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Re: [DebunkCreation] Re: Franklin Graham

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  • Torfinn ├śrmen
    ... The genus _Haliaetus_. The ospreys (_Pandion_) is maybe only one species in he whole world. It is not closely related to any other birds of prey. ... Erh,
    Message 1 of 99 , Oct 1, 2007
      >> But I don't think they are very closely related, or are they?
      >
      >Probably. The Bald Eagle is from a genus known as the fish-eagles.
      >The Osprey isn't closely related, though, despite also being called a
      >fish-eagle (remember kids, this is why scientists hate common names).

      The genus _Haliaetus_. The ospreys (_Pandion_) is maybe only one species in
      he whole world. It is not closely related to any other birds of prey.

      >> Anyone knows? If they are not closely related, is there any
      >> particular reason why two fish-eating species would both evolve
      >> very much the same colouration, or is it just a coincidence?
      >
      >I've heard a couple of ideas thrown forward to explain the
      >white-headed-fish-eater types, but none of them sound convincing to
      >me. One idea is that it "breaks up the bird-shape when seen from
      >below". I don't buy this because I've seen them from below and it
      >doesn't work. Another is that the white feathers allow the head to
      >dry more easily, and the head is the only part that gets in the water.

      Erh, wouldn't _black_ feathers allow them to dry more quicly, being more
      heat-absorbent? And anyhow, both fish-eagles and ospreys mainly fish with
      their feet which are featherless. I don't think _any_ birds of prey use
      their beaks to capture their prey, they all use their feet. The beak is not
      strong enough.

      >A lot of water birds are white, though, without being prone to
      >getting wet (it's the most common color for egrets, locally, just as
      >one example), but anhinga and cormorants are black and get far, far
      >more wet. Anhinga are famous for their needing to dry, and if white
      >was all that useful a color, you wouldn't think they'd be black.

      Yes, many above-suface stalkers like egrets, herons and cranes are pale
      coloured, while underwater swimmers like anhingas, cormorants, auks and
      dippers are dark.


      Cheers
      Torfinn
    • Michael E. Suttkus, II
      ... I never knew raccoons had musk glands. Learn something new everyday.
      Message 99 of 99 , Oct 20, 2007
        --- In DebunkCreation@yahoogroups.com, RAY PERREAULT <daganawidah@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > \You have to know how to clean them. There are fuor musk glands
        > which must be removed or else the flavor is terrible. And don't
        > squeeze or rupture them, either.

        I never knew raccoons had musk glands. Learn something new everyday.
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