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Re: [DESG] een vraag over "ee"

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  • Godwin Stewart
    On Fri, 01 Aug 2008 05:33:11 -0000, Cathleen Twardzik ... ITYM a long a in *Dutch* for the first examples. The reason they sound different is simply
    Message 1 of 7 , Aug 1 1:23 AM
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      On Fri, 01 Aug 2008 05:33:11 -0000, "Cathleen Twardzik"
      <firefly315@...> wrote:

      > How come the "ee" in words, such as, "heel" and "veel" sounds like
      > a "long a" in English, while the " ee" in "keer" sounds like a "long
      > e" in English?

      ITYM a long "a" in *Dutch* for the first examples.

      The reason they sound different is simply because they're different
      languages. You cannot apply the rules of pronunciation from one language to
      words in another language. It's as simple as that.

      --
      G. Stewart - grs.ygroups@...

      Why do people pay to go up tall buildings and then put money in binoculars
      to look down at things on the ground?
    • Cathleen Twardzik
      Hoi Godwin, Thanks for your insight. I guess I should clarify my question better. :) I recently noticed that there are two different pronunciations for the
      Message 2 of 7 , Aug 1 3:54 PM
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        Hoi Godwin,

        Thanks for your insight. I guess I should clarify my question
        better. :)

        I recently noticed that there are two different pronunciations for
        the "ee" sound in Dutch? Why is the "ee" sound pronounced in two
        different ways? Is there a trick that I could use to be able to tell
        which sound I need to use when I say a word with the "ee" sound in it?

        P.S. The way I discribed the diference between the two different
        pronunciations in Dutch was how they sound to me as a native English
        speaker.

        Groetjes,

        Cathleen


        --- In DUTCH-ENGLISH-STUDY-GROUP@yahoogroups.com, Godwin Stewart
        <grs.ygroups@...> wrote:
        >
        > On Fri, 01 Aug 2008 05:33:11 -0000, "Cathleen Twardzik"
        > <firefly315@...> wrote:
        >
        > > How come the "ee" in words, such as, "heel" and "veel" sounds
        like
        > > a "long a" in English, while the " ee" in "keer" sounds like
        a "long
        > > e" in English?
        >
        > ITYM a long "a" in *Dutch* for the first examples.
        >
        > The reason they sound different is simply because they're different
        > languages. You cannot apply the rules of pronunciation from one
        language to
        > words in another language. It's as simple as that.
        >
        > --
        > G. Stewart - grs.ygroups@...
        >
        > Why do people pay to go up tall buildings and then put money in
        binoculars
        > to look down at things on the ground?
        >
      • crofttk
        An interesting question. I just sat here and discussed this with my wife, who is Flemish from West Vlaanderen in Belgie (I am American). As a SOUTHERN Dutch
        Message 3 of 7 , Aug 1 4:27 PM
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          An interesting question.

          I just sat here and discussed this with my wife, who is Flemish from
          West Vlaanderen in Belgie (I am American). As a SOUTHERN Dutch
          speaker, her pronunciation of all three words is identical and, to my
          ear, just half way in between the long "a" of English (e.g., "make")
          and the "ee" of English (e.g., "seed"). She says there is no
          difference among the three words as far as their vowel sounds,
          although to my ear it's hard to say the "ee" in front of the "r"
          sounds exactly the same as the "ee" in front of "l".

          Do any fluent speakers of NORTHERN Dutch (i.e., Nederlanders) out
          there have an insight into how their pronunciation of these words
          differs from the Southern pronunciation?

          Of course, I realize, some native speakers of Dutch may not agree
          with the North/South distinction I make in general but it is my way
          of trying to distinguish between Dutch as spoken in the Netherlands
          versus Belgium and not confuse that with Flemish dialects. Of
          course, my observations only cover West Flanders, not the other parts
          of Belgium, whose accents may vary in this circumstance from that of
          my wife's.

          Groetjes, Kenn

          --- In DUTCH-ENGLISH-STUDY-GROUP@yahoogroups.com, "Cathleen Twardzik"
          <firefly315@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hoi Godwin,
          >
          > Thanks for your insight. I guess I should clarify my question
          > better. :)
          >
          > I recently noticed that there are two different pronunciations for
          > the "ee" sound in Dutch? Why is the "ee" sound pronounced in two
          > different ways? Is there a trick that I could use to be able to
          tell
          > which sound I need to use when I say a word with the "ee" sound in
          it?
          >
          > P.S. The way I discribed the diference between the two different
          > pronunciations in Dutch was how they sound to me as a native English
          > speaker.
          >
          > Groetjes,
          >
          > Cathleen
          >
          >
          > --- In DUTCH-ENGLISH-STUDY-GROUP@yahoogroups.com, Godwin Stewart
          > <grs.ygroups@> wrote:
          > >
          > > On Fri, 01 Aug 2008 05:33:11 -0000, "Cathleen Twardzik"
          > > <firefly315@> wrote:
          > >
          > > > How come the "ee" in words, such as, "heel" and "veel" sounds
          > like
          > > > a "long a" in English, while the " ee" in "keer" sounds like
          > a "long
          > > > e" in English?
          > >
          > > ITYM a long "a" in *Dutch* for the first examples.
          > >
          > > The reason they sound different is simply because they're
          different
          > > languages. You cannot apply the rules of pronunciation from one
          > language to
          > > words in another language. It's as simple as that.
          > >
          > > --
          > > G. Stewart - grs.ygroups@
          > >
          > > Why do people pay to go up tall buildings and then put money in
          > binoculars
          > > to look down at things on the ground?
          > >
          >
        • Cathleen Twardzik
          Hoi Kenn, Dank je wel voor jouw leuk explanatie. Het was erg goed. Ik begrip het nu. Groetjes, Cathleen ... from ... my ... (e.g., make ) ... parts ... of
          Message 4 of 7 , Sep 4, 2008
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            Hoi Kenn,

            Dank je wel voor jouw leuk explanatie. Het was erg goed. Ik begrip
            het nu.

            Groetjes,

            Cathleen


            --- In DUTCH-ENGLISH-STUDY-GROUP@yahoogroups.com, "crofttk"
            <crofttk@...> wrote:
            >
            > An interesting question.
            >
            > I just sat here and discussed this with my wife, who is Flemish
            from
            > West Vlaanderen in Belgie (I am American). As a SOUTHERN Dutch
            > speaker, her pronunciation of all three words is identical and, to
            my
            > ear, just half way in between the long "a" of English
            (e.g., "make")
            > and the "ee" of English (e.g., "seed"). She says there is no
            > difference among the three words as far as their vowel sounds,
            > although to my ear it's hard to say the "ee" in front of the "r"
            > sounds exactly the same as the "ee" in front of "l".
            >
            > Do any fluent speakers of NORTHERN Dutch (i.e., Nederlanders) out
            > there have an insight into how their pronunciation of these words
            > differs from the Southern pronunciation?
            >
            > Of course, I realize, some native speakers of Dutch may not agree
            > with the North/South distinction I make in general but it is my way
            > of trying to distinguish between Dutch as spoken in the Netherlands
            > versus Belgium and not confuse that with Flemish dialects. Of
            > course, my observations only cover West Flanders, not the other
            parts
            > of Belgium, whose accents may vary in this circumstance from that
            of
            > my wife's.
            >
            > Groetjes, Kenn
            >
            > --- In DUTCH-ENGLISH-STUDY-GROUP@yahoogroups.com, "Cathleen
            Twardzik"
            > <firefly315@> wrote:
            > >
            > > Hoi Godwin,
            > >
            > > Thanks for your insight. I guess I should clarify my question
            > > better. :)
            > >
            > > I recently noticed that there are two different pronunciations for
            > > the "ee" sound in Dutch? Why is the "ee" sound pronounced in two
            > > different ways? Is there a trick that I could use to be able to
            > tell
            > > which sound I need to use when I say a word with the "ee" sound
            in
            > it?
            > >
            > > P.S. The way I discribed the diference between the two different
            > > pronunciations in Dutch was how they sound to me as a native
            English
            > > speaker.
            > >
            > > Groetjes,
            > >
            > > Cathleen
            > >
            > >
            > > --- In DUTCH-ENGLISH-STUDY-GROUP@yahoogroups.com, Godwin Stewart
            > > <grs.ygroups@> wrote:
            > > >
            > > > On Fri, 01 Aug 2008 05:33:11 -0000, "Cathleen Twardzik"
            > > > <firefly315@> wrote:
            > > >
            > > > > How come the "ee" in words, such as, "heel" and "veel" sounds
            > > like
            > > > > a "long a" in English, while the " ee" in "keer" sounds like
            > > a "long
            > > > > e" in English?
            > > >
            > > > ITYM a long "a" in *Dutch* for the first examples.
            > > >
            > > > The reason they sound different is simply because they're
            > different
            > > > languages. You cannot apply the rules of pronunciation from one
            > > language to
            > > > words in another language. It's as simple as that.
            > > >
            > > > --
            > > > G. Stewart - grs.ygroups@
            > > >
            > > > Why do people pay to go up tall buildings and then put money in
            > > binoculars
            > > > to look down at things on the ground?
            > > >
            > >
            >
          • crofttk
            Ah, goed! Graag gedaan, Cathleen! Groetjes, Kenn ... begrip ... to ... way ... Netherlands ... for ... to ... Stewart ... sounds ... like ... one ... in
            Message 5 of 7 , Sep 5, 2008
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              Ah, goed! Graag gedaan, Cathleen!

              Groetjes,
              Kenn

              --- In DUTCH-ENGLISH-STUDY-GROUP@yahoogroups.com, "Cathleen Twardzik"
              <firefly315@...> wrote:
              >
              > Hoi Kenn,
              >
              > Dank je wel voor jouw leuk explanatie. Het was erg goed. Ik
              begrip
              > het nu.
              >
              > Groetjes,
              >
              > Cathleen
              >
              >
              > --- In DUTCH-ENGLISH-STUDY-GROUP@yahoogroups.com, "crofttk"
              > <crofttk@> wrote:
              > >
              > > An interesting question.
              > >
              > > I just sat here and discussed this with my wife, who is Flemish
              > from
              > > West Vlaanderen in Belgie (I am American). As a SOUTHERN Dutch
              > > speaker, her pronunciation of all three words is identical and,
              to
              > my
              > > ear, just half way in between the long "a" of English
              > (e.g., "make")
              > > and the "ee" of English (e.g., "seed"). She says there is no
              > > difference among the three words as far as their vowel sounds,
              > > although to my ear it's hard to say the "ee" in front of the "r"
              > > sounds exactly the same as the "ee" in front of "l".
              > >
              > > Do any fluent speakers of NORTHERN Dutch (i.e., Nederlanders) out
              > > there have an insight into how their pronunciation of these words
              > > differs from the Southern pronunciation?
              > >
              > > Of course, I realize, some native speakers of Dutch may not agree
              > > with the North/South distinction I make in general but it is my
              way
              > > of trying to distinguish between Dutch as spoken in the
              Netherlands
              > > versus Belgium and not confuse that with Flemish dialects. Of
              > > course, my observations only cover West Flanders, not the other
              > parts
              > > of Belgium, whose accents may vary in this circumstance from that
              > of
              > > my wife's.
              > >
              > > Groetjes, Kenn
              > >
              > > --- In DUTCH-ENGLISH-STUDY-GROUP@yahoogroups.com, "Cathleen
              > Twardzik"
              > > <firefly315@> wrote:
              > > >
              > > > Hoi Godwin,
              > > >
              > > > Thanks for your insight. I guess I should clarify my question
              > > > better. :)
              > > >
              > > > I recently noticed that there are two different pronunciations
              for
              > > > the "ee" sound in Dutch? Why is the "ee" sound pronounced in two
              > > > different ways? Is there a trick that I could use to be able
              to
              > > tell
              > > > which sound I need to use when I say a word with the "ee" sound
              > in
              > > it?
              > > >
              > > > P.S. The way I discribed the diference between the two different
              > > > pronunciations in Dutch was how they sound to me as a native
              > English
              > > > speaker.
              > > >
              > > > Groetjes,
              > > >
              > > > Cathleen
              > > >
              > > >
              > > > --- In DUTCH-ENGLISH-STUDY-GROUP@yahoogroups.com, Godwin
              Stewart
              > > > <grs.ygroups@> wrote:
              > > > >
              > > > > On Fri, 01 Aug 2008 05:33:11 -0000, "Cathleen Twardzik"
              > > > > <firefly315@> wrote:
              > > > >
              > > > > > How come the "ee" in words, such as, "heel" and "veel"
              sounds
              > > > like
              > > > > > a "long a" in English, while the " ee" in "keer" sounds
              like
              > > > a "long
              > > > > > e" in English?
              > > > >
              > > > > ITYM a long "a" in *Dutch* for the first examples.
              > > > >
              > > > > The reason they sound different is simply because they're
              > > different
              > > > > languages. You cannot apply the rules of pronunciation from
              one
              > > > language to
              > > > > words in another language. It's as simple as that.
              > > > >
              > > > > --
              > > > > G. Stewart - grs.ygroups@
              > > > >
              > > > > Why do people pay to go up tall buildings and then put money
              in
              > > > binoculars
              > > > > to look down at things on the ground?
              > > > >
              > > >
              > >
              >
            • maveronica1005
              heel veel and keer are pronounced the same . it is long e... you just might think it is different cos of the consonant that precedes it.But it is the same
              Message 6 of 7 , Sep 5, 2008
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                heel veel and keer are pronounced the same . it is long e... you just might think it is different cos of the consonant that precedes it.But it is the same sound.

                --- On Fri, 9/5/08, crofttk <crofttk@...> wrote:
                From: crofttk <crofttk@...>
                Subject: [DESG] Re: een vraag over "ee"
                To: DUTCH-ENGLISH-STUDY-GROUP@yahoogroups.com
                Date: Friday, September 5, 2008, 6:45 PM











                Ah, goed! Graag gedaan, Cathleen!



                Groetjes,

                Kenn



                --- In DUTCH-ENGLISH- STUDY-GROUP@ yahoogroups. com, "Cathleen Twardzik"

                <firefly315@ ...> wrote:

                >

                > Hoi Kenn,

                >

                > Dank je wel voor jouw leuk explanatie. Het was erg goed. Ik

                begrip

                > het nu.

                >

                > Groetjes,

                >

                > Cathleen

                >

                >

                > --- In DUTCH-ENGLISH- STUDY-GROUP@ yahoogroups. com, "crofttk"

                > <crofttk@> wrote:

                > >

                > > An interesting question.

                > >

                > > I just sat here and discussed this with my wife, who is Flemish

                > from

                > > West Vlaanderen in Belgie (I am American). As a SOUTHERN Dutch

                > > speaker, her pronunciation of all three words is identical and,

                to

                > my

                > > ear, just half way in between the long "a" of English

                > (e.g., "make")

                > > and the "ee" of English (e.g., "seed"). She says there is no

                > > difference among the three words as far as their vowel sounds,

                > > although to my ear it's hard to say the "ee" in front of the "r"

                > > sounds exactly the same as the "ee" in front of "l".

                > >

                > > Do any fluent speakers of NORTHERN Dutch (i.e., Nederlanders) out

                > > there have an insight into how their pronunciation of these words

                > > differs from the Southern pronunciation?

                > >

                > > Of course, I realize, some native speakers of Dutch may not agree

                > > with the North/South distinction I make in general but it is my

                way

                > > of trying to distinguish between Dutch as spoken in the

                Netherlands

                > > versus Belgium and not confuse that with Flemish dialects. Of

                > > course, my observations only cover West Flanders, not the other

                > parts

                > > of Belgium, whose accents may vary in this circumstance from that

                > of

                > > my wife's.

                > >

                > > Groetjes, Kenn

                > >

                > > --- In DUTCH-ENGLISH- STUDY-GROUP@ yahoogroups. com, "Cathleen

                > Twardzik"

                > > <firefly315@ > wrote:

                > > >

                > > > Hoi Godwin,

                > > >

                > > > Thanks for your insight. I guess I should clarify my question

                > > > better. :)

                > > >

                > > > I recently noticed that there are two different pronunciations

                for

                > > > the "ee" sound in Dutch? Why is the "ee" sound pronounced in two

                > > > different ways? Is there a trick that I could use to be able

                to

                > > tell

                > > > which sound I need to use when I say a word with the "ee" sound

                > in

                > > it?

                > > >

                > > > P.S. The way I discribed the diference between the two different

                > > > pronunciations in Dutch was how they sound to me as a native

                > English

                > > > speaker.

                > > >

                > > > Groetjes,

                > > >

                > > > Cathleen

                > > >

                > > >

                > > > --- In DUTCH-ENGLISH- STUDY-GROUP@ yahoogroups. com, Godwin

                Stewart

                > > > <grs.ygroups@ > wrote:

                > > > >

                > > > > On Fri, 01 Aug 2008 05:33:11 -0000, "Cathleen Twardzik"

                > > > > <firefly315@ > wrote:

                > > > >

                > > > > > How come the "ee" in words, such as, "heel" and "veel"

                sounds

                > > > like

                > > > > > a "long a" in English, while the " ee" in "keer" sounds

                like

                > > > a "long

                > > > > > e" in English?

                > > > >

                > > > > ITYM a long "a" in *Dutch* for the first examples.

                > > > >

                > > > > The reason they sound different is simply because they're

                > > different

                > > > > languages. You cannot apply the rules of pronunciation from

                one

                > > > language to

                > > > > words in another language. It's as simple as that.

                > > > >

                > > > > --

                > > > > G. Stewart - grs.ygroups@

                > > > >

                > > > > Why do people pay to go up tall buildings and then put money

                in

                > > > binoculars

                > > > > to look down at things on the ground?

                > > > >

                > > >

                > >

                >





























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