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Re: [DVDongle] Queston about letters after person's callsign

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  • Matt Maguire
    To be honest, I have never had a successful two-way QSO using callsign routing (either the remote operator is not there, or did not know how to program their
    Message 1 of 12 , Sep 10, 2011
      To be honest, I have never had a successful two-way QSO using callsign routing (either the remote operator is not there, or did not know how to program their radio to get back to me. Or maybe they just didn't want to talk to me... :-) ).

      There are some significant limitations of callsign routing:

      - both parties need to be accessing a repeater via RF ports. Callsign routing won't work with dongles, DVAPs and hotspots.

      - you can't listen to what is happening on the remote repeater before you transmit. You just have to transmit and hope that there was not already a QSO in progress. You have no way of knowing if you clashed with someone until after you unkey your mike. I'm the sort of operator who likes to listen much more than talk, so for me this limitation is quite onerous. I am so thankful to Robin, not only for developing my DVDongle and DVAP, but for developing D-Plus linking as well, which does allow you to monitor exactly what is happening on a remote repeater or reflector. 

      - the operator at the other end needs to know how to program their radio to get back to you. Many operators don't seem very comfortable with configuring the DSTAR settings on their radios. Many will just let a knowledgeable member of the club program up their radio, and they'll just sit on their local repeater, which may be permanently linked to a reflector by the repeater admin. All they need to do is select the repeater channel on their radio and key their mike.

      - When you move from one repeater to another, the updates take a long time (typically hours, I understand) to propagate throughout the network. There are enhancements, such as ircddb, which can make the updates almost instantaneous, but then both parties must be accessing repeaters on the ircddb network (unfortunately in Australia, most of the repeaters do not participate).

      - using callsign routing, only two repeaters can be involved. If you want to have a three-way conversation where the parties are on three separate repeaters, then you are out of luck with standard callsign routing. There is an interesting extension called "STARnet" which allows you to "callsign route" to a "talkgroup", and anyone registered with that talkgroup will receive your transmission (again, in Australia, I think there is only one repeater in the country participating in this).

      So, there are solutions to the limitations of callsign routing, but apart from D-Plus linking, they have not been universally adopted. In Japan itself, where the D-STAR standards were developed, they don't use D-Plus linking at all. Maybe there callsign routing is more prevalent, but I wouldn't know (and I can't listen to what is happening on the repeaters in Japan, because callsign routing doesn't support it, and they don't run D-Plus).

      So, there you have it. Maybe others on the list use callsign routing more regularly with more success, but my guess is that they are almost certainly the minority.

      73,
      Matt VK2ACL 

      On 10/09/2011, at 2:06 PM, Edmonton Fire Radio wrote:

       

      Thanks, Robin and Matt. I appreciate the replies.

       

      Matt, that’s an interesting application. I can see in your case how it really makes sense. Out of curiosity, is call sign routing used much? Or is that a feature of DSTAR that is only used by the minority?

       

      Jeff VE6EFR


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