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Re: Garage sale?

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  • Brian van der Spuy
    [[[Re: Garage sale? Posted by: Lenny Flank lflank@yahoo.com lflank Date: Tue Nov 30, 2010 8:23 am ((PST)) I think most of the appeal for rich people paying
    Message 1 of 5 , Dec 1, 2010
      [[[Re: Garage sale?
      Posted by: "Lenny Flank" lflank@... lflank
      Date: Tue Nov 30, 2010 8:23 am ((PST))
      I think most of the appeal for rich people paying absurd prices for
      useless things like expensive cars, mansions or art, is the "snob
      factor"--its simply to brag to the world "ha ha, I can afford to waste
      my money on this, and you can't."
      That's the only reason I can think for buying a sports car that does
      180mph--buit in which you get arrested if you go over 70.
      Silly waste of resources.]]]

      ---Yes, that is the impression I also get: such things are, to some
      extent, a sort of peacock's tail. Not that I would reject the notion
      of spoiling oneself with any luxuries at all, including some fairly
      expensive ones. You after all spend considerable amounts of money on
      making SF fan flics, and you are hardly a rich prick trying to show
      off. Similarly, I don't think there is anything wrong with paying,
      say, several thousand dollars for an original painting, or a similar
      amount on a telescope or a musical instrument.

      Such luxuries are inevitably not cheap. If artists are to make a
      living at all, they HAVE to get a month's worth of salary for a
      painting that took a month to complete (as is the case with highly
      realistically rendered works.) Presumably, other such things that cost
      several thousand dollars also cost that much because that simply is
      what they cost; I don't think an amateur astronomer will any time soon
      get a decent telescope for less, or an aspiring pianist a piano (or
      whatever).

      But as you say, it gets a bit sick when it becomes clear that the only
      point of the exercise is not to enrich one's intellectual or spiritual
      life, but literally simply to show off. Thus the world's best amateur
      telescopes tend to be in the homes of people who have never used them
      more than once or twice, until they got bored with the new toy, the
      most expensive paintings are housed in vaults where no one ever sees
      them, and the fastest cars may not be driven at that speed anyway. In
      short, as you pointed out, a silly waste of resources.





      --
      Brian
      http://brianvds.livejournal.com/
    • Roger
      ... Yer, dead right there Lenny. They should buy the latest in American technology of the 21st century instead. A full size replica Noah s Ark. That ll really
      Message 2 of 5 , Dec 2, 2010
        --- In DebunkCreation@yahoogroups.com, Lenny Flank <lflank@...> wrote:
        >
        > I think most of the appeal for rich people paying absurd prices for useless things like expensive cars, mansions or art, is the "snob factor"--its simply to brag to the world "ha ha, I can afford to waste my money on this, and you can't."
        >
        > That's the only reason I can think for buying a sports car that does 180mph--buit in which you get arrested if you go over 70.
        >
        > Silly waste of resources.
        >
        > Lenny Flank
        >

        Yer, dead right there Lenny.

        They should buy the latest in American technology of the 21st century instead. A full size replica Noah's Ark. That'll really impress the neighbours. Sail 'em down to Cannes and be the talk of the town!
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