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What do the words mean?

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  • Mike Zeno
    A friend just gave me Drum Hat Buddha, my first exposure to Dave Carter and Tracy Grammer. I love the CD and am trying to make sense of the words of some of
    Message 1 of 9 , Feb 1, 2004
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      A friend just gave me Drum Hat Buddha, my first exposure to Dave Carter and Tracy Grammer. I love the CD and am trying to make sense of the words of some of the songs. For starters, can anyone give me any idea how to make sense of "The Power and Glory"?


      Zeno, Drake and Hively
      4020 Lake Washington Blvd NE, Suite 100
      Kirkland WA 98033
      Phone 425-822-1511
      Fax 425-822-1411

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • D. Keith Howington
      ... It is, I understand, more or less autobiographical, and relates the tale of Dave Carter s attempt to break into the Nashville songwriting scene. Listen to
      Message 2 of 9 , Feb 1, 2004
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        Mike Zeno wrote:

        > A friend just gave me Drum Hat Buddha, my first exposure to Dave
        > Carter and Tracy Grammer. I love the CD and am trying to make sense
        > of the words of some of the songs. For starters, can anyone give me
        > any idea how to make sense of "The Power and Glory"?


        It is, I understand, more or less autobiographical, and relates the tale
        of Dave Carter's attempt to break into the Nashville songwriting scene.
        Listen to the words again, and feel his frustration at not being able to
        get anyone's attention. And of his meeting with one of the powerful
        female figures of country music, and lack of success even there.

        As he said, that business "... ain't all that they tell you."

        ===|================/ D. Keith Howington, CEO (CEO@...)
      • leknifrag
        ... For starters, can anyone give me any idea how to make sense of The Power and Glory ? The Power and Glory, like all DC songs, has many levels. I can
        Message 3 of 9 , Feb 1, 2004
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          --- In Dave-and-Tracy@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Zeno" <mzeno@z...> wrote:
          For starters, can anyone give me any idea how to make sense of "The
          Power and Glory"?


          "The Power and Glory," like all DC songs, has many levels. I can
          tell you that the verse about the "aphrodite nightengale" relates to
          an evening in Portland when Emmylou Harris (with Buddy Miller) played
          the Roseland Theatre. Tanglewood Tree was happening and I, being the
          zealous fan I was/am, was forcing it on everyone I could. I invited
          Dave to the show as my guest; took him backstage afetr the show, and
          pressed copies of TT into both Emmylou and Buddy's hands and
          introduced them. Dave, ever gracious (and somewhat shy and nervous)
          shook hands and went his way. Emmylou was gracious (I have never
          experienced her otherwise) but also tired; I'm sure Dave picked up on
          this and his discomfort increased.

          The road wears on you; it's alos how you make your living if you are
          a performer. Although Dave and I never discussed this encounter, I
          was *shocked* to find out that he had put it down for history on
          DHB. In fact, I never knew that's what the verse was about until
          after Dave had passed. Honestly, I still don't know how I feel about
          the whole thing; making my friend uncomfortable sure wasn't part of
          my intent!

          Weird tangetial note- Dave and Tracy shared a bill with Buddy and
          Julie Miller in late 2001; less than 24 hours after Dave had tied,
          Buddy called me to share his condolences.

          It's still a fantasy of mine to hear Buddy, Julie and Emmy sing one
          of Dave's songs. Or even to hear Buddy and his band blast "30 Bad
          Summers" (Terry W and I came up with *that* gem of an idea).

          Back to the song; I think Dave was really discouraged by his foray
          into Nashville and probably didn't very much like the production-line
          song machine that music row *can* be. And, although he was charming
          and engaging, Dave struck me as a very solitary, private person; I
          don't think he really would have enjoyed the glad-handing and general
          schmoozing required to be "successful" in Nashville. I believe
          that "The Power and Glory" is a fairly unblinking look on what it's
          like to try to make your living in "Music City." Hope that helps.

          Dave frequently told many of us that he one day wanted to "stay at
          home and write songs and have Tracy go out and sing them." It's
          interesting for me, now, to hear Tracy out on the road (I've seen her
          at several non Portland shows last year) singing songs like "The
          Power and Glory."

          I'm curious where 2004 will take her. Personally, I really liked
          seeing her with drums and bass behind her. I'd love it if she'd strap
          on an electric guitar (a direction Dave and I had talked about in
          Spring of '02) and really ROCK some of the Dave and Tracy catalog.
          I would love to hear some hot pickin' on tunes like "Shadows of
          Evangeline" and "Love, the Magician..."
        • Rongrittz@aol.com
          ... into Nashville and probably didn t very much like the production-line song machine that music row *can* be.
          Message 4 of 9 , Feb 1, 2004
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            >> Back to the song; I think Dave was really discouraged by his foray
            into Nashville and probably didn't very much like the production-line
            song machine that music row *can* be. <<

            Also, Tracy has said that the Nashville cats told him "We like your
            songs, Dave, but they have entirely too many words." And I once
            heard Dave tell that the plan -- one of these days that never came --
            was for him and Tracy to go to Nashville and actually try to record a
            straight-ahead country album. The unrecorded song "Green-Eyed Girl"
            (which I heard the duo perform the week before Dave died) was one
            that he mentioned might go on such an album.

            The bridge of the song might also be a commentary on his Nashville
            episode:

            "Now everyone wants to be rich and young
            Graceful and famous and free
            And everyone wants to impress someone
            But it don't mean nothin to me"

            RG
          • leknifrag
            ... - ... a ... RG, was that going be before or after the psychedelic album and the truck driving album produced by Pete Anderson (of Dwight Yoakum fame)? (not
            Message 5 of 9 , Feb 1, 2004
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              --- In Dave-and-Tracy@yahoogroups.com, Rongrittz@a... wrote:
              > And I once
              > heard Dave tell that the plan -- one of these days that never came -
              -
              > was for him and Tracy to go to Nashville and actually try to record
              a
              > straight-ahead country album.


              RG, was that going be before or after the psychedelic album and the
              truck driving album produced by Pete Anderson (of Dwight Yoakum fame)?

              (not joking here folks, those were two thing Dave said he was
              planning to do...)
            • Terry Woodburn
              Re: The Power and Glory ... I remember sitting at that Emmylou show with friends. A few weeks before the show, I had belatedly heard that Dave was teaching
              Message 6 of 9 , Feb 2, 2004
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                Re: The Power and Glory

                > Dave to the show as my guest; took him backstage afetr the show, and
                > pressed copies of TT into both Emmylou and Buddy's hands and
                > introduced them.

                I remember sitting at that Emmylou show with friends. A few weeks before
                the show, I had belatedly heard
                that Dave was teaching songwriting classes in Portland. I called and the
                class had already filled. Damn. Shortly before Buddy and Julie opened
                the Emmylou show, I look over and there stands big, tall Dave Carter next
                to me. I say hi & blather that I am a huge fan and missed out on his
                class. He smiles and says, "why don't you just show up and I will tell
                them you are my friend." So I did. And yeah, I paid the tuition, a mere
                pittance in comparison to what I got out of the class.

                Quick diversion and grovel. Does anyone on the list have recordings of
                some of those songwriting classes? Please contact me off-list if you
                do. I would be deeply appreciative. Dave said that at most of the large
                festivals, a songwriting workshop was less a workshop, but more of a
                relaxed performance with a little time to take some questions. He was a
                great teacher and was kind and constructive, whether your song was great
                or awful. I thought that many aspects of his songwriting process were
                unique, bold and somewhat mysterious. And I really think he loved
                teaching. He was a natural.

                Thanks for the post, Phil. It brought back a wonderful memory. The
                Power and Glory is one of my favorites. It is a song about
                disappointment, when no one who "matters" is interested in your music,
                yet he knew his craft could stand up with the bards and climbers. Dave
                may have never agreed, but he was too good for Nashville. Or at least
                not right for Nashville. Then Tracy came along and things started to
                happen in the folk and Americana end for Dave's music. They found their
                calling, their audience.

                > I believe
                > that "The Power and Glory" is a fairly unblinking look on what it's
                > like to try to make your living in "Music City." Hope that helps.

                All that and a rather sympathetic look to someone he so admired,
                Emmylou. "Poor proud aging queen, did her eyes betray" I think her
                world weariness met his world weariness in a way. And then for Dave to
                end the song on such a hopeful and humble note. An affirmation that
                there are other things in life besides music. Kids round you on the
                floor and a "regular" life. I think Dave just wanted to write songs and
                not have to "sell" them. Like he said, "have Tracy sing the songs and I
                will go live in a trailer somewhere and write them".

                > I'm curious where 2004 will take her. Personally, I really liked
                > seeing her with drums and bass behind her.

                I certainly have to add, I loved seeing Tracy with a band. As she looked
                around at her band at the sold-out Aladdin Theater crowd a few months
                back. she said, "Dave would be so happy."

                Onward.

                TW

                Any BC listers go to the Vancouver show? And how about you salty dogs in
                Astoria? We want reports. Chop, chop.
              • --k
                Oh what the heck....you guys edit.I have to go to sleep.and sorry my spellcheck is OOO.(Spybot really does goof up spellcheck.just like it says it does) Tracy
                Message 7 of 9 , Feb 2, 2004
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                  Oh what the heck....you guys edit.I have to go to
                  sleep.and sorry my spellcheck is OOO.(Spybot really
                  does goof up spellcheck.just like it says it does)



                  "Tracy Grammer Dou"



                  That's actually what the little chruch marquee of the
                  Clatsop Community College Center for the Performing
                  Arts said...and I can only think it some mangled
                  homage to Dave's Buddhist leanings......It sure would
                  have given him a giggle, anyway.



                  So....after reading all the list buzz from the east
                  coast, I was delighted to have the opportunity to see
                  Tracy play with Jim Henry and his famous Dobro, and
                  from the amount of applause, I'd say the audience was
                  pretty delighted, too.



                  And it's always extra special to meet up with fellow
                  D&T fans...in this case the always Fab and FUN Mollie
                  & Rick (who made my camping trip to the Sisters Folk
                  Fest a blast last summer), and we finally got to meet
                  musicians and listers Mike & Julie Samudio!...This
                  was after the show while Tracy talked to fans, as she
                  always so good and graciously does, even in *this*
                  case -- after an eight-hour drive (and a gnarly
                  detour) all the way down from B.C.



                  THANK YOU, TRACY!!! Your openness, your candid
                  replies and your welcoming smile is always so very
                  much appreciated.



                  Set List:



                  Gunmetal Eyes

                  Ordinary Town

                  Crocodile Man

                  Gentle Arms of Eden

                  I Go Like A Raven

                  Hard To Make It

                  Love, The Magician



                  Here Tracy told a neat little background story about
                  the naming of "Drum Hat Buddha"...and also shared a
                  few of her thoughts on what to name the coming
                  CD.................This was in intro to:



                  Shadows of Evangeline



                  ...which may turn out to be the name of the new CD
                  except for the fact, says Tracy (and it always just
                  tickles me when she says this), that the song is
                  soooooo "creeeeeepy"....



                  And next came a brand new experience for
                  me....hearing Tracy do



                  St. Delores



                  ...sweet and soft...but strangely powerful. I was
                  really glad to be up close for this... to be able, at
                  first, to pick up the subtle things you can see close
                  up...but then...well each time I've seen Tracy in
                  this last year, I've marveled at how she gets better
                  and better ...but here, last night on this
                  song...something different in her enunciation,
                  something that somehow transcended any further
                  thinking about enunciation, articulation, technical
                  mastery and such... Maybe Tracy was channeling...or
                  she suddenly shifted into "the zone" or whatever you
                  want to call it.....the words just sort of emmanated
                  then ..like a prayer....

                  ....but i'm getting weird ..one of those medieval
                  Annunciation/Holy Ghost portraits just popped into my
                  head ...so i'd better give the devil his due here and
                  get back to technical things like
                  "TIMING"....because....it was, i realize now, the
                  perfect set up, too... ...."Delores" left me
                  completely suspended.....and vulnerable....... so
                  that when Jim Henry then did one of his songs at this
                  point, i took a punch in the solar-plexes at the
                  footy-jammies lyric in his



                  "Drive-In-Movie Picture Show"



                  ... and by the end of the song, I was a total puddle
                  of mascara-running nostalgia.

                  ( ...sneaky, you two.....sneaky sneaky sneaky!!!!!)



                  Hey Ho

                  The Mountain

                  Winter When He Goes

                  ...last few times it's been the reversible
                  "pronouns" intro for this one, but I still have a
                  clear image of that "cold trailer" etched in my mind,
                  from the intro the first time I heard Tracy sing this
                  one at McCabe's....Tracy's really good at painting
                  indelible pictures... and has been right from the
                  start. And I mention this because of all the "Book"
                  buzz on the list...so, for my two cents, the
                  children's book is a great idea...and a regular type
                  of bio would be nice, too, but the book I'd *really*
                  want to read is Tracy's.....well, you know.....with
                  dragonflies, and cheezy-chips, and little buddha
                  statues, and a train whistles, and the silly things
                  like "shamanic" rhyming with "demonic," and like how
                  Dave loved dogs, and all those little things that
                  make you really 'feel' a story... Tracy's own "true"
                  story......but then, maybe it's just too soon. ...but
                  maybe something to think about, tho, down the road
                  apiece.



                  Tracy then dedicated the next one to her
                  soon-to-be-retired violin..



                  When I Go





                  And another real treat!..an instrumental medley
                  opening with a Tracy original melded into this little
                  piece composed of practice scales she always liked
                  melded into "St. Ann's Reel"..



                  Tracy played her new Mandola. I think that was on
                  "Wasn't Born To Follow" ---that Byrds' song from
                  *Easy Rider*. actually it's written by Goffin &
                  King..who knew?.but I hope next time she does "Born
                  To Be Wild".for personal reasons..hee-hee..well.it
                  could work.as a ballad.come on, don't be so
                  narrow-minded, you guys.bwaaaaaaah!



                  Encore:



                  Jim Henry..Last Call -That's It For The Night

                  Happytown





                  And for RG's sake, I turn the rest of the review
                  over to Mike & Julie & Mollie & Rick for their
                  musicians' take on the whole event.



                  --k






                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Rongrittz@aol.com
                  ... driving album produced by Pete Anderson (of Dwight Yoakum fame)?
                  Message 8 of 9 , Feb 2, 2004
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                    >> RG, was that going be before or after the psychedelic album and the truck
                    driving album produced by Pete Anderson (of Dwight Yoakum fame)? <<

                    Not to mention the planned follow-up to Drum Hat Buddha ("The Moon and
                    Seven") and the re-recorded Snake Handlin' Man ("Seven is the Number"). Damn, they
                    were gonna be busy . . .

                    RG
                  • leknifrag
                    ... Wasn t Born To Follow?!?!?!?! It was written by Carole King and Gerry Goffin; was instrumental in Crosby leaving the Byrds and is part of a *great* scene
                    Message 9 of 9 , Feb 2, 2004
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                      --- In Dave-and-Tracy@yahoogroups.com, "--k" <tuleebird@e...> wrote:
                      >

                      > Tracy played her new Mandola. I think that was on
                      > "Wasn't Born To Follow" ---that Byrds' song from
                      > *Easy Rider*. actually it's written by Goffin &
                      > King..who knew?.but I hope next time she does "Born
                      > To Be Wild".for personal reasons..hee-hee..well.it
                      > could work.as a ballad.come on, don't be so
                      > narrow-minded, you guys.bwaaaaaaah!


                      Wasn't Born To Follow?!?!?!?!

                      It was written by Carole King and Gerry Goffin; was instrumental in
                      Crosby leaving the Byrds and is part of a *great* scene in Easy
                      Rider.

                      I am no soooo bummed I didn't go. I was too beat from my week to
                      make the drive. Damn. ANybody tape?
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