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Re: Masaplalang Bayung Banua 2013

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  • Marc M. Mangalindan
    Atching Carol, Angga’t e milaco ing casaquiman o ing panga-materalista ning tau, alang catajimican queti qng yatu; nanupata, talagang masaquit yang calisan
    Message 1 of 5 , Jan 5, 2013
      Atching Carol,

      Angga’t e milaco ing casaquiman o ing panga-materalista ning tau, alang catajimican queti qng yatu; nanupata, talagang masaquit yang calisan ing “power play” – uling buri na ning metung at metung “carela” o “quecatamu”, iya ing “bida” queng nanumang catatagan o capagnasan.

      Macanyan man, mamasa ta mung sana misan a aldo migising ta mu, o caya deng anac da reng anac ta mu, at ing quegana-gana salese ngan.

      Dacal a salamat, Atching Carol; pauli ning quecatang talamitam ngening aldo a iti, asulat cu ne naman ining macatuquing articulu.

      LANGUAGE AND POWER

      (By Marciano M. Mangalindan, 06 January 2013)

      One obvious feature of how language operates in social interactions is its relationship with power, both influential and instrumental. Neither rule nor law, neither discipline nor hierarchy sanctions influential power. It inclines us or makes us want to behave in certain ways or adopt opinions or attitudes, without obvious force. It operates in such social phenomena as advertising, culture and the media. (Strictly, we are not coerced into buying what the advertiser shows us, nor will we suffer any penalty for our "sales resistance".) Instrumental power is explicit power of the sort imposed by the state, by its laws and conventions or by the organizations for which we work. It operates in business, education and various kinds of management. (In many, but not in all cases, if we resist instrumental power, we will be subject to some penalty or in trouble.)

      In some spheres of social activity, such as politics or law, both kinds of power may be present at the same time:

      a.. we are subject to laws (enforced by penalties), but
      b.. some legal processes, such as trial by jury, rely on attempts to persuade.
      Politicians impose laws, taxes, and bureaucratic systems (instrumental power) but seek to influence us to endorse their policies or turn out to vote for them (influential power). They may wish to influence us to use our collective power to return them to office, where they will use their executive power to direct some aspects of our lives - a curious paradox of our system of parliamentary democratic representation. (That is they get us to give them the power to tell us what to do and how to live. And we really do have the choice, collectively, as we show when we vote for a change of government.)

      In looking at how power is exercised through language, we should be able to refer to real examples we have found, and explain these texts. But we should also have a theoretical approach that will enable us to interpret language data we are presented with in an examination. Among other things, we should look at pragmatics and speech act theory, lexis and semantics (forms and meanings), forms that include or exclude (insiders or outsiders), structures (at phrase, clause and discourse level), forms of address, phatic tokens, as well as structural features of speech, which may be used to exercise or establish power. And in some contexts, we will need to be able to show how rhetorical devices are used to influence an audience .

      Consider, for example, how conversational maxims may be adapted for reasons of expedience, rather than integrity. Does all power corrupt in language, as it does generally?

      LUWID,

      Marc

      --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

      From: Carol Guanzon
      Sent: Sunday, January 06, 2013 1:57 PM
      To: Marc M. Mangalindan
      Subject: Re: Masaplalang Bayung Banua 2013

      Cang Marc Mangalindan,
      Tutu pu ing sinulat yu, Balamu macabusal qng pamanialba queng quecatamung
      Cultura at Amanu dacal a "power play" acaquit tamu. Masaquit pung calisan ing
      "power play" qng nanumang catatagan o capagnasan, ne pu? Ating mapilan a taung
      bisang "mag-bida" nucarin man.

      Mabilis yang linabas in 2012. Dinalusung yang misna carapal. Sana ing 2013
      magbanayad yang bagya bang canita mas apilasa tamu ing quecatamung paque
      qng bie at ing nanumang capagnasan a dapat tamung gauan.

      Cang Marc, dacal a salamat at tinggap ye ing cacung taimtim a "pamangumusta" quecayu.
      Matula cu abasa que ing quecayung articulu. Malino ya panga-sulat dapot atin ya
      namang malungcut a catutuan dapat tamung arapan. Ing Tagalog balamu masican ya
      calauat qng Pampanga. Acaquit cu careng barangay abibisita cu istung mumuli cu
      Pampanga, Tagalog ing salita da reng queraclan. Macanian man, e tamu dapat pai-sira lub.
      Lulugud,
      Atching Carol






      --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      From: Marc M. Mangalindan <MarcMangalindan@...>
      To: Carol Guanzon <steelmoxie2@...>
      Cc: ANASI <AmanungSisuan@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Saturday, January 5, 2013 9:24 PM
      Subject: Re: Masaplalang Bayung Banua 2013


      Caluguran ming Ca Carol (at careng aliwang capatad queng Amanung Sisuan):

      Masaplalang Bayung Banua quecayu ampo pa careng caluguran yu queng bie; capagnasan cu ampo ning canacung pamilya a sana ing Banuang 2013 maging progresibu ya quecatamu ngan.

      Ita sigurung articulu cung “LANGUAGE CONSERVATION” a melimbag queng grupu ta mung DILA iyang abasa yu. nung nucarin asambitla cu carin a “... political decisions on language issues may have a huge impact on preservation or disappearance of linguistic diversity in a society. A language policy can serve as a political instrument, designated either to build an integrated (or assimilated) monolingual society or to promote the co-existence of multi-culturality and multi-linguism what would enrich all engaged parties.”

      Metung cu careng mamantabe queng capagnasan ta mung asalba ta ya ing quecatamung pacamalang Amanung Sisuan; at sana, micacasundu ta mu ngan at ilaco ing “power play”. Acu pin quetang catataulian cung pasquil queng Facebook: “When the power of love overcomes the love of power, then the world will be at peace.”

      LUWID,

      Marc M. Mangalindan


      --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

      From: Carol Guanzon
      Sent: Sunday, January 06, 2013 12:13 PM
      To: From: Marc M. Mangalindan
      Subject: Masaplalang Bayung Banua 2013

      Calugurang Cang Marc Mangalindan
      Abasa que pu itang sinulat yu tungcul qng "Language...etc..etc..."
      Sana pu ing pamisaup-saup tamung isalba ing Amanu at Culturang
      Capampangan e mu paninap. Sana pu ing patacaran ning DepEd 74
      maging matagumpe.

      May you and your love ones enjoy the best all through the year.

      Peace on Earth and Faith and Hope
      Warm greetings and joy to you
      May your dreams for 2013
      And your wishes all come true.

      Lulugud,
      Carol Sicat Guanzon
      Author: LUGUD Poems I and II





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Marc M. Mangalindan
      Atching Carol, For me, language and culture are NOT fundamentally inseparable. At the most basic level, language is a method of expressing ideas. That is,
      Message 2 of 5 , Jan 6, 2013
        Atching Carol,

        For me, language and culture are NOT fundamentally inseparable. At the most basic level, language is a method of expressing ideas. That is, language is communication; while usually verbal, language can also be visual (via signs and symbols), or semiotics (via hand or body gestures). Culture, on the other hand, is a specific set of ideas, practices, customs and beliefs which make up a functioning society as distinct.

        A culture must have at least one language, which it uses as a distinct medium of communication to conveys its defining ideas, customs, beliefs, et al., from one member of the culture to another member. Cultures can develop multiple languages, or "borrow" languages from other cultures to use; not all such languages are co-equal in the culture. One of the major defining characteristics of a culture is which language(s) are the primary means of communication in that culture; sociologists and anthropologists draw lines between similar cultures heavily based on the prevalent language usage.

        Languages, on the other hand, can be developed (or evolve) apart from its originating culture. Certain languages have scope for cross-cultural adaptations and communication, and may not actually be part of any culture. Additionally, many languages are used by different cultures (that is, the same language can be used in several cultures).

        Language is heavily influenced by culture - as cultures come up with new ideas, they develop language components to express those ideas. The reverse is also true: the limits of a language can define what is expressible in a culture (that is, the limits of a language can prevent certain concepts from being part of a culture).

        Finally, languages are not solely defined by their developing culture(s) - most modern languages are amalgamations of other prior and current languages. That is, most languages borrow words and phrases ("loan words") from other existing languages to describe new ideas and concept. In fact, in the modern very-connected world, once one language manufactures a new word to describe something, there is a very strong tendency for other languages to "steal" that word directly, rather than manufacture a unique one itself. The English language is a stellar example of a "thief" language - by some accounts, over 60% of the English language is of foreign origin (i.e. those words were originally imported from another language). Conversely, English is currently the world's largest "donor" language, with vast quantities of English words being imported directly into virtually all other languages.

        Marc

        --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

        From: Carol Guanzon
        Sent: Sunday, January 06, 2013 4:20 PM
        To: Marc M. Mangalindan
        Subject: Re: Masaplalang Bayung Banua 2013

        Cang Marc ,

        Cabilis mung misip at sumulat. Mecatatlung besis que binasa ing Language and Power a sinulat mung agad agad. Nung maliari sana, dinan mu cung adua-atlung aldo bang canita lubus queng aisip ing calamnan ning sinulat mu. Macanian man, ing prumeru mung paragraph malaman ya catutuan.

        "One obvious feature of how language operates in social interactions is its relationship with power, both influential and instrumental. Neither rule nor law, neither discipline nor hierarchy sanctions influential power. It inclines us or makes us want to behave in certain ways or adopt opinions or attitudes, without obvious force. It operates in such social phenomena as advertising, culture and the media."


        I am straddling between two thoughts regarding saving a language. Is it the language? Or, is it the culture sandwiched in the language that sneaks into the psyche and finds an outlet in the expression of the language?Culture and language are so tightly meshed together, only a hair divdes a clear distinction between them.

        This fact is a big concern of mine. Can we save a language without first saving a culture? I am very aware that all linguistic speech forms sneak into one's acquired native langauge. But does linguistic expression the standard trademark of that language without the cultural soul locked into it? Example, I studied Japanese for 5 years. I can speak learned Japanese according to the rules I studied. But do I really speak Japanese without sounding a foreigner? I found out that I needed to dig myself into the culture to sound decent and true.

        Maybe, I am wrong. Again, only a tiny thread divides the right and wrong. Who is to judge? The native born and grown into that culture and language.


        Cang Marc, panupaya mu cu rugu. Mipacaba ya ing email cu. Casi, pepa-isip mu cu ruge.

        Lulugud,

        Atching Carol


        Again, thank you for your provative short essay.
        Lulugud,
        Atching Carol


        --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        From: Marc M. Mangalindan <MarcMangalindan@...>
        To: Carol Guanzon <steelmoxie2@...>
        Cc: ANASI <AmanungSisuan@yahoogroups.com>; DILA <DILA@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Saturday, January 5, 2013 11:18 PM
        Subject: Re: Masaplalang Bayung Banua 2013


        Atching Carol,

        Angga’t e milaco ing casaquiman o ing panga-materalista ning tau, alang catajimican queti qng yatu; nanupata, talagang masaquit yang calisan ing “power play” – uling buri na ning metung at metung “carela” o “quecatamu”, iya ing “bida” queng nanumang catatagan o capagnasan.

        Macanyan man, mamasa ta mung sana misan a aldo migising ta mu, o caya deng anac da reng anac ta mu, at ing quegana-gana salese ngan.

        Dacal a salamat, Atching Carol; pauli ning quecatang talamitam ngening aldo a iti, asulat cu ne naman ining macatuquing articulu.

        LANGUAGE AND POWER
        (By Marciano M. Mangalindan, 06 January 2013)
        One obvious feature of how language operates in social interactions is its relationship with power, both influential and instrumental. Neither rule nor law, neither discipline nor hierarchy sanctions influential power. It inclines us or makes us want to behave in certain ways or adopt opinions or attitudes, without obvious force. It operates in such social phenomena as advertising, culture and the media. (Strictly, we are not coerced into buying what the advertiser shows us, nor will we suffer any penalty for our "sales resistance".) Instrumental power is explicit power of the sort imposed by the state, by its laws and conventions or by the organizations for which we work. It operates in business, education and various kinds of management. (In many, but not in all cases, if we resist instrumental power, we will be subject to some penalty or in trouble.)
        In some spheres of social activity, such as politics or law, both kinds of power may be present at the same time:
        a.. we are subject to laws (enforced by penalties), but
        b.. some legal processes, such as trial by jury, rely on attempts to persuade.
        Politicians impose laws, taxes, and bureaucratic systems (instrumental power) but seek to influence us to endorse their policies or turn out to vote for them (influential power). They may wish to influence us to use our collective power to return them to office, where they will use their executive power to direct some aspects of our lives - a curious paradox of our system of parliamentary democratic representation. (That is they get us to give them the power to tell us what to do and how to live. And we really do have the choice, collectively, as we show when we vote for a change of government.)
        In looking at how power is exercised through language, we should be able to refer to real examples we have found, and explain these texts. But we should also have a theoretical approach that will enable us to interpret language data we are presented with in an examination. Among other things, we should look at pragmatics and speech act theory, lexis and semantics (forms and meanings), forms that include or exclude (insiders or outsiders), structures (at phrase, clause and discourse level), forms of address, phatic tokens, as well as structural features of speech, which may be used to exercise or establish power. And in some contexts, we will need to be able to show how rhetorical devices are used to influence an audience .
        Consider, for example, how conversational maxims may be adapted for reasons of expedience, rather than integrity. Does all power corrupt in language, as it does generally?

        LUWID,

        Marc

        --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

        From: Carol Guanzon
        Sent: Sunday, January 06, 2013 1:57 PM
        To: Marc M. Mangalindan
        Subject: Re: Masaplalang Bayung Banua 2013

        Cang Marc Mangalindan,
        Tutu pu ing sinulat yu, Balamu macabusal qng pamanialba queng quecatamung
        Cultura at Amanu dacal a "power play" acaquit tamu. Masaquit pung calisan ing
        "power play" qng nanumang catatagan o capagnasan, ne pu? Ating mapilan a taung
        bisang "mag-bida" nucarin man.

        Mabilis yang linabas in 2012. Dinalusung yang misna carapal. Sana ing 2013
        magbanayad yang bagya bang canita mas apilasa tamu ing quecatamung paque
        qng bie at ing nanumang capagnasan a dapat tamung gauan.

        Cang Marc, dacal a salamat at tinggap ye ing cacung taimtim a "pamangumusta" quecayu.
        Matula cu abasa que ing quecayung articulu. Malino ya panga-sulat dapot atin ya
        namang malungcut a catutuan dapat tamung arapan. Ing Tagalog balamu masican ya
        calauat qng Pampanga. Acaquit cu careng barangay abibisita cu istung mumuli cu
        Pampanga, Tagalog ing salita da reng queraclan. Macanian man, e tamu dapat pai-sira lub.
        Lulugud,
        Atching Carol






        --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        From: Marc M. Mangalindan <MarcMangalindan@...>
        To: Carol Guanzon <steelmoxie2@...>
        Cc: ANASI <AmanungSisuan@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Saturday, January 5, 2013 9:24 PM
        Subject: Re: Masaplalang Bayung Banua 2013


        Caluguran ming Ca Carol (at careng aliwang capatad queng Amanung Sisuan):

        Masaplalang Bayung Banua quecayu ampo pa careng caluguran yu queng bie; capagnasan cu ampo ning canacung pamilya a sana ing Banuang 2013 maging progresibu ya quecatamu ngan.

        Ita sigurung articulu cung “LANGUAGE CONSERVATION” a melimbag queng grupu ta mung DILA iyang abasa yu. nung nucarin asambitla cu carin a “... political decisions on language issues may have a huge impact on preservation or disappearance of linguistic diversity in a society. A language policy can serve as a political instrument, designated either to build an integrated (or assimilated) monolingual society or to promote the co-existence of multi-culturality and multi-linguism what would enrich all engaged parties.”

        Metung cu careng mamantabe queng capagnasan ta mung asalba ta ya ing quecatamung pacamalang Amanung Sisuan; at sana, micacasundu ta mu ngan at ilaco ing “power play”. Acu pin quetang catataulian cung pasquil queng Facebook: “When the power of love overcomes the love of power, then the world will be at peace.”

        LUWID,

        Marc M. Mangalindan


        --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

        From: Carol Guanzon
        Sent: Sunday, January 06, 2013 12:13 PM
        To: From: Marc M. Mangalindan
        Subject: Masaplalang Bayung Banua 2013

        Calugurang Cang Marc Mangalindan
        Abasa que pu itang sinulat yu tungcul qng "Language...etc..etc..."
        Sana pu ing pamisaup-saup tamung isalba ing Amanu at Culturang
        Capampangan e mu paninap. Sana pu ing patacaran ning DepEd 74
        maging matagumpe.

        May you and your love ones enjoy the best all through the year.

        Peace on Earth and Faith and Hope
        Warm greetings and joy to you
        May your dreams for 2013
        And your wishes all come true.

        Lulugud,
        Carol Sicat Guanzon
        Author: LUGUD Poems I and II








        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Paul Llido
        Many thanks Marc... This gave me the chance to analyze Capampangan... Beautiful !!! :) paulllido On Sun, Jan 6, 2013 at 3:18 PM, Marc M. Mangalindan
        Message 3 of 5 , Jan 6, 2013
          Many thanks Marc... This gave me the chance to analyze Capampangan...
          Beautiful !!! :) paulllido


          On Sun, Jan 6, 2013 at 3:18 PM, Marc M. Mangalindan <marcmangalindan@...
          > wrote:

          > **
          >
          >
          > Atching Carol,
          >
          > Angga�t e milaco ing casaquiman o ing panga-materalista ning tau, alang
          > catajimican queti qng yatu; nanupata, talagang masaquit yang calisan ing
          > �power play� � uling buri na ning metung at metung �carela� o �quecatamu�,
          > iya ing �bida� queng nanumang catatagan o capagnasan.
          >
          > Macanyan man, mamasa ta mung sana misan a aldo migising ta mu, o caya deng
          > anac da reng anac ta mu, at ing quegana-gana salese ngan.
          >
          > Dacal a salamat, Atching Carol; pauli ning quecatang talamitam ngening
          > aldo a iti, asulat cu ne naman ining macatuquing articulu.
          >
          > LANGUAGE AND POWER
          >
          > (By Marciano M. Mangalindan, 06 January 2013)
          >
          > One obvious feature of how language operates in social interactions is its
          > relationship with power, both influential and instrumental. Neither rule
          > nor law, neither discipline nor hierarchy sanctions influential power. It
          > inclines us or makes us want to behave in certain ways or adopt opinions or
          > attitudes, without obvious force. It operates in such social phenomena as
          > advertising, culture and the media. (Strictly, we are not coerced into
          > buying what the advertiser shows us, nor will we suffer any penalty for our
          > "sales resistance".) Instrumental power is explicit power of the sort
          > imposed by the state, by its laws and conventions or by the organizations
          > for which we work. It operates in business, education and various kinds of
          > management. (In many, but not in all cases, if we resist instrumental
          > power, we will be subject to some penalty or in trouble.)
          >
          > In some spheres of social activity, such as politics or law, both kinds of
          > power may be present at the same time:
          >
          > a.. we are subject to laws (enforced by penalties), but
          > b.. some legal processes, such as trial by jury, rely on attempts to
          > persuade.
          > Politicians impose laws, taxes, and bureaucratic systems (instrumental
          > power) but seek to influence us to endorse their policies or turn out to
          > vote for them (influential power). They may wish to influence us to use our
          > collective power to return them to office, where they will use their
          > executive power to direct some aspects of our lives - a curious paradox of
          > our system of parliamentary democratic representation. (That is they get us
          > to give them the power to tell us what to do and how to live. And we really
          > do have the choice, collectively, as we show when we vote for a change of
          > government.)
          >
          > In looking at how power is exercised through language, we should be able
          > to refer to real examples we have found, and explain these texts. But we
          > should also have a theoretical approach that will enable us to interpret
          > language data we are presented with in an examination. Among other things,
          > we should look at pragmatics and speech act theory, lexis and semantics
          > (forms and meanings), forms that include or exclude (insiders or
          > outsiders), structures (at phrase, clause and discourse level), forms of
          > address, phatic tokens, as well as structural features of speech, which may
          > be used to exercise or establish power. And in some contexts, we will need
          > to be able to show how rhetorical devices are used to influence an audience
          > .
          >
          > Consider, for example, how conversational maxims may be adapted for
          > reasons of expedience, rather than integrity. Does all power corrupt in
          > language, as it does generally?
          >
          > LUWID,
          >
          > Marc
          >
          > ----------------------------------------------------------
          >
          > From: Carol Guanzon
          > Sent: Sunday, January 06, 2013 1:57 PM
          > To: Marc M. Mangalindan
          > Subject: Re: Masaplalang Bayung Banua 2013
          >
          > Cang Marc Mangalindan,
          > Tutu pu ing sinulat yu, Balamu macabusal qng pamanialba queng quecatamung
          > Cultura at Amanu dacal a "power play" acaquit tamu. Masaquit pung calisan
          > ing
          > "power play" qng nanumang catatagan o capagnasan, ne pu? Ating mapilan a
          > taung
          > bisang "mag-bida" nucarin man.
          >
          > Mabilis yang linabas in 2012. Dinalusung yang misna carapal. Sana ing 2013
          > magbanayad yang bagya bang canita mas apilasa tamu ing quecatamung paque
          > qng bie at ing nanumang capagnasan a dapat tamung gauan.
          >
          > Cang Marc, dacal a salamat at tinggap ye ing cacung taimtim a
          > "pamangumusta" quecayu.
          > Matula cu abasa que ing quecayung articulu. Malino ya panga-sulat dapot
          > atin ya
          > namang malungcut a catutuan dapat tamung arapan. Ing Tagalog balamu
          > masican ya
          > calauat qng Pampanga. Acaquit cu careng barangay abibisita cu istung
          > mumuli cu
          > Pampanga, Tagalog ing salita da reng queraclan. Macanian man, e tamu dapat
          > pai-sira lub.
          > Lulugud,
          > Atching Carol
          >
          > ----------------------------------------------------------
          > From: Marc M. Mangalindan MarcMangalindan@...>
          > To: Carol Guanzon steelmoxie2@...>
          > Cc: ANASI AmanungSisuan@yahoogroups.com>
          > Sent: Saturday, January 5, 2013 9:24 PM
          > Subject: Re: Masaplalang Bayung Banua 2013
          >
          > Caluguran ming Ca Carol (at careng aliwang capatad queng Amanung Sisuan):
          >
          > Masaplalang Bayung Banua quecayu ampo pa careng caluguran yu queng bie;
          > capagnasan cu ampo ning canacung pamilya a sana ing Banuang 2013 maging
          > progresibu ya quecatamu ngan.
          >
          > Ita sigurung articulu cung �LANGUAGE CONSERVATION� a melimbag queng grupu
          > ta mung DILA iyang abasa yu. nung nucarin asambitla cu carin a �...
          > political decisions on language issues may have a huge impact on
          > preservation or disappearance of linguistic diversity in a society. A
          > language policy can serve as a political instrument, designated either to
          > build an integrated (or assimilated) monolingual society or to promote the
          > co-existence of multi-culturality and multi-linguism what would enrich all
          > engaged parties.�
          >
          > Metung cu careng mamantabe queng capagnasan ta mung asalba ta ya ing
          > quecatamung pacamalang Amanung Sisuan; at sana, micacasundu ta mu ngan at
          > ilaco ing �power play�. Acu pin quetang catataulian cung pasquil queng
          > Facebook: �When the power of love overcomes the love of power, then the
          > world will be at peace.�
          >
          > LUWID,
          >
          > Marc M. Mangalindan
          >
          > ----------------------------------------------------------
          >
          > From: Carol Guanzon
          > Sent: Sunday, January 06, 2013 12:13 PM
          > To: From: Marc M. Mangalindan
          > Subject: Masaplalang Bayung Banua 2013
          >
          > Calugurang Cang Marc Mangalindan
          > Abasa que pu itang sinulat yu tungcul qng "Language...etc..etc..."
          > Sana pu ing pamisaup-saup tamung isalba ing Amanu at Culturang
          > Capampangan e mu paninap. Sana pu ing patacaran ning DepEd 74
          > maging matagumpe.
          >
          > May you and your love ones enjoy the best all through the year.
          >
          > Peace on Earth and Faith and Hope
          > Warm greetings and joy to you
          > May your dreams for 2013
          > And your wishes all come true.
          >
          > Lulugud,
          > Carol Sicat Guanzon
          > Author: LUGUD Poems I and II
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • bankaw_itomon
          Yeah. the popularity and dominance of Latin for example all over the western world was also the instrument to their own demise. Culture is indeed not separable
          Message 4 of 5 , Jan 6, 2013
            Yeah. the popularity and dominance of Latin for example all over the western world was also the instrument to their own demise.

            Culture is indeed not separable from language. Language is the transmission of culture. A part of culture for culture to be relevant. Otherwise there is no culture.

            bangkaw

            --- In DILA@yahoogroups.com, "Marc M. Mangalindan" wrote:
            >
            > Atching Carol,
            >
            > For me, language and culture are NOT fundamentally inseparable. At the most basic level, language is a method of expressing ideas. That is, language is communication; while usually verbal, language can also be visual (via signs and symbols), or semiotics (via hand or body gestures). Culture, on the other hand, is a specific set of ideas, practices, customs and beliefs which make up a functioning society as distinct.
            >
            > A culture must have at least one language, which it uses as a distinct medium of communication to conveys its defining ideas, customs, beliefs, et al., from one member of the culture to another member. Cultures can develop multiple languages, or "borrow" languages from other cultures to use; not all such languages are co-equal in the culture. One of the major defining characteristics of a culture is which language(s) are the primary means of communication in that culture; sociologists and anthropologists draw lines between similar cultures heavily based on the prevalent language usage.
            >
            > Languages, on the other hand, can be developed (or evolve) apart from its originating culture. Certain languages have scope for cross-cultural adaptations and communication, and may not actually be part of any culture. Additionally, many languages are used by different cultures (that is, the same language can be used in several cultures).
            >
            > Language is heavily influenced by culture - as cultures come up with new ideas, they develop language components to express those ideas. The reverse is also true: the limits of a language can define what is expressible in a culture (that is, the limits of a language can prevent certain concepts from being part of a culture).
            >
            > Finally, languages are not solely defined by their developing culture(s) - most modern languages are amalgamations of other prior and current languages. That is, most languages borrow words and phrases ("loan words") from other existing languages to describe new ideas and concept. In fact, in the modern very-connected world, once one language manufactures a new word to describe something, there is a very strong tendency for other languages to "steal" that word directly, rather than manufacture a unique one itself. The English language is a stellar example of a "thief" language - by some accounts, over 60% of the English language is of foreign origin (i.e. those words were originally imported from another language). Conversely, English is currently the world's largest "donor" language, with vast quantities of English words being imported directly into virtually all other languages.
            >
            > Marc
            >
            > --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
            >
            > From: Carol Guanzon
            > Sent: Sunday, January 06, 2013 4:20 PM
            > To: Marc M. Mangalindan
            > Subject: Re: Masaplalang Bayung Banua 2013
            >
            > Cang Marc ,
            >
            > Cabilis mung misip at sumulat. Mecatatlung besis que binasa ing Language and Power a sinulat mung agad agad. Nung maliari sana, dinan mu cung adua-atlung aldo bang canita lubus queng aisip ing calamnan ning sinulat mu. Macanian man, ing prumeru mung paragraph malaman ya catutuan.
            >
            > "One obvious feature of how language operates in social interactions is its relationship with power, both influential and instrumental. Neither rule nor law, neither discipline nor hierarchy sanctions influential power. It inclines us or makes us want to behave in certain ways or adopt opinions or attitudes, without obvious force. It operates in such social phenomena as advertising, culture and the media."
            >
            >
            > I am straddling between two thoughts regarding saving a language. Is it the language? Or, is it the culture sandwiched in the language that sneaks into the psyche and finds an outlet in the expression of the language?Culture and language are so tightly meshed together, only a hair divdes a clear distinction between them.
            >
            > This fact is a big concern of mine. Can we save a language without first saving a culture? I am very aware that all linguistic speech forms sneak into one's acquired native langauge. But does linguistic expression the standard trademark of that language without the cultural soul locked into it? Example, I studied Japanese for 5 years. I can speak learned Japanese according to the rules I studied. But do I really speak Japanese without sounding a foreigner? I found out that I needed to dig myself into the culture to sound decent and true.
            >
            > Maybe, I am wrong. Again, only a tiny thread divides the right and wrong. Who is to judge? The native born and grown into that culture and language.
            >
            >
            > Cang Marc, panupaya mu cu rugu. Mipacaba ya ing email cu. Casi, pepa-isip mu cu ruge.
            >
            > Lulugud,
            >
            > Atching Carol
            >
            >
            > Again, thank you for your provative short essay.
            > Lulugud,
            > Atching Carol
            >
            >
            > --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
            > From: Marc M. Mangalindan
            > To: Carol Guanzon
            > Cc: ANASI ; DILA
            > Sent: Saturday, January 5, 2013 11:18 PM
            > Subject: Re: Masaplalang Bayung Banua 2013
            >
            >
            > Atching Carol,
            >
            > Angga’t e milaco ing casaquiman o ing panga-materalista ning tau, alang catajimican queti qng yatu; nanupata, talagang masaquit yang calisan ing “power play” â€" uling buri na ning metung at metung “carela” o “quecatamu”, iya ing “bida” queng nanumang catatagan o capagnasan.
            >
            > Macanyan man, mamasa ta mung sana misan a aldo migising ta mu, o caya deng anac da reng anac ta mu, at ing quegana-gana salese ngan.
            >
            > Dacal a salamat, Atching Carol; pauli ning quecatang talamitam ngening aldo a iti, asulat cu ne naman ining macatuquing articulu.
            >
            > LANGUAGE AND POWER
            > (By Marciano M. Mangalindan, 06 January 2013)
            > One obvious feature of how language operates in social interactions is its relationship with power, both influential and instrumental. Neither rule nor law, neither discipline nor hierarchy sanctions influential power. It inclines us or makes us want to behave in certain ways or adopt opinions or attitudes, without obvious force. It operates in such social phenomena as advertising, culture and the media. (Strictly, we are not coerced into buying what the advertiser shows us, nor will we suffer any penalty for our "sales resistance".) Instrumental power is explicit power of the sort imposed by the state, by its laws and conventions or by the organizations for which we work. It operates in business, education and various kinds of management. (In many, but not in all cases, if we resist instrumental power, we will be subject to some penalty or in trouble.)
            > In some spheres of social activity, such as politics or law, both kinds of power may be present at the same time:
            > a.. we are subject to laws (enforced by penalties), but
            > b.. some legal processes, such as trial by jury, rely on attempts to persuade.
            > Politicians impose laws, taxes, and bureaucratic systems (instrumental power) but seek to influence us to endorse their policies or turn out to vote for them (influential power). They may wish to influence us to use our collective power to return them to office, where they will use their executive power to direct some aspects of our lives - a curious paradox of our system of parliamentary democratic representation. (That is they get us to give them the power to tell us what to do and how to live. And we really do have the choice, collectively, as we show when we vote for a change of government.)
            > In looking at how power is exercised through language, we should be able to refer to real examples we have found, and explain these texts. But we should also have a theoretical approach that will enable us to interpret language data we are presented with in an examination. Among other things, we should look at pragmatics and speech act theory, lexis and semantics (forms and meanings), forms that include or exclude (insiders or outsiders), structures (at phrase, clause and discourse level), forms of address, phatic tokens, as well as structural features of speech, which may be used to exercise or establish power. And in some contexts, we will need to be able to show how rhetorical devices are used to influence an audience .
            > Consider, for example, how conversational maxims may be adapted for reasons of expedience, rather than integrity. Does all power corrupt in language, as it does generally?
            >
            > LUWID,
            >
            > Marc
            >
            > --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
            >
            > From: Carol Guanzon
            > Sent: Sunday, January 06, 2013 1:57 PM
            > To: Marc M. Mangalindan
            > Subject: Re: Masaplalang Bayung Banua 2013
            >
            > Cang Marc Mangalindan,
            > Tutu pu ing sinulat yu, Balamu macabusal qng pamanialba queng quecatamung
            > Cultura at Amanu dacal a "power play" acaquit tamu. Masaquit pung calisan ing
            > "power play" qng nanumang catatagan o capagnasan, ne pu? Ating mapilan a taung
            > bisang "mag-bida" nucarin man.
            >
            > Mabilis yang linabas in 2012. Dinalusung yang misna carapal. Sana ing 2013
            > magbanayad yang bagya bang canita mas apilasa tamu ing quecatamung paque
            > qng bie at ing nanumang capagnasan a dapat tamung gauan.
            >
            > Cang Marc, dacal a salamat at tinggap ye ing cacung taimtim a "pamangumusta" quecayu.
            > Matula cu abasa que ing quecayung articulu. Malino ya panga-sulat dapot atin ya
            > namang malungcut a catutuan dapat tamung arapan. Ing Tagalog balamu masican ya
            > calauat qng Pampanga. Acaquit cu careng barangay abibisita cu istung mumuli cu
            > Pampanga, Tagalog ing salita da reng queraclan. Macanian man, e tamu dapat pai-sira lub.
            > Lulugud,
            > Atching Carol
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
            > From: Marc M. Mangalindan
            > To: Carol Guanzon
            > Cc: ANASI
            > Sent: Saturday, January 5, 2013 9:24 PM
            > Subject: Re: Masaplalang Bayung Banua 2013
            >
            >
            > Caluguran ming Ca Carol (at careng aliwang capatad queng Amanung Sisuan):
            >
            > Masaplalang Bayung Banua quecayu ampo pa careng caluguran yu queng bie; capagnasan cu ampo ning canacung pamilya a sana ing Banuang 2013 maging progresibu ya quecatamu ngan.
            >
            > Ita sigurung articulu cung “LANGUAGE CONSERVATION” a melimbag queng grupu ta mung DILA iyang abasa yu. nung nucarin asambitla cu carin a “... political decisions on language issues may have a huge impact on preservation or disappearance of linguistic diversity in a society. A language policy can serve as a political instrument, designated either to build an integrated (or assimilated) monolingual society or to promote the co-existence of multi-culturality and multi-linguism what would enrich all engaged parties.”
            >
            > Metung cu careng mamantabe queng capagnasan ta mung asalba ta ya ing quecatamung pacamalang Amanung Sisuan; at sana, micacasundu ta mu ngan at ilaco ing “power play”. Acu pin quetang catataulian cung pasquil queng Facebook: “When the power of love overcomes the love of power, then the world will be at peace.”
            >
            > LUWID,
            >
            > Marc M. Mangalindan
            >
            >
            > --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
            >
            > From: Carol Guanzon
            > Sent: Sunday, January 06, 2013 12:13 PM
            > To: From: Marc M. Mangalindan
            > Subject: Masaplalang Bayung Banua 2013
            >
            > Calugurang Cang Marc Mangalindan
            > Abasa que pu itang sinulat yu tungcul qng "Language...etc..etc..."
            > Sana pu ing pamisaup-saup tamung isalba ing Amanu at Culturang
            > Capampangan e mu paninap. Sana pu ing patacaran ning DepEd 74
            > maging matagumpe.
            >
            > May you and your love ones enjoy the best all through the year.
            >
            > Peace on Earth and Faith and Hope
            > Warm greetings and joy to you
            > May your dreams for 2013
            > And your wishes all come true.
            >
            > Lulugud,
            > Carol Sicat Guanzon
            > Author: LUGUD Poems I and II
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
          • dphilfinc
            ... Only the authentic culture of the Pampanga region can host the authentic language of CabalErn. Elsewhere, if the language of the Cebuano people is going to
            Message 5 of 5 , Jan 6, 2013
              > Can we save a language without first saving a culture?


              Only the authentic culture of the Pampanga region can host the authentic language of CabalErn. Elsewhere, if the language of the Cebuano people is going to be replaced by a synthetic version influenced by a "thief" language like Tagalog Filipino, what we would be looking at is a different culture in an area occupied by the former Cebuano people. Manny said as much before that if the people of Cebu, etc. stopped speaking Cebuano, they are no longer a Cebuano people.

              In the former Yugoslavia, the Bosnians, Croats and Serbs spoke the same language for centuries. Tito kept them together with iron rule and balanced treatment. When one moved to forcibly assert its superiority over the others, their three cultures broke up for good. When I call them Tagalog supremacists, it is for them to see what beasts they have turned into.

              Benjie
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