))
      >Ag! Magtag tog! Jou ma se moer ook!
      Sounds like Afrikaans, doesn't it.]]]

      ---Probably because of all the guttural Gs and rrrolled Rs in Afrikaans: we sound, in the immortal words of Douglas Adams, like someone trying to gargle whilst fighting off a pack of wolves. Well, he was talking about Vogons, but we're not all that different from them either.  :-)


      --
      Brian
      http://brianvds.blogspot.com/
      Gauteng fauna and flora:
      http://www.flickr.com/photos/10198799@N05/sets/72157629184822979/



    • Lenny Flank
        ... German and Russian have that same guttural quality.  I still remember one of my high school teachers saying to me, When you speak French, whatever you
      Message 2 of 21 , May 1, 2012
      • 0 Attachment
         
        > From: Brian van der Spuy <brianvds@...>

        >---Probably because of all the guttural Gs and rrrolled Rs in Afrikaans: we sound, in the immortal words of Douglas Adams, like someone trying to gargle whilst fighting off a pack of wolves. Well, he was talking about Vogons, but we're not all that different from them either.  :-)



        German and Russian have that same guttural quality.  I still remember one of my high school teachers saying to me, "When you speak French, whatever you say you sound like a romance movie.  When you speak German, whatever you say you sound like a warlord."

        (French and German was all my high school taught back in the 70's--presumably in case we had to re-fight the second world war. Looking back now I wish we had Spanish instead, that would have been far more useful.)

        ================================================
        Lenny Flank
        "There are no loose threads in the web of life"

        Editor, Red and Black Publishers 
        http://www.RedandBlackPublishers.com
      • David Windhorst
        ... I ll bet you a lump of putty that your poetry is better, though. dw
        Message 3 of 21 , May 1, 2012
        • 0 Attachment
          On Tue, May 1, 2012 at 6:25 AM, Brian van der Spuy <brianvds@...> wrote:
           

          [[[Re: The Klingon Language Institute
             Posted by: "Lenny Flank" lflank@... lflank
             Date: Mon Apr 30, 2012 12:39 pm ((PDT))
          >Ag! Magtag tog! Jou ma se moer ook!
          Sounds like Afrikaans, doesn't it.]]]


          ---Probably because of all the guttural Gs and rrrolled Rs in Afrikaans: we sound, in the immortal words of Douglas Adams, like someone trying to gargle whilst fighting off a pack of wolves. Well, he was talking about Vogons, but we're not all that different from them either.  :-)



          I'll bet you a lump of putty that your poetry is better, though.

          dw 
        • Roger
          ... Latin and French were my first two languages. Presumably the Latin was to help fight off another Roman invasion. Still, we really were taught to re-fight
          Message 4 of 21 , May 1, 2012
          • 0 Attachment
            --- In DebunkCreation@yahoogroups.com, Lenny Flank <lflank@...> wrote:
            >

            > (French and German was all my high school taught back in the 70's--presumably in case we had to re-fight the second world war. Looking back now I wish we had Spanish instead, that would have been far more useful.)
            >

            Latin and French were my first two languages. Presumably the Latin was to help fight off another Roman invasion.

            Still, we really were taught to re-fight WW2 (heck, WW1) at school in the late 60s and early 70s. Compulsory military training complete with WW1 standard issue Lee Enfield .303 rifles and the world's most ill-fitting army dress uniforms, left over from WW2.
          • Lenny Flank
            ... Too funny. To fight off the invading Soviet hordes, no doubt. . .  It takes preparing to fight the last war to a whole new level of absurdity. Of
            Message 5 of 21 , May 1, 2012
            • 0 Attachment
              > From: Roger <stanyardroger@...>
              >
              > Still, we really were taught to re-fight WW2 (heck, WW1) at school in the late
              > 60s and early 70s. Compulsory military training complete with WW1 standard issue
              > Lee Enfield .303 rifles and the world's most ill-fitting army dress
              > uniforms, left over from WW2.


              Too funny. To fight off the invading Soviet hordes, no doubt. . . 

              It takes "preparing to fight the last war" to a whole new level of absurdity.



              Of course we in the US are still aiming our military budget and hardware towards fighting the USSR, which ceased to exist about 20 years ago. So we are right there too in the ranks of the absurd.

              ================================================
              Lenny Flank
              "There are no loose threads in the web of life"

              Editor, Red and Black Publishers 
              http://www.RedandBlackPublishers.com
            • JTG
              Good grief - you too Roger? John Germain Jersey British Channel Islands ... late
              Message 6 of 21 , May 1, 2012
              • 0 Attachment
                Good grief - you too Roger?

                John Germain

                Jersey
                British Channel Islands

                > -----Original Message-----
                > From: DebunkCreation@yahoogroups.com
                > [mailto:DebunkCreation@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Roger
                > Sent: 01 May 2012 16:20
                > To: DebunkCreation@yahoogroups.com
                > Subject: [DebunkCreation] Re: The Klingon Language Institute
                >
                >
                >
                > --- In DebunkCreation@yahoogroups.com, Lenny Flank <lflank@...> wrote:
                > >
                >
                > > (French and German was all my high school taught back in the 70's--
                > presumably in case we had to re-fight the second world war. Looking back
                > now I wish we had Spanish instead, that would have been far more useful.)
                > >
                >
                > Latin and French were my first two languages. Presumably the Latin was to
                > help fight off another Roman invasion.
                >
                > Still, we really were taught to re-fight WW2 (heck, WW1) at school in the
                late
                > 60s and early 70s. Compulsory military training complete with WW1 standard
                > issue Lee Enfield .303 rifles and the world's most ill-fitting army dress
                > uniforms, left over from WW2.
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > ------------------------------------
                >
                > Yahoo! Groups Links
                >
                >
                >
              • Mikey Brass
                I am a big fan of teaching Latin in schools. Mandarin and another language besides English should also be compulsory. Sent from my Windows Phone From: JTG
                Message 7 of 21 , May 1, 2012
                • 0 Attachment
                  I am a big fan of teaching Latin in schools. Mandarin and another
                  language besides English should also be compulsory.

                  Sent from my Windows Phone
                  From: JTG
                  Sent: 01/05/2012 18:04
                  To: DebunkCreation@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: RE: [DebunkCreation] Re: The Klingon Language Institute
                  Good grief - you too Roger?

                  John Germain

                  Jersey
                  British Channel Islands

                  > -----Original Message-----
                  > From: DebunkCreation@yahoogroups.com
                  > [mailto:DebunkCreation@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Roger
                  > Sent: 01 May 2012 16:20
                  > To: DebunkCreation@yahoogroups.com
                  > Subject: [DebunkCreation] Re: The Klingon Language Institute
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > --- In DebunkCreation@yahoogroups.com, Lenny Flank <lflank@...> wrote:
                  > >
                  >
                  > > (French and German was all my high school taught back in the 70's--
                  > presumably in case we had to re-fight the second world war. Looking back
                  > now I wish we had Spanish instead, that would have been far more useful.)
                  > >
                  >
                  > Latin and French were my first two languages. Presumably the Latin was to
                  > help fight off another Roman invasion.
                  >
                  > Still, we really were taught to re-fight WW2 (heck, WW1) at school in the
                  late
                  > 60s and early 70s. Compulsory military training complete with WW1 standard
                  > issue Lee Enfield .303 rifles and the world's most ill-fitting army dress
                  > uniforms, left over from WW2.
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > ------------------------------------
                  >
                  > Yahoo! Groups Links
                  >
                  >
                  >



                  ------------------------------------

                  Yahoo! Groups Links
                • Richard Ruppel
                  From: Lenny Flank Sent: Tuesday, May 01, 2012 8:30 AM To: DebunkCreation@yahoogroups.com Subject: Re: [DebunkCreation] Re: The Klingon Language Institute ...
                  Message 8 of 21 , May 1, 2012
                  • 0 Attachment
                     
                     
                    Sent: Tuesday, May 01, 2012 8:30 AM
                    Subject: Re: [DebunkCreation] Re: The Klingon Language Institute
                     
                     



                    > From: Roger <
                    href="mailto:stanyardroger%40yahoo.co.uk">mailto:stanyardroger%40yahoo.co.uk>
                    >
                    > Still, we really were taught to re-fight WW2 (heck, WW1) at school in
                    the late
                    > 60s and early 70s. Compulsory military training complete with
                    WW1 standard issue
                    > Lee Enfield .303 rifles and the world's most
                    ill-fitting army dress
                    > uniforms, left over from WW2.

                    Too funny. To fight off the invading Soviet hordes, no doubt. . .

                    It takes "preparing to fight the last war" to a whole new level of absurdity.

                    Of course we in the US are still aiming our military budget and hardware towards fighting the USSR, which ceased to exist about 20 years ago. So we are right there too in the ranks of the absurd.

                    ================================================
                    Lenny Flank
                    "There are no loose threads in the web of life"

                    Ruppel:  You’ve been listening to Romney, haven’t you?  <g>

                  • David Windhorst
                    ... Speaking of invading hordes, WWII, ill-fitting uniforms, and even homespun movie FX, I couldn t resist watching this on Netflix a couple weeks ago. Mostly
                    Message 9 of 21 , May 1, 2012
                    • 0 Attachment
                      On Tue, May 1, 2012 at 11:30 AM, Lenny Flank <lflank@...> wrote:
                       



                      > From: Roger <stanyardroger@...>
                      >
                      > Still, we really were taught to re-fight WW2 (heck, WW1) at school in the late
                      > 60s and early 70s. Compulsory military training complete with WW1 standard issue
                      > Lee Enfield .303 rifles and the world's most ill-fitting army dress
                      > uniforms, left over from WW2.

                      Too funny. To fight off the invading Soviet hordes, no doubt. . . 

                      It takes "preparing to fight the last war" to a whole new level of absurdity.

                      Of course we in the US are still aiming our military budget and hardware towards fighting the USSR, which ceased to exist about 20 years ago. So we are right there too in the ranks of the absurd.


                      Speaking of invading hordes, WWII, ill-fitting uniforms, and even homespun movie FX, I couldn't resist watching this on Netflix a couple weeks ago.  Mostly silly, often sophomoric, but it had a few worthwhile moments; would have played better as a short than a full-length feature:

                      "Jackboots on Whitehall" trailer


                      dw 
                    • Lenny Flank
                        ... By golly, even MY movies have bigger budgets than this one . . . ================================================ Lenny Flank There are no loose
                      Message 10 of 21 , May 1, 2012
                      • 0 Attachment
                         
                        > From: David Windhorst <dbwindhorst@...>

                        >Speaking of invading hordes, WWII, ill-fitting uniforms, and even homespun movie FX, I couldn't resist watching this on Netflix a couple weeks ago.  Mostly silly, often sophomoric, but it had a few worthwhile moments; would have played better as a short than a full-length feature:



                        By golly, even MY movies have bigger budgets than this one . . .



                        ================================================
                        Lenny Flank
                        "There are no loose threads in the web of life"

                        Editor, Red and Black Publishers 

                        http://www.RedandBlackPublishers.com
                      • David Windhorst
                        ... I don t know, man -- all those (Klaus) Barbie bustiers in the Hadrian s Wall sequence probably didn t come cheap. Been meaning to ask: where d you source
                        Message 11 of 21 , May 1, 2012
                        • 0 Attachment
                          On Tue, May 1, 2012 at 2:02 PM, Lenny Flank <lflank@...> wrote:
                           

                           
                          > From: David Windhorst <dbwindhorst@...>

                          >Speaking of invading hordes, WWII, ill-fitting uniforms, and even homespun movie FX, I couldn't resist watching this on Netflix a couple weeks ago.  Mostly silly, often sophomoric, but it had a few worthwhile moments; would have played better as a short than a full-length feature:

                          By golly, even MY movies have bigger budgets than this one . . .


                          I don't know, man -- all those (Klaus) Barbie bustiers in the Hadrian's Wall sequence probably didn't come cheap.

                          Been meaning to ask: where'd you source the masks for "The Hunt"?  That final shot sure incorporated an ambitious number of characters & costumes; pretty cool.  The only one I maybe recognized was "The Fly" on the rightmost.  And the Starfleet alien looked familiar, but I just couldn't place it.

                          dw 
                        • Lenny Flank
                            ... Almost all of them are Halloween masks that I got on Amazon. One of the Pred masks I made from posterboard, one of the others is a modified
                          Message 12 of 21 , May 1, 2012
                          • 0 Attachment
                             
                            > From: David Windhorst <dbwindhorst@...>

                            >Been meaning to ask: where'd you source the masks for "The Hunt"?  That final shot sure incorporated an ambitious number of characters & costumes; pretty cool.  The only one I maybe recognized was "The Fly" on the rightmost.  And the Starfleet alien looked familiar, but I just couldn't place it.


                            Almost all of them are Halloween masks that I got on Amazon. One of the Pred masks I made from posterboard, one of the others is a modified bubble-package for another mask, and the third is a modified Rubies costume mask.



                            ================================================
                            Lenny Flank
                            "There are no loose threads in the web of life"

                            Editor, Red and Black Publishers 
                            http://www.RedandBlackPublishers.com
                          • Lenny Flank
                              ... That last scene was a huge pain to shoot, btw.  Even though it was only five seconds of film time, it took two days to shoot it because I had to suit
                            Message 13 of 21 , May 1, 2012
                            • 0 Attachment
                               

                              >> From: David Windhorst <dbwindhorst@...>

                              > That final shot sure incorporated an ambitious number of characters
                              > & costumes; pretty cool. 


                              That last scene was a huge pain to shoot, btw.  Even though it was only five seconds of film time, it took two days to shoot it because I had to suit up for one costume, shoot my five seconds, then change into another costume, then another, then another . . .  .  And of course the light from the window in my apartment is only good around two hours a day.


                              ================================================
                              Lenny Flank
                              "There are no loose threads in the web of life"

                              Editor, Red and Black Publishers 
                              http://www.RedandBlackPublishers.com

                            • Brian van der Spuy
                              [[[ Re: The Klingon Language Institute Posted by: David Windhorst dbwindhorst@gmail.com david_windhorst Date: Tue May 1, 2012 5:48 am ((PDT)) I ll bet you a
                              Message 14 of 21 , May 2, 2012
                              • 0 Attachment
                                [[[ Re: The Klingon Language Institute
                                   Posted by: "David Windhorst" dbwindhorst@... david_windhorst
                                   Date: Tue May 1, 2012 5:48 am ((PDT))
                                I'll bet you a lump of putty that your poetry is better, though.]]]

                                ---It is indeed, or at least some of it, but being better than Vogon poetry doesn't tell you much, does it? Unfortunately it is almost impossible to effectively translate poetry, otherwise I could have proven that it is vastly better than poetry in any other language. 

                                It's a weird thing: I have long battled to get poetry. I read a poem over and over, and cannot for the life of me work out what any of it means. But I was reading the wrong poetry: I tried to get poems by all the great masters of English poetry. It turns out I only get poems in my mother tongue, and some of them I get in a big way. Something I discovered only recently!
                              • Brian van der Spuy
                                [[[Re: The Klingon Language Institute Posted by: Roger stanyardroger@yahoo.co.uk stanyardroger Date: Tue May 1, 2012 8:19 am ((PDT)) Latin and French were my
                                Message 15 of 21 , May 2, 2012
                                • 0 Attachment
                                  [[[Re: The Klingon Language Institute
                                     Posted by: "Roger" stanyardroger@... stanyardroger
                                     Date: Tue May 1, 2012 8:19 am ((PDT))
                                  Latin and French were my first two languages. Presumably the Latin was to help fight off another Roman invasion.]]]

                                  ---I'm told Latin is a good language to give you a general underpinning in European languages. My brother took a year or two of it because it was required in his legal studies. When he first visited Mozambique, years later, he found to his pleasant surprise that he could sort of read the Portuguese newspapers there. I notice that Mikey is also in favour of it being taught - perhaps he'll tell us more. I'm sure he is also a very big fan of the idea of making hieroglyphics a compulsory school subject. :-)

                                  Me, I'm in favour of closing down the damn schools, considering what they inflicted upon me and are still inflicting upon the nation's youth, but then I'll be without a job. Catch-22.

                                  [[[Still, we really were taught to re-fight WW2 (heck, WW1) at school in the late 60s and early 70s. Compulsory military training complete with WW1 standard issue Lee Enfield .303 rifles and the world's most ill-fitting army dress uniforms, left over from WW2.]]]

                                  ---Hah, we here in apartheid South Africa were far more advanced: we were fighting the Cold War. Cadet training was compulsory in high school (Friday was cadet day, and we even wore military style uniforms and berets on that day - rather chillingly close to a sort of compulsory Hitler Youth thing), and after that I was conscripted into the army for two years. The very thought of all that time that was wasted and that I can never get back, and all the nonsense I was fed so that to this very day I have to work at de-programming myself, makes me entertain some pretty murderous thoughts sometimes. And then they say I benefited from apartheid? Nobody did, except the few assholes in charge. Or put a different way, I certainly benefited in some ways, but considering the personal price I had to pay for it, and that millions of my fellow citizens had to pay, I would have gladly handed the benefits back if I could.


                                  --
                                  Brian
                                  http://brianvds.blogspot.com/
                                  Gauteng fauna and flora:
                                  http://www.flickr.com/photos/10198799@N05/sets/72157629184822979/



                                • Mikey Brass
                                  I suck at languages. I have some kind of mental problem learning other languages orally. Latin is not only the basis for many European languages and has great
                                  Message 16 of 21 , May 2, 2012
                                  • 0 Attachment

                                    I suck at languages. I have some kind of mental problem learning other languages orally. Latin is not only the basis for many European languages and has great influence on others like English, learning Latin sheds light on and makes learning English easier. It would be the same for learning Latin and Italian or Latin and French.

                                    It has produced some of the best writings in history, which continue to influence us to this day in various forms.

                                    Learning Latin is learning part of history and the present.

                                    Sent from my Windows Phone

                                    From: Brian van der Spuy
                                    Sent: 02/05/2012 10:38
                                    To: debunkcreation
                                    Subject: [DebunkCreation] Re: The Klingon Language Institute



                                    [[[Re: The Klingon Language Institute
                                       Posted by: "Roger" stanyardroger@... stanyardroger
                                       Date: Tue May 1, 2012 8:19 am ((PDT))
                                    Latin and French were my first two languages. Presumably the Latin was to help fight off another Roman invasion.]]]

                                    ---I'm told Latin is a good language to give you a general underpinning in European languages. My brother took a year or two of it because it was required in his legal studies. When he first visited Mozambique, years later, he found to his pleasant surprise that he could sort of read the Portuguese newspapers there. I notice that Mikey is also in favour of it being taught - perhaps he'll tell us more. I'm sure he is also a very big fan of the idea of making hieroglyphics a compulsory school subject. :-)

                                    Me, I'm in favour of closing down the damn schools, considering what they inflicted upon me and are still inflicting upon the nation's youth, but then I'll be without a job. Catch-22.

                                    [[[Still, we really were taught to re-fight WW2 (heck, WW1) at school in the late 60s and early 70s. Compulsory military training complete with WW1 standard issue Lee Enfield .303 rifles and the world's most ill-fitting army dress uniforms, left over from WW2.]]]

                                    ---Hah, we here in apartheid South Africa were far more advanced: we were fighting the Cold War. Cadet training was compulsory in high school (Friday was cadet day, and we even wore military style uniforms and berets on that day - rather chillingly close to a sort of compulsory Hitler Youth thing), and after that I was conscripted into the army for two years. The very thought of all that time that was wasted and that I can never get back, and all the nonsense I was fed so that to this very day I have to work at de-programming myself, makes me entertain some pretty murderous thoughts sometimes. And then they say I benefited from apartheid? Nobody did, except the few assholes in charge. Or put a different way, I certainly benefited in some ways, but considering the personal price I had to pay for it, and that millions of my fellow citizens had to pay, I would have gladly handed the benefits back if I could.


                                    --
                                    Brian
                                    http://brianvds.blogspot.com/
                                    Gauteng fauna and flora:
                                    http://www.flickr.com/photos/10198799@N05/sets/72157629184822979/





                                  • Rudy Vonk
                                    ... I completely agree with the importance of Latin. Apart from being the ancestor of all Romance languages (through the so-called vulgar Latin ), it
                                    Message 17 of 21 , May 3, 2012
                                    • 0 Attachment
                                      On 02/05/12 19:28, Mikey Brass wrote:
                                      > Latin is not only the basis for many European languages and has great
                                      > influence on others like English, learning Latin sheds light on and
                                      > makes learning English easier. It would be the same for learning Latin
                                      > and Italian or Latin and French.

                                      I completely agree with the importance of Latin. Apart from being the
                                      ancestor of all Romance languages (through the so-called "vulgar
                                      Latin"), it familiarizes the student with concepts like case, all but
                                      extinct in modern English, French and Dutch, for instance, but very
                                      present in many others such as German, the Slavic languages, Greek, etc.
                                      Exposure to the extremely liberal word order also helps ferret out
                                      subjects and predicates smeared al over a sentence in other languages,
                                      as I found out to my surprise in a Dutch (!) text for my university
                                      entrance exams. Thanks to Latin, I became fluent in Italian in the
                                      equivalent of 21 days.


                                      > It has produced some of the best writings in history, which continue
                                      > to influence us to this day in various forms.


                                      The diet of Caesar, Ovid, Livy, Cicero and Horace (over five of six
                                      years) helped me achieve the unthinkable: enjoy my secondary education!


                                      --
                                      ____________________________
                                      Rudy Vonk
                                      Oviedo, Spain
                                      <rudy@...>
                                      +34 607 354100

                                      You can't always want what you get
                                      ____________________________
                                    • Roger
                                      ... The absurdity was that the British army was utterly class-ridden at the time. I was at a grammar school which was for the top 20% of pupils from age 11.
                                      Message 18 of 21 , May 3, 2012
                                      • 0 Attachment
                                        --- In DebunkCreation@yahoogroups.com, Brian van der Spuy <brianvds@...> wrote:
                                        >
                                        > [[[Re: The Klingon Language Institute
                                        > Posted by: "Roger" stanyardroger@... stanyardroger
                                        > Date: Tue May 1, 2012 8:19 am ((PDT))
                                        > Latin and French were my first two languages. Presumably the Latin was to
                                        > help fight off another Roman invasion.]]]
                                        >
                                        > ---I'm told Latin is a good language to give you a general underpinning in
                                        > European languages. My brother took a year or two of it because it was
                                        > required in his legal studies. When he first visited Mozambique, years
                                        > later, he found to his pleasant surprise that he could sort of read the
                                        > Portuguese newspapers there. I notice that Mikey is also in favour of it
                                        > being taught - perhaps he'll tell us more. I'm sure he is also a very big
                                        > fan of the idea of making hieroglyphics a compulsory school subject. :-)
                                        >
                                        > Me, I'm in favour of closing down the damn schools, considering what they
                                        > inflicted upon me and are still inflicting upon the nation's youth, but
                                        > then I'll be without a job. Catch-22.
                                        >
                                        > [[[Still, we really were taught to re-fight WW2 (heck, WW1) at school in
                                        > the late 60s and early 70s. Compulsory military training complete with WW1
                                        > standard issue Lee Enfield .303 rifles and the world's most ill-fitting
                                        > army dress uniforms, left over from WW2.]]]
                                        >
                                        > ---Hah, we here in apartheid South Africa were far more advanced: we were
                                        > fighting the Cold War. Cadet training was compulsory in high school (Friday
                                        > was cadet day, and we even wore military style uniforms and berets on that
                                        > day - rather chillingly close to a sort of compulsory Hitler Youth thing),
                                        > and after that I was conscripted into the army for two years. The very
                                        > thought of all that time that was wasted and that I can never get back, and
                                        > all the nonsense I was fed so that to this very day I have to work at
                                        > de-programming myself, makes me entertain some pretty murderous thoughts
                                        > sometimes. And then they say I benefited from apartheid? Nobody did, except
                                        > the few assholes in charge. Or put a different way, I certainly benefited
                                        > in some ways, but considering the personal price I had to pay for it, and
                                        > that millions of my fellow citizens had to pay, I would have gladly handed
                                        > the benefits back if I could.
                                        >

                                        The absurdity was that the British army was utterly class-ridden at the time. I was at a grammar school which was for the "top" 20% of pupils from age 11. But we we part of the combined cadet force whereas those that went to private schools were part of the officer training corps. If we joined the army the assumption was that we were fit only for the ranks. The officer corps of the army had the unenviable reputation of being a method of outdoor relief for the dim end of the private education system, people too stupid to make it into a grammar school.

                                        Of course, nobody at my school took the cadet corps as anything but a complete idiotic wast of time.
                                      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.