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"en een"?, etc

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  • Penny Tipper
    Welkom in 2003 iedereen! This is another thing that s been confusing me for a while too: Ik wens jullie allemaal een heel goed,gelukkig **en een** gezond
    Message 1 of 6 , Jan 1, 2003
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      Welkom in 2003 iedereen! This is another thing that's
      been confusing me for a while too:

      Ik wens jullie allemaal een heel goed,gelukkig **en
      een** gezond nieuwjaar toe.

      Which word out of the "en een" cluster has a more
      reduced vowel, or are they both pronounced the same,
      or does 'en' never get reduced like een does? Ik dank
      voor Uw hulp.

      Dr. KiwiOrka wrote:
      >
      > But do you mean "special" or "spatial"?
      >
      Cuz I wrote:

      > Even if your grammar's perfekt, there's some spacial
      > skills required voor visiting a foreign land.
      > Ja'wel!
      >
      Whoops got me there. English is weird, but not as
      weird as dutch. What is there an 's' sound at the end
      of words like "Informatie"? Is it another French
      spin-off?

      Oh and that was interesting about how versions of
      "duytsch" and "deutsch" and "duits" used to be a
      common identification for what we consider such a
      broad range of peoples today. I sure got that one
      wrong. But Dutch use "duits" to mean German, don't
      they? That all sounds really confusing. Are there
      versions of this word in languages like Danish and
      Swedish and Norwegian too? Do we have one in English?
      Oh right, it's Dutch. Have a great day everybody!

      --Penny

      ______________________________________________________________________
      Post your free ad now! http://personals.yahoo.ca
    • Courtney Parker <parkerc@itrwe.nl>
      prettige Kerstdagen en een gelukkig nieuwjaar en is short and quick like saying N in english and with een it is a lil longer everytime I say it, it is a
      Message 2 of 6 , Jan 1, 2003
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        prettige Kerstdagen en een gelukkig nieuwjaar

        en is short and quick like saying N in english and with een it is a
        lil' longer everytime I say it, it is a longer and stronger sounding

        ik heb een bank en een tafel in mijn woonkamer
        I have a couch and a tafel so you emphaise the "a"
        it is kind of like english to.........

        is that what you mean

        Oh puppy is sleeping my chance to get some sleep too......

        --- In DUTCH-ENGLISH-STUDY-GROUP@yahoogroups.com, Penny Tipper
        <pennystipper@y...> wrote:
        > Welkom in 2003 iedereen! This is another thing that's
        > been confusing me for a while too:
        >
        > Ik wens jullie allemaal een heel goed,gelukkig **en
        > een** gezond nieuwjaar toe.
        >
        > Which word out of the "en een" cluster has a more
        > reduced vowel, or are they both pronounced the same,
        > or does 'en' never get reduced like een does? Ik dank
        > voor Uw hulp.
        >
        > Dr. KiwiOrka wrote:
        > >
        > > But do you mean "special" or "spatial"?
        > >
        > Cuz I wrote:
        >
        > > Even if your grammar's perfekt, there's some spacial
        > > skills required voor visiting a foreign land.
        > > Ja'wel!
        > >
        > Whoops got me there. English is weird, but not as
        > weird as dutch. What is there an 's' sound at the end
        > of words like "Informatie"? Is it another French
        > spin-off?
        >
        > Oh and that was interesting about how versions of
        > "duytsch" and "deutsch" and "duits" used to be a
        > common identification for what we consider such a
        > broad range of peoples today. I sure got that one
        > wrong. But Dutch use "duits" to mean German, don't
        > they? That all sounds really confusing. Are there
        > versions of this word in languages like Danish and
        > Swedish and Norwegian too? Do we have one in English?
        > Oh right, it's Dutch. Have a great day everybody!
        >
        > --Penny
        >
        >
        ______________________________________________________________________

        > Post your free ad now! http://personals.yahoo.ca
      • larsbol <larsbol@yahoo.com>
        Hello! Penny wrote: Are there ... Duits - deutsch in danish is tysk and in swedish tyska both words only mean german. When we speak of the the dutch
        Message 3 of 6 , Jan 5, 2003
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          Hello!

          Penny wrote:
          Are there
          > versions of this word in languages like Danish and
          > Swedish and Norwegian too? Do we have one in English?
          > Oh right, it's Dutch. Have a great day everybody!
          >
          > --Penny

          Duits - deutsch in danish is "tysk" and in swedish "tyska" both words
          only mean german. When we speak of the the dutch language we say in
          swedish nederlandska/hollandska.

          Tot ziens

          Lars
          Malmö Sweden


          --- In DUTCH-ENGLISH-STUDY-GROUP@yahoogroups.com, Penny Tipper
          <pennystipper@y...> wrote:
          > Welkom in 2003 iedereen! This is another thing that's
          > been confusing me for a while too:
          >
          > Ik wens jullie allemaal een heel goed,gelukkig **en
          > een** gezond nieuwjaar toe.
          >
          > Which word out of the "en een" cluster has a more
          > reduced vowel, or are they both pronounced the same,
          > or does 'en' never get reduced like een does? Ik dank
          > voor Uw hulp.
          >
          > Dr. KiwiOrka wrote:
          > >
          > > But do you mean "special" or "spatial"?
          > >
          > Cuz I wrote:
          >
          > > Even if your grammar's perfekt, there's some spacial
          > > skills required voor visiting a foreign land.
          > > Ja'wel!
          > >
          > Whoops got me there. English is weird, but not as
          > weird as dutch. What is there an 's' sound at the end
          > of words like "Informatie"? Is it another French
          > spin-off?
          >
          > Oh and that was interesting about how versions of
          > "duytsch" and "deutsch" and "duits" used to be a
          > common identification for what we consider such a
          > broad range of peoples today. I sure got that one
          > wrong. But Dutch use "duits" to mean German, don't
          > they? That all sounds really confusing. Are there
          > versions of this word in languages like Danish and
          > Swedish and Norwegian too? Do we have one in English?
          > Oh right, it's Dutch. Have a great day everybody!
          >
          > --Penny
          >
          >
          ______________________________________________________________________

          > Post your free ad now! http://personals.yahoo.ca
        • niels <niels.winther@dfdsseaways.com>
          ... an earlier spelling was tydsk . It is easy to see that italian tedesco is from the same stock. cheers niels
          Message 4 of 6 , Jan 5, 2003
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            --- Lars wrote:
            > Duits - deutsch in danish is "tysk"
            > and in swedish "tyska" both words only
            > mean german. ...

            an earlier spelling was "tydsk".

            It is easy to see that italian
            "tedesco" is from the same stock.

            cheers
            niels
          • Silvia Franke
            Hi Niels, ... And they are from the same stock as duits or deutsch . -- Cya, Car http://www.silviafranke.de Fußball TOTAL - die Mailingliste für
            Message 5 of 6 , Jan 5, 2003
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              Hi Niels,

              >> Duits - deutsch in danish is "tysk"
              >> and in swedish "tyska" both words only
              >> mean german. ...

              > an earlier spelling was "tydsk".

              > It is easy to see that italian
              > "tedesco" is from the same stock.

              And they are from the same stock as "duits" or "deutsch".



              --
              Cya, Car
              http://www.silviafranke.de
              Fußball TOTAL - die Mailingliste für Fußball-Fans: http://www.fussball-total.de.vu
            • niels <niels.winther@dfdsseaways.com>
              ... yes, the common form in this case would be something like theudisk ; but there are cognates in many languages since there is a common i.e. root behind
              Message 6 of 6 , Jan 5, 2003
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                --- Silvia Franke wrote:
                > Hi Niels,
                > > Lars:
                > >> Duits - deutsch in danish is "tysk"
                > >> and in swedish "tyska" both words only
                > >> mean german. ...
                >
                > > an earlier spelling was "tydsk".
                >
                > > It is easy to see that italian
                > > "tedesco" is from the same stock.
                >
                > And they are from the same stock as "duits" or "deutsch".

                yes, the common form in this case would be
                something like "theudisk";
                but there are cognates in many languages
                since there is a common i.e. root behind
                meaning perhaps simply 'people'.
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