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Re: Read any good books lately? [Patriarchal Adventures! Preface and More]

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  • Mark
    Hello Brian, Speaking of good books to read, I have been recommending a particular book on the beginnings of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. That is the
    Message 1 of 8 , Apr 1, 2010
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      Hello Brian,
      Speaking of good books to read, I have been recommending a particular book on the beginnings of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.  That is the biblical patriarchs.  The book puts forth some well articulated and detailed hypothesis about the biblical patriarchs.  This it the most engaging work I have ever read on biblical matters, and far more interesting than anything I have read on Jesus and Christianity.  Because I enjoyed reading it so much I purchased more books that I offer to a few persons interesting in reading.  I would be particularly interested in others opinions.  I was able to find a preface online, and about a hundred pages available online starting at chapter 2, where the authors most origional content on the patriarchs begins. 

      Hello Howard,
      There is a book I read a few years ago that really intrigued me.  The book advocates some passionately articulated hypotheses about the behaviour of the biblical patriarchs.  Though the title of the book is not genious, the hypotheses are, even if they are completely wrong.  The general hypothesis of this book, though might sound unbelievable if one was told outright with no explanation, I found very convincing in many respects.  In any event this is the most engaging book I have ever read.  Because I enjoyed it so much, I had purchased a number of books when they were available by the author at a good price.  I have been quite interested in getting opinions on the book, but I know a lot of people are very busy.  I do think you would really enjoy reading it.  I have books to give away for free to ones interested.  I gave one to David Neuman some time ago and I think he was quite impressed.  Here are some sources I could come accross where portions of the book can be accessed easily and free.  Don't feel obligated to reply I just provide this in case you are interested.
      Mark

      http://www.booktalk.org/nominations-for-our-september-october-book-poll-t173.html  This contains the Table of Contents and Preface.  Scroll down just a little bit and you will see the Table of Contents.  The Preface is just below.

      http://www2.xlibris.com/book_excerpt.asp?bookid=18252  This link gives almost 100 pages starting at chapter 2.  Chapter 2 begins the origional theses of his book.

      http://www2.xlibris.com/bookstore/bookdisplay.aspx?bookid=18252  The previous link was derived from here, the book publisher.



      --- In DebunkCreation@yahoogroups.com, "bikerpenguin66" <bneville66@...> wrote:
      >
      > I saw in the files section there was a list of books, but the list is from 2005. Anything new to add?
      >
      > I've just read:
      >
      > "Where Darwin Meets the Bible. Creationists and Evolutionists in America", by Larry Witham. Nothing of any real interest, mostly an overview of what the two sides think. Doesn't really promote one or the other, but seems to come down a bit more in favor of evolution.
      >
      > "The Genesis Enigma. Why the Bible is Scientifically Accurate", by Andrew Parker. OK, after you stop laughing, it actually wasn't too bad. I was expecting typical fundamentalist/creationist junk, but it actually lays out a decent history of evolution and some key events. What the author does try to do is say that the authors of Genesis had some special knowledge that they may not have been able to understand, but somehow put into terms people of the time could. I.E. "Let the earth bring forth grass" is the development of photosynthesis and "lights to divide the day from night" is the development of the eye to distinguish light from dark. So, yes, a typical "let's make the evidence fit what I think" and a real stretch of the imagination, but not a bad argument that evolution could be guided by (insert deity here).
      >
      > The Supersense : Why We Believe in the Unbelievable, by Bruce Hood. Talks about why people believe in psychic abilities, the paranormal and the like (briefly talks about creationism), but no real science in it. Mostly anecdotal studies. Not all that interesting.
      >
      > -brian
      > ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      > "I didn't create the term `creation science.' If you had called it creation magic, or creation mysticism, or creation mythology, we wouldn't even be having this discussion. But you people called it creation science. Now I have to respond. So I'm sorry if you're offended, but I'm deeply offended by your calling what is essentially magic, science" - Joseph D. McInerney.
      >
    • Mark
      Oops. While I sent the previous slightly prematurely, everything is there. I give away books at no cost to a few interested persons. When I say this book is
      Message 2 of 8 , Apr 1, 2010
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        Oops.  While I sent the previous slightly prematurely, everything is there.  I give away books at no cost to a few interested persons.  When I say this book is engaging I say that as a highly creative and origional person who is typically less enamored with the creativity of others.
        Mark

        http://www.booktalk.org/nominations-for-our-september-october-book-poll-t173.html  This contains the Table of Contents and Preface.  Scroll down just a little bit and you will see the Table of Contents.  The Preface is just below.

        http://www2.xlibris.com/book_excerpt.asp?bookid=18252  This link gives almost 100 pages starting at chapter 2.  Chapter 2 begins the origional theses of his book.

        http://www2.xlibris.com/bookstore/bookdisplay.aspx?bookid=18252  The previous link was derived from here, the book publisher.
      • Roger
        ... Sounds seriously interesting. :-( I must spend Easter reading them.... On second thoughts, sod it. I m off down the pub.
        Message 3 of 8 , Apr 1, 2010
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          --- In DebunkCreation@yahoogroups.com, "Mark" <gawwwrrsh@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hello Brian,
          > Speaking of good books to read, I have been recommending a particular
          > book on the beginnings of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. That is the
          > biblical patriarchs. The book puts forth some well articulated and
          > detailed hypothesis about the biblical patriarchs. This it the most
          > engaging work I have ever read on biblical matters, and far more
          > interesting than anything I have read on Jesus and Christianity.
          > Because I enjoyed reading it so much I purchased more books that I offer
          > to a few persons interesting in reading. I would be particularly
          > interested in others opinions. I was able to find a preface online, and
          > about a hundred pages available online starting at chapter 2, where the
          > authors most origional content on the patriarchs begins.
          >
          > Hello Howard,
          > There is a book I read a few years ago that really intrigued me. The
          > book advocates some passionately articulated hypotheses about the
          > behaviour of the biblical patriarchs. Though the title of the book is
          > not genious, the hypotheses are, even if they are completely wrong. The
          > general hypothesis of this book, though might sound unbelievable if one
          > was told outright with no explanation, I found very convincing in many
          > respects. In any event this is the most engaging book I have ever read.
          > Because I enjoyed it so much, I had purchased a number of books when
          > they were available by the author at a good price. I have been quite
          > interested in getting opinions on the book, but I know a lot of people
          > are very busy. I do think you would really enjoy reading it. I have
          > books to give away for free to ones interested. I gave one to David
          > Neuman some time ago and I think he was quite impressed. Here are some
          > sources I could come accross where portions of the book can be accessed
          > easily and free. Don't feel obligated to reply I just provide this in
          > case you are interested.
          > Mark
          >
          > http://www.booktalk.org/nominations-for-our-september-october-book-

          Sounds seriously interesting. :-( I must spend Easter reading them....

          On second thoughts, sod it. I'm off down the pub.
        • buck12ga2000
          ... from 2005. Anything new to add? ... America , by Larry Witham. Nothing of any real interest, mostly an overview of what the two sides think. Doesn t really
          Message 4 of 8 , Apr 1, 2010
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            --- In DebunkCreation@yahoogroups.com, "bikerpenguin66" <bneville66@...> wrote:
            >
            > I saw in the files section there was a list of books, but the list is from 2005. Anything new to add?
            >
            > I've just read:
            >
            > "Where Darwin Meets the Bible. Creationists and Evolutionists in America", by Larry Witham. Nothing of any real interest, mostly an overview of what the two sides think. Doesn't really promote one or the other, but seems to come down a bit more in favor of evolution.
            >
            > "The Genesis Enigma. Why the Bible is Scientifically Accurate", by Andrew Parker. OK, after you stop laughing, it actually wasn't too bad. I was expecting typical fundamentalist/creationist junk, but it actually lays out a decent history of evolution and some key events. What the author does try to do is say that the authors of Genesis had some special knowledge that they may not have been able to understand, but somehow put into terms people of the time could. I.E. "Let the earth bring forth grass" is the development of photosynthesis and "lights to divide the day from night" is the development of the eye to distinguish light from dark. So, yes, a typical "let's make the evidence fit what I think" and a real stretch of the imagination, but not a bad argument that evolution could be guided by (insert deity here).
            >
            > The Supersense : Why We Believe in the Unbelievable, by Bruce Hood. Talks about why people believe in psychic abilities, the paranormal and the like (briefly talks about creationism), but no real science in it. Mostly anecdotal studies. Not all that interesting.
            >
            > -brian
            > ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
            > "I didn't create the term `creation science.' If you had called it creation magic, or creation mysticism, or creation mythology, we wouldn't even be having this discussion. But you people called it creation science. Now I have to respond. So I'm sorry if you're offended, but I'm deeply offended by your calling what is essentially magic, science" - Joseph D. McInerney.
            >
            I'm into fiction-novels. Over the past year I've been reading all the books by John Irving. John brings us a unique perspective, to say the least. Interesting characters and highly entertaining. My favorite is probably Cider House Rules.

            I'm also reading all the books by Jeffery Deavers.  

            Buck

          • Mark
            Well, OK then! Miss out on all the fun! See if I care! :P Mark ... particular ... the ... offer ... and ... the ... The ... is ... The ... one ... many ...
            Message 5 of 8 , Apr 4, 2010
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              Well, OK then! Miss out on all the fun! See if I care! :P
              Mark


              --- In DebunkCreation@yahoogroups.com, "Roger" <stanyardroger@...>
              wrote:
              >
              >
              >
              > --- In DebunkCreation@yahoogroups.com, "Mark" gawwwrrsh@ wrote:
              > >
              > > Hello Brian,
              > > Speaking of good books to read, I have been recommending a
              particular
              > > book on the beginnings of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. That is
              the
              > > biblical patriarchs. The book puts forth some well articulated and
              > > detailed hypothesis about the biblical patriarchs. This it the most
              > > engaging work I have ever read on biblical matters, and far more
              > > interesting than anything I have read on Jesus and Christianity.
              > > Because I enjoyed reading it so much I purchased more books that I
              offer
              > > to a few persons interesting in reading. I would be particularly
              > > interested in others opinions. I was able to find a preface online,
              and
              > > about a hundred pages available online starting at chapter 2, where
              the
              > > authors most origional content on the patriarchs begins.
              > >
              > > Hello Howard,
              > > There is a book I read a few years ago that really intrigued me.
              The
              > > book advocates some passionately articulated hypotheses about the
              > > behaviour of the biblical patriarchs. Though the title of the book
              is
              > > not genious, the hypotheses are, even if they are completely wrong.
              The
              > > general hypothesis of this book, though might sound unbelievable if
              one
              > > was told outright with no explanation, I found very convincing in
              many
              > > respects. In any event this is the most engaging book I have ever
              read.
              > > Because I enjoyed it so much, I had purchased a number of books when
              > > they were available by the author at a good price. I have been
              quite
              > > interested in getting opinions on the book, but I know a lot of
              people
              > > are very busy. I do think you would really enjoy reading it. I
              have
              > > books to give away for free to ones interested. I gave one to David
              > > Neuman some time ago and I think he was quite impressed. Here are
              some
              > > sources I could come accross where portions of the book can be
              accessed
              > > easily and free. Don't feel obligated to reply I just provide this
              in
              > > case you are interested.
              > > Mark
              > >
              > > http://www.booktalk.org/nominations-for-our-september-october-book-
              >
              > Sounds seriously interesting. :-( I must spend Easter reading them....
              >
              > On second thoughts, sod it. I'm off down the pub.
              >
            • bikerpenguin66
              ... Thanks. I read mostly fiction too (recently went through Jim Butcher s books), but I was looking for books pertaining to the subject here. -brian
              Message 6 of 8 , Apr 5, 2010
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                --- In DebunkCreation@yahoogroups.com, "buck12ga2000" <hannahd5302@...> wrote:

                > I'm into fiction-novels. Over the past year I've been reading all the
                > books by John Irving. John brings us a unique perspective, to say the
                > least. Interesting characters and highly entertaining. My favorite is
                > probably Cider House Rules.
                >
                > I'm also reading all the books by Jeffery Deavers.
                >
                > Buck
                >


                Thanks. I read mostly fiction too (recently went through Jim Butcher's books), but I was looking for books pertaining to the subject here.

                -brian
                ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                "I didn't create the term `creation science.' If you had called it creation magic, or creation mysticism, or creation mythology, we
                wouldn't even be having this discussion. But you people called it
                creation science. Now I have to respond. So I'm sorry if you're ofended, but I'm deeply offended by your calling what is essentially magic, science" - Joseph D. McInerney.
              • lociubic
                ... As an alternative to buying or spending your time readind The Supersense , I highly recommend a thoughtful 20 minute TV show that does a good job at
                Message 7 of 8 , Apr 7, 2010
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                  --- In DebunkCreation@yahoogroups.com, "bikerpenguin66" <bneville66@...> wrote:

                  > I've just read:
                  ...
                  > The Supersense : Why We Believe in the Unbelievable, by Bruce Hood. Talks about why people believe in psychic abilities, the paranormal and the like (briefly talks about creationism), but no real science in it. Mostly anecdotal studies. Not all that interesting.
                  >
                  > -brian

                  As an alternative to buying or spending your time readind "The Supersense", I highly recommend a thoughtful 20 minute TV show that does a good job at explaining why many intelligent people believe in stupid crap.

                  Though this episode is a parody of the psychic John Edwards' "Crossing Over" it also applies to the creationists. One really good perspective can be heard by listening to the little boy Stan (and not the gullible adults) in "my favorite episode" of South Park:

                  The Biggest Douche in the Universe
                  http://www.southparkstudios.com/episodes/103625
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