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Proof-reading of thesis in English

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  • gina14it
    Hello everyone, I will be soon searching for a native English speaker to correct my English. Some academic background and reasonable rates will be appreciated
    Message 1 of 24 , Jun 1, 2007
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      Hello everyone,

      I will be soon searching for a native English speaker to correct my
      English. Some academic background and reasonable rates
      will be appreciated :) I am a master student in Amsterdam and write my
      final thesis in English. My both tutors are Dutch and sometimes we
      have discussions concerning my English.

      I come from Ukraine and live in Netherlands for some 4 years now.

      Thanks in advance!

      Katja
    • Luna
      Katja, I would be glad to help you in English! I am American, and am also a writer and free-lance editor. Just let me know when you need some help and I will
      Message 2 of 24 , Jun 1, 2007
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        Katja,

        I would be glad to help you in English! I am American,
        and am also a writer and free-lance editor. Just let
        me know when you need some help and I will gladly
        offer my assistance! :)

        Vriendelijke dag! (I hope that made sense *lol* I am
        trying out as many Dutch words as I can! :))
        ~Luna





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      • KEN
        I can help. I am not native though. And no charges cheers ... From: gina14it To: DUTCH-ENGLISH-STUDY-GROUP@yahoogroups.com Sent: Friday, 1
        Message 3 of 24 , Jun 3, 2007
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          I can help. I am not native though. And no charges
          cheers


          ----- Original Message ----
          From: gina14it <ginita@...>
          To: DUTCH-ENGLISH-STUDY-GROUP@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Friday, 1 June, 2007 3:51:41 PM
          Subject: [DESG] Proof-reading of thesis in English

          Hello everyone,

          I will be soon searching for a native English speaker to correct my
          English. Some academic background and reasonable rates
          will be appreciated :) I am a master student in Amsterdam and write my
          final thesis in English. My both tutors are Dutch and sometimes we
          have discussions concerning my English.

          I come from Ukraine and live in Netherlands for some 4 years now.

          Thanks in advance!

          Katja






          ___________________________________________________________
          The all-new Yahoo! Mail goes wherever you go - free your email address from your Internet provider. http://uk.docs.yahoo.com/nowyoucan.html

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • gina14it
          Hi Ken, Thanks for your kind reaction. I think I ll accept help from the first person to offer it. Might it be a good idea to share discussion points and
          Message 4 of 24 , Jun 3, 2007
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            Hi Ken,

            Thanks for your kind reaction. I think I'll accept help from the first
            person to offer it.

            Might it be a good idea to share discussion points and questions
            concerning English spelling, grammar, (academic) style, here?

            My first question would be the following:

            the difference between
            theoretic?/theoretical
            academic/academic?al?
            empiric?/empirical
            etc?
            I know the difference between economic and economical, but in case of
            the examples above there seem to be no rule....

            Any ideas or advice on which form to use?

            Thanks!

            --- In DUTCH-ENGLISH-STUDY-GROUP@yahoogroups.com, KEN <kenfore@...> wrote:
            >
            > I can help. I am not native though. And no charges
            > cheers
            >
            >
            > ----- Original Message ----
            > From: gina14it <ginita@...>
            > To: DUTCH-ENGLISH-STUDY-GROUP@yahoogroups.com
            > Sent: Friday, 1 June, 2007 3:51:41 PM
            > Subject: [DESG] Proof-reading of thesis in English
            >
            > Hello everyone,
            >
            > I will be soon searching for a native English speaker to correct my
            > English. Some academic background and reasonable rates
            > will be appreciated :) I am a master student in Amsterdam and write my
            > final thesis in English. My both tutors are Dutch and sometimes we
            > have discussions concerning my English.
            >
            > I come from Ukraine and live in Netherlands for some 4 years now.
            >
            > Thanks in advance!
            >
            > Katja
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > ___________________________________________________________
            > The all-new Yahoo! Mail goes wherever you go - free your email
            address from your Internet provider.
            http://uk.docs.yahoo.com/nowyoucan.html
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
          • Luna
            Good question! The short answer is, in the case of theoretic and academical, there is no difference. However, it is most common to say theoretical and
            Message 5 of 24 , Jun 3, 2007
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              Good question! The short answer is, in the case of
              "theoretic" and "academical," there is no difference.
              However, it is most common to say "theoretical" and
              "academic." I think that "theoretic" and "academical"
              may be archaic and would be marked as such. In the
              case of "empiric" versus "empirical," "empiric" is
              describing a person, "He's a real empiric," whereas
              "empirical" is describing an action. However, it's
              more common to hear of such a person referred to as a
              tyrant, or something similar.

              ~Luna




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            • gina14it
              Thanks for your reply! Right, so I say: theoretical research academic approach results of empirical study Anyone more examples? Funny there seems to be no
              Message 6 of 24 , Jun 4, 2007
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                Thanks for your reply!

                Right, so I say:
                theoretical research
                academic approach
                results of empirical study
                Anyone more examples?
                Funny there seems to be no rule....


                --- In DUTCH-ENGLISH-STUDY-GROUP@yahoogroups.com, Luna
                <lunagoddess82@...> wrote:
                >
                > Good question! The short answer is, in the case of
                > "theoretic" and "academical," there is no difference.
                > However, it is most common to say "theoretical" and
                > "academic." I think that "theoretic" and "academical"
                > may be archaic and would be marked as such. In the
                > case of "empiric" versus "empirical," "empiric" is
                > describing a person, "He's a real empiric," whereas
                > "empirical" is describing an action. However, it's
                > more common to hear of such a person referred to as a
                > tyrant, or something similar.
                >
                > ~Luna
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                ____________________________________________________________________________________
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              • Luna
                Hehe, as far as I know or have been able to dig up, there isn t - at least, I can t locate any rule associated with it... it just seems to be the way the
                Message 7 of 24 , Jun 5, 2007
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                  Hehe, as far as I know or have been able to dig up,
                  there isn't - at least, I can't locate any rule
                  associated with it... it just seems to be the way the
                  English language has developed over time, one of those
                  things you just have to pick up on by listening and
                  reading. Tyrannical is another example; volcanic,
                  categorical,
                  archetype/archetypal/archetypic/archetypical... *lol*
                  English can be really complicated, the best example,
                  of course, being to, two and too; there, their and
                  they're. The funny thing I find editing papers and
                  books for people is how many of them misspell "their."
                  The "ie" vs. "ei" is something a lot of people have
                  trouble with, because in the English language, both
                  spellings tend to have the same basic sound. It's
                  another example of something in our language that
                  doesn't seem to have much of a rule. The general rule
                  is "i before e except after c," but there are many
                  words, such as "receipt," for which the the rule does
                  not apply. I think it's due to the vast amount of
                  influences on the English language over the years.

                  Best of luck! :)

                  ~Luna




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                • gina14it
                  There are indeed so many words I use heuristics or intuition to choose the right form for, which often appears not actually the right one...
                  Message 8 of 24 , Jun 6, 2007
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                    There are indeed so many words I use heuristics or intuition to choose
                    the right form for, which often appears not actually the right one...
                    Analogic/analogical?
                    Rhetoric/rhetorical?
                    Semiotic/semiotical (sounds stupid)?
                    demographic/demographical?
                    Spell check does not always suggest the right option (did not check my
                    spelling 'theoretic' analysis and results of 'empiric' study). What to
                    use? Dictionary? I think native speaker with a good command of English
                    (I know quite a lot of Americans who themselves use 'there' instead
                    of their, etc.) is the best option :)
                    Perceive and receive are indeed aves rarae in English.

                    Be assured, Dutch has lots of such irregularities and illogical
                    (again: logic/logical?) phenomena.

                    And thanks for your reactions! :)

                    --- In DUTCH-ENGLISH-STUDY-GROUP@yahoogroups.com, Luna
                    <lunagoddess82@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Hehe, as far as I know or have been able to dig up,
                    > there isn't - at least, I can't locate any rule
                    > associated with it... it just seems to be the way the
                    > English language has developed over time, one of those
                    > things you just have to pick up on by listening and
                    > reading. Tyrannical is another example; volcanic,
                    > categorical,
                    > archetype/archetypal/archetypic/archetypical... *lol*
                    > English can be really complicated, the best example,
                    > of course, being to, two and too; there, their and
                    > they're. The funny thing I find editing papers and
                    > books for people is how many of them misspell "their."
                    > The "ie" vs. "ei" is something a lot of people have
                    > trouble with, because in the English language, both
                    > spellings tend to have the same basic sound. It's
                    > another example of something in our language that
                    > doesn't seem to have much of a rule. The general rule
                    > is "i before e except after c," but there are many
                    > words, such as "receipt," for which the the rule does
                    > not apply. I think it's due to the vast amount of
                    > influences on the English language over the years.
                    >
                    > Best of luck! :)
                    >
                    > ~Luna
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
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                  • Godwin Stewart
                    On Tue, 5 Jun 2007 06:08:26 -0700 (PDT), Luna ... How does the rule not apply here? The E *is* before the I in receipt, isn t it? --
                    Message 9 of 24 , Jun 6, 2007
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                      On Tue, 5 Jun 2007 06:08:26 -0700 (PDT), Luna <lunagoddess82@...>
                      wrote:

                      > The general rule is "i before e except after c," but there are many
                      > words, such as "receipt," for which the the rule does not apply.

                      How does the rule not apply here? The E *is* before the I in receipt,
                      isn't it?

                      --
                      G. Stewart - gstewart@...

                      Linux: the choice of a GNU generation
                      -- ksh @ cis . ufl . edu put this on Tshirts in '93
                    • Godwin Stewart
                      ... It becomes even more fun when you use adverbs. Adjectives that *don t* take the al at the end, such as automatic, *do* take one in the adverb:
                      Message 10 of 24 , Jun 6, 2007
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                        On Wed, 06 Jun 2007 08:31:23 -0000, "gina14it" <ginita@...> wrote:

                        > There are indeed so many words I use heuristics or intuition to choose
                        > the right form for, which often appears not actually the right one...
                        > Analogic/analogical?
                        > Rhetoric/rhetorical?
                        > Semiotic/semiotical (sounds stupid)?
                        > demographic/demographical?

                        It becomes even more fun when you use adverbs.

                        Adjectives that *don't* take the "al" at the end, such as automatic,
                        *do* take one in the adverb: automatically.

                        > (I know quite a lot of Americans who themselves use 'there' instead
                        > of their, etc.)

                        Brits as well, but that's more a kind of sloppiness than ignorance, I
                        think. The three most common mistakes I see on the 'Net are confusion
                        between "they're", "their" and "there", confusion between "your" and
                        "you're", and use of "of" instead of "have" ("must of done something"
                        instead of "must have done something"). At least in English, anyway.

                        In French, it would seem that nobody knows the difference between an
                        infinitive, a past participle, a past imperfect and a second person
                        iperative any more. With very few exceptions, it looks like France is
                        full of illiterate people.

                        > Perceive and receive are indeed aves rarae in English.

                        "I before E except after C" is what I was taught as a child.

                        So: achieve and reprieve, but perceive, conceive and receive.

                        --
                        G. Stewart - gstewart@...

                        "Mothers all want their sons to grow up to be President, but they
                        don't want them to become politicians in the process."
                        -- John F. Kennedy
                      • Luna
                        Yes, that s an easy explanation; I typed the wrong word. There s a very similar word that I was trying to think of, I got it mixed up with another word and
                        Message 11 of 24 , Jun 6, 2007
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                          Yes, that's an easy explanation; I typed the wrong
                          word. There's a very similar word that I was trying to
                          think of, I got it mixed up with another word and that
                          was what I typed. I still can't recall the exact word
                          I was intending to use, but there are other examples
                          in which the rule does not apply; in fact, "their" is
                          a prime example. There is no "c" in "their."

                          As far as illiteracy goes, I suppose that is a problem
                          everywhere; I know it's certainly a problem here in
                          America's South. Many people that I have known, for
                          instance, use "of" when they mean "have;" "should of,
                          could of, would of."




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                        • Mid
                          Note inserted by moderator: Please trim unnecessary content. ... Other examples of not following the rule are neigh, neighbor,neither, and either .
                          Message 12 of 24 , Jun 6, 2007
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                            Note inserted by moderator: Please trim unnecessary content.

                            --- In DUTCH-ENGLISH-STUDY-GROUP@yahoogroups.com, Luna
                            <lunagoddess82@...> wrote:

                            > but there are other examples
                            > in which the rule does not apply; in fact, "their" is
                            > a prime example. There is no "c" in "their."

                            Other examples of not following the rule are 'neigh, neighbor,neither,
                            and either'.
                          • Luna
                            Gina, In the case of rhetoric/rhetorical and logic/logical, these are nouns vs. adjectives, i.e. I won t listen to your rhetoric versus I m asking a
                            Message 13 of 24 , Jun 6, 2007
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                              Gina,

                              In the case of "rhetoric/rhetorical" and
                              "logic/logical," these are nouns vs. adjectives, i.e.
                              "I won't listen to your rhetoric" versus "I'm asking a
                              rhetorical question," "What brand of logic is that?"
                              versus "I made the most logical choice." In the first
                              case, the word itself is the noun, whereas in the
                              second case, it is describing the noun. Usually, that
                              is the way this rule works; however, as we've seen,
                              sometimes both forms of the word (as in
                              "semiotic/semiotical") have the same meaning. I think
                              that as long as the -ic word can stand alone as a
                              noun, the rule applies... otherwise, you just have to
                              figure out what the most common form is, or keep using
                              spellcheck... which doesn't really help unless the
                              word you're trying to use isn't a valid word. :) Just
                              like myself trying to learn Dutch, German, or any
                              other language for that matter, it's a lot easier when
                              you are raised hearing, speaking, and writing it. :)

                              ~Luna




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                            • Godwin Stewart
                              On Wed, 6 Jun 2007 06:27:49 -0700 (PDT), Luna ... Yes, but the rule only applies to words where the ie or ei is pronounced as
                              Message 14 of 24 , Jun 6, 2007
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                                On Wed, 6 Jun 2007 06:27:49 -0700 (PDT), Luna <lunagoddess82@...>
                                wrote:

                                > I was intending to use, but there are other examples
                                > in which the rule does not apply; in fact, "their" is
                                > a prime example. There is no "c" in "their."

                                Yes, but the rule only applies to words where the "ie" or "ei" is
                                pronounced as "ee". "Their" is not one of those words, which is why the
                                rule doesn't apply to it.

                                --
                                G. Stewart - gstewart@...

                                "Thank you for calling the Incontinence hotline. Please hold."
                              • Godwin Stewart
                                ... These words aren t supposed to follow the rule in the first place because they aren t pronounced ee (as in cheese ). Some people pronounce either and
                                Message 15 of 24 , Jun 6, 2007
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                                  On Wed, 06 Jun 2007 13:36:35 -0000, "Mid" <graycicak@...> wrote:

                                  > Other examples of not following the rule are 'neigh, neighbor,neither,
                                  > and either'.

                                  These words aren't supposed to follow the rule in the first place
                                  because they aren't pronounced "ee" (as in "cheese").

                                  Some people pronounce "either" and "neither" as "eether" and "neether"
                                  but this is incorrect. The "ei" in them should be pronounced as "eye".

                                  --
                                  G. Stewart - gstewart@...

                                  NOTICE:
                                  -- THE ELEVATORS WILL BE OUT OF ORDER TODAY --
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                                • Luna
                                  ... eether and neether ... This is true of proper or The Queen s English; however in America everyone says neether and eether. It s really more of
                                  Message 16 of 24 , Jun 6, 2007
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                                    >Some people pronounce "either" and "neither" >as
                                    "eether" and "neether"
                                    >but this is incorrect. The "ei" in them should be
                                    >pronounced as "eye".

                                    This is true of "proper" or "The Queen's" English;
                                    however in America everyone says "neether" and
                                    "eether." It's really more of a dialect issue in the
                                    States... for a natural-born American to say
                                    "eye-ther" rather than "eether" is considered to be
                                    pretentious here, the same as someone who pronounces
                                    "schedule" like "shed-yool." As far as British
                                    travelers, we just consider it a "British" accent. So
                                    I wouldn't call it an "incorrect" pronunciation, it's
                                    just American English. On the other hand, I wouldn't
                                    worry a whole lot if you are from a country that does
                                    not speak English, and plan to come to America;
                                    undoubtedly you can't speak any worse English than
                                    most Americans.

                                    ~Luna



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                                  • janishindman
                                    I hadn t realised that the rule only applied as you say Godwin. That explains a lot. By any chance do you know whether there is any rule about when we use past
                                    Message 17 of 24 , Jun 6, 2007
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                                      I hadn't realised that the rule only applied as you say Godwin. That
                                      explains a lot.

                                      By any chance do you know whether there is any rule about when we use
                                      past participles with the -t ending rather than the -ed ending, eg
                                      spelt, learnt, leapt etc?


                                      > > I was intending to use, but there are other examples
                                      > > in which the rule does not apply; in fact, "their" is
                                      > > a prime example. There is no "c" in "their."
                                      >
                                      > Yes, but the rule only applies to words where the "ie" or "ei" is
                                      > pronounced as "ee". "Their" is not one of those words, which is why the
                                      > rule doesn't apply to it.
                                      >
                                      > --
                                      > G. Stewart - gstewart@...
                                      >
                                      > "Thank you for calling the Incontinence hotline. Please hold."
                                      >
                                    • Godwin Stewart
                                      On Thu, 07 Jun 2007 05:37:02 -0000, janishindman ... AFAIK, we just learn them as-is. I m not aware of any such rules - but then again I m not a language
                                      Message 18 of 24 , Jun 7, 2007
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                                        On Thu, 07 Jun 2007 05:37:02 -0000, "janishindman"
                                        <janishindman@...> wrote:

                                        > By any chance do you know whether there is any rule about when we use
                                        > past participles with the -t ending rather than the -ed ending, eg
                                        > spelt, learnt, leapt etc?

                                        AFAIK, we just learn them as-is. I'm not aware of any such rules - but
                                        then again I'm not a language teacher.

                                        BTW, it's "spelled" and "learned" :)

                                        --
                                        G. Stewart - gstewart@...

                                        Bills travel through mail at twice the speed of checks.
                                      • Leigh Priest
                                        Hallo, I read once that the use is not really grammatical, but by ear: whichever sounds best! Leigh
                                        Message 19 of 24 , Jun 7, 2007
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                                          Hallo,

                                          I read once that the use is not really grammatical, but by
                                          ear: whichever sounds best!

                                          Leigh

                                          At 09:27 07/06/2007, you wrote:
                                          >By any chance do you know whether there is any rule about when we use
                                          > > past participles with the -t ending rather than the -ed ending, eg
                                          > > spelt, learnt, leapt etc?
                                        • Godwin Stewart
                                          On Thu, 07 Jun 2007 09:33:37 +0100, Leigh Priest ... Not at all, no. However, it might vary between US English and British English. I learned British English,
                                          Message 20 of 24 , Jun 7, 2007
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                                            On Thu, 07 Jun 2007 09:33:37 +0100, Leigh Priest
                                            <leighpriest@...> wrote:

                                            > I read once that the use is not really grammatical, but by
                                            > ear: whichever sounds best!

                                            Not at all, no. However, it might vary between US English and British
                                            English. I learned British English, and I learned it at a time when
                                            corporal punishment was still commonplace in schools, so I learned it
                                            well!

                                            --
                                            G. Stewart - gstewart@...

                                            "The two most common things in the universe are hydrogen and stupidity."
                                          • Leigh Priest
                                            Dear Godwin, What is the difference? I can t seem to find it in my usage books. I m confused now. Best wishes, Leigh ... AFAIK, we just learn them as-is. I m
                                            Message 21 of 24 , Jun 7, 2007
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                                              Dear Godwin,

                                              What is the difference? I can't seem to find it in my usage
                                              books. I'm confused now.

                                              Best wishes,
                                              Leigh

                                              > By any chance do you know whether there is any rule about when we use
                                              > past participles with the -t ending rather than the -ed ending, eg
                                              > spelt, learnt, leapt etc?

                                              AFAIK, we just learn them as-is. I'm not aware of any such rules - but
                                              then again I'm not a language teacher.

                                              BTW, it's "spelled" and "learned" :)

                                              --
                                              G. Stewart - <mailto:gstewart%40spamcop.net>gstewart@...




                                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                            • gina14it
                                              ... It becomes even more confusing; earlier I used intuition, now I tend to ponder about the variants :) So, if I have to say logical operation, what about
                                              Message 22 of 24 , Jun 7, 2007
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                                                > In the case of "rhetoric/rhetorical" and
                                                > "logic/logical," these are nouns vs. adjectives, i.e.
                                                > "I won't listen to your rhetoric" versus "I'm asking a
                                                > rhetorical question," "What brand of logic is that?"
                                                > versus "I made the most logical choice." In the first
                                                > case, the word itself is the noun, whereas in the
                                                > second case, it is describing the noun.

                                                It becomes even more confusing; earlier I used intuition, now I tend
                                                to ponder about the variants :) So, if I have to say 'logical'
                                                operation, what about 'linguistic/linguistical(?)' operation?
                                                'Semiotical' sounds stupid to me (and also to spell checker). And I
                                                thought the noun was 'rhetorics' and not 'rhetoric', same as
                                                'linguistics' and not 'linguistic' (the science of functional
                                                linguistics).

                                                Another question:
                                                what is more appropriate in an academic text: 'everyone', 'everybody'
                                                or any other construction?
                                              • Godwin Stewart
                                                On Thu, 07 Jun 2007 10:08:41 +0100, Leigh Priest ... Actually, I ve just seen that the Concise Oxford Dictionary and Tome II of the Oxford Library of English
                                                Message 23 of 24 , Jun 7, 2007
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                                                  On Thu, 07 Jun 2007 10:08:41 +0100, Leigh Priest
                                                  <leighpriest@...> wrote:

                                                  > What is the difference? I can't seem to find it in my usage
                                                  > books.

                                                  Actually, I've just seen that the Concise Oxford Dictionary and Tome II
                                                  of the Oxford Library of English Usage give both spellings (learned and
                                                  learnt), with "learned" as the main spelling, however, and "learnt" as
                                                  an alternative spelling.

                                                  --
                                                  G. Stewart - gstewart@...

                                                  Microsoft Palladium: "Where the hell do you think YOU'RE going today?"
                                                • Luna
                                                  ... Indeed, this is the rule of thumb I have always used! ... you grow up hearing and speaking it! I work with a girl who has a roommate from Maastricht (which
                                                  Message 24 of 24 , Jun 13, 2007
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                                                    >I read once that the use is not really grammatical,
                                                    >but by ear: whichever sounds best!

                                                    Indeed, this is the rule of thumb I have always used!
                                                    :) Of course, like any language, it's much easier if
                                                    you grow up hearing and speaking it! I work with a
                                                    girl who has a roommate from Maastricht (which was a
                                                    trip as I stayed there about 3 blocks from where he
                                                    lived!). So, I talked with him at length about English
                                                    and Dutch, trying out a couple of phrases just to see
                                                    if I was getting them right. Of course, I wasn't.
                                                    *lol* I used a phrase and he said if I walked up and
                                                    said that to someone they would think I was retarded.
                                                    He told me what I should say instead, and for the life
                                                    of me, I can't remember what that phrase was!

                                                    The "Laura Speaks Dutch" site is wonderful, and I
                                                    recommend it highly to anyone who wants to learn some
                                                    Dutch. I am still working on pronunciation as well as
                                                    the alphabet and greetings, so I haven't gotten very
                                                    far (work is a priority), but I am making a little
                                                    progress here and there. It is suffocatingly hot in
                                                    Florida right now, so I find myself missing Holland
                                                    more and more! :)

                                                    Tot horens! :)
                                                    ~Luna


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