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Re: A new start or new start.

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  • Ross
    Thanks for your kind reply..:-) For the last time, What if I say just, new start , without adding a or the? especially when I know it could be counted? is it
    Message 1 of 4 , Jan 31, 2007
      Thanks for your kind reply..:-)
      For the last time,
      What if I say just,
      new start , without adding a or the?
      especially when I know it could be counted?

      is it grammatically accepted?

      Thanks~











      --- In DUTCH-ENGLISH-STUDY-GROUP@yahoogroups.com, Godwin Stewart
      <gstewart@...> wrote:
      >
      > On Wed, 31 Jan 2007 14:06:24 -0000, "Ross" <qlseovks@...> wrote:
      >
      > > Is it simple as that the former puts an emphasis on that start
      > > being one among many and the latter for an emphasis on the fact
      > > that it's just surprising START?
      >
      > "a" and "an" are what's called the "indefinite article" (as opposed
      to
      > "the", which is the "definite article", or "this" and "that", which
      are
      > "demonstrative articles").
      >
      > Some things in languages can be counted individually, like apples,
      cups
      > and mice - you can count three apples, one cup and about 25 million
      > mice in a house :) Some things cannot be counted individually, but
      > quantified by volume or weight instead - you wouldn't talk about an
      air
      > and a half or 2 flours, but you would 10 litres of air and a kilo of
      > flour.
      >
      > When you're not using a definite article - because you're not
      pointing
      > out precisely which object is under discussion - you'd use an
      > indefinite article with "countable" objects, and no article with
      > objects that can't be counted.
      >
      > So, since this isn't *the* new start that someone in particular has
      > been dreaming of, you wouldn't use the definite article. A start,
      or a
      > beginning, *is* something that can be counted, so it requires the
      > indefinite article: "this is a new start".
      >
      > Had it been one of the objects that can't be counted, you would have
      > not used an article at all: "this is fresh air", or "this is old
      flour".
      >
      > However, in the plural form, you'd use no article even though the
      > objects can be counted (obviously, because there's more than one of
      > them): "these are ripe peaches".
      >
      > --
      > G. Stewart - gstewart@...
      >
      > Reporter (to Mahatma Gandhi):
      > "Mr. Gandhi, what do you think of Western civilisation?"
      > Gandhi:
      > "I think it would be a good idea."
      >
    • Godwin Stewart
      ... New start on its own doesn t make sense. However, you could use it as the title of a book or something like that, where a sematically and syntactically
      Message 2 of 4 , Feb 1, 2007
        On Thu, 01 Feb 2007 07:25:03 -0000, "Ross" <qlseovks@...> wrote:

        > What if I say just,
        > new start , without adding a or the?
        > especially when I know it could be counted?

        "New start" on its own doesn't make sense. However, you could use it as
        the title of a book or something like that, where a sematically and
        syntactically correct sentence isn't required.

        --
        G. Stewart - gstewart@...

        Spotted in a toilet of a London office:
        TOILET OUT OF ORDER. PLEASE USE FLOOR BELOW.
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