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Re: [DebunkCreation] Re: climate warming

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  • Michael Brass
    ... Us Capetonians heavily dispute this *grins*
    Message 1 of 9 , Dec 1, 2009
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      2009/12/1 Steve S <stevesommers56@...>:
      >
      >  Summertime in Washington, though, is probably the closest thing to heaven there is on earth.

      Us Capetonians heavily dispute this *grins*
    • Anne Gilbert
      Lenny: Around here, drought conditions can occur if there is a relatively rainless winter(yeah, that has happened on several occasions in recent memory, and
      Message 2 of 9 , Dec 1, 2009
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        Lenny:
         
        Around here, drought conditions can occur if there is a relatively "rainless" winter(yeah, that has happened on several occasions in recent memory, and people who operate skiing areas cry during these winters), because if there isn't a certain amount of snowpack by April 1, there won't be much in the rivers thereafter, since summer around here is an annual "drought":  we're actually drier than Arizona between July and October, approximately.  We have a climate that's basically not like any other part of the US.  In some ways.
        Anne G

         


        --- On Mon, 11/30/09, Anne Gilbert <avgilbert@clearwire .net> wrote:

        >
        People don't generally know this, but Seattle has about the same amount of rainfall as Austin, Texas. 

        I know --I was just busting on ya. :)

        I'm quite certain we get more rain here in Florida. And here, our rain tends to come in very short, very intense bursts, accompanied by an awful lot of lightning. :)

        I have noticed changes in the weather patterns, though, in the 12 or so years I've been here. It used to be that in the summer it rained at least four days a week, regularly, at about 4:30 or 5:00 pm, for about half an hour, very intensely.

        Now, the regular afternoon thunderstorms are rare. We have had drought conditions for several years now. I'm not sure how long a "drought" has to be before it qualifies as a bona fide "climate change".

        I have, however, noticed that the Cuban tree frogs and the Cane toads are lots more common now than they were when I first moved here, and they are tropical animals who like it hot, which indicates that the critters, at least, are seeing a definite marked increase in the average temperature here. It's also drier, but those species are able to tolerate that pretty well.

        Of course, long ago, Florida was part of the large desert that once stretched entirely across the southern US (which is why we have remnant populations of prickley pear cactus, burrowing owls, diamondback rattlesnakes, and burrowing tortoises here in Florida). Perhaps we are now reverting.

        ============ ========= ========= ========= =========
        Lenny Flank
        "There are no loose threads in the web of life"

        Editor, Red and Black Publishers
        http://www.RedandBl ackPublishers. com

        Red and Black T Shirts - T Shirts for social change
        http://zazzle. com/lflank*

      • Anne Gilbert
        Steve: And sometimes, in late January and on occasion in February, the skies clear, and you can actually see Mt. Rainier! It is a glorious sight indeed. Anne
        Message 3 of 9 , Dec 1, 2009
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          Steve:
           
          And sometimes, in late January and on occasion in February, the skies clear, and you can actually see Mt. Rainier!  It is a glorious sight indeed.
          Anne G

          Tell me about it! When I was in the Navy I was stationed at Bremerton. I arrived on November 1 and literally didn't see a sunny day until March. When the sun did come out, though, the view of Mount Rainier was spectacular. I remember driving on Kitsap Way and suddenly seeing this humongous mountain right in front of me that I previously had no idea was there. It was awesome. Summertime in Washington, though, is probably the closest thing to heaven there is on earth.

          >It's "wetter" because of the frequent flooding, which is caused by warm temperatures coming from Hawaii or the South Pacific, meeting with, well, moist air, and then the rain just dribbles and drips till the rivers run. And this is happening quite a bit more frequently of late, so frequently that they've had to repair dams and move houses near river banks, and the like. These conditions have even cause some water damage(from overflowing drains), and even one rather spectacular, newsworthy death in one area close to where I live.
          > Anne G
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > --- On Mon, 11/30/09, Anne Gilbert <avgilbert@. ..> wrote:
          >
          > > Well, from about the same period as Dickens(when the Pacific NW began to be seriously settled), until now, there has been massive "removal of excessive timber"), and it has been getting decidedly warmer. . . .and wetter.
          >
          > Wetter in Seattle? What, it now rains twice every day instead of just once? ;)
          >
          > Seriously, though, massive deforestation has always been a hobby for Americans. The entire US eastern seaboard used to be one massive contiguous deciduous forest, and we managed to destroy all of it. The passenger pigeon, which may well have been the most populous terrestrial species on the planet, was not driven to extinction by hunting -- it disappeared because we cut down literally its entire habitat.
          >
          > It's no wonder that so many Amazonian nations view the US as self-righteous hypocrites.
          >
          > ============ ========= ========= ========= =========
          > Lenny Flank
          > "There are no loose threads in the web of life"
          >
          > Editor, Red and Black Publishers
          > http://www.RedandBl ackPublishers. com
          >
          > Red and Black T Shirts - T Shirts for social change
          > http://zazzle. com/lflank*
          >

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