Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

RE: [DSR-2-DOT] THE CITY'S FIRST ATTEMPT AT PUBLIC TRANSIT BEGAN ON THIS DATE IN 1921, 2/1/2013, 12:15 am

Expand Messages
  • Russell Mack
    The track terminated at Alter Rd. where Ye Olde Tap Room is today with a wye setup. At one point the city parked cars in the Tap Room s parking lot when they
    Message 1 of 2 , Feb 1, 2013
      The track terminated at Alter Rd. where Ye Olde Tap Room is today with a wye setup.  At one point the city parked cars in the Tap Room's parking lot when they were not permitted to cross the DUR's track at St.jean and Mack.  The building that I own at 2900 Alter became a "comfort Station" for the riders complete with a blind pig in the basement.  I managed to aquire several pieces of the original track when the city put in new water lines across Charlevoix 

      From: DSR-2-DOT@yahoogroups.com
      To: DSR-2-DOT@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Fri, 1 Feb 2013 05:11:41 +0000
      Subject: [DSR-2-DOT] THE CITY'S FIRST ATTEMPT AT PUBLIC TRANSIT BEGAN ON THIS DATE IN 1921, 2/1/2013, 12:15 am



      Reminder from: DSR-2-DOT Yahoo! Group
       
      Title: THE CITY'S FIRST ATTEMPT AT PUBLIC TRANSIT BEGAN ON THIS DATE IN 1921
       
      Date: Friday February 1, 2013
      Time: 12:15 am - 12:15 am (GMT-05.00) Eastern Time (US & Canada)
      Location: City of Detroit, MI (1921)
      Notes: On this date in Detroit Transit History: FIRST CITY-OWNED STREETCAR SYSTEM BEGAN

      On Tuesday, February 1, 1921, the City of Detroit began operating a small street railway operation to compete against the privately-owned Detroit United Railway (DUR) company. Initially known as the Municipal Operation, the city-owned system began its first day with only two lines totaling 13 miles, and a fleet of sixteen small Birney streetcars operating out of a yard located on Shoemaker and St. Jean streets. The fare was 5� with free transfers being issued between the two lines.

      Those first two lines included a "Crosstown" line built along Charlevoix and Buchanan streets, and a much shorter line along St. Jean Avenue, which was originally built to provide the city-owned cars the trackage needed to reach Charlevoix Avenue from the Shoemaker Yard.

      But the small city-run operation continued to expand through the building of more lines, and by the taking over of many DUR routes. This was accomplished by the city's denial to renew franchise agreements with the DUR when their operating rights on those line expired. With the hand-writing on the wall, the company finally decided to sell its city street railway operation to the City of Detroit, which formed the municipal-owned Department of Street Railways (DSR) to operate the DUR lines in Detroit.

      That small original municipal operation was also absorbed by the DSR, which began operations on May 15, 1922.
       
      Copyright © 2013  Yahoo! Inc. All Rights Reserved | Terms of Service | Privacy Policy


    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.