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Re: [DILA] Digest Number 3242

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  • Manuel Faelnar
    Bankaw, That was personal & uncalled for. There was a language advocate whi stoppred oosting becayse peoople got persinal. We ni longer have tthe benefit of
    Message 1 of 2 , Dec 7, 2010
      Bankaw, That was personal & uncalled for. There was a language
      advocate whi stoppred oosting becayse peoople got persinal. We ni
      longer have tthe benefit of his insights. Tumbaga gave flesh to your
      "Tagalog is a business". But whatever Tumbaga says you contradict. It
      shiws you dint kike him'or his ideas. Many of us know the need for a
      Cebuano-language nationwide television network. We also know that
      unless we have a Cebuano Bill Gates, this will remain a pipe dream.
      Why, even that most nationally wide-spread Cebuano-owned pawn shop has
      its signage & tarpaulins in Tagalog. Of course one if the brothers now
      lives in Manila his kids speak Tagalog.in the near future, say 6
      years, charter change is aksoa pipe dream. On a daily basis we have to
      resort to guerrilla tactics like what Jesselito, Firth, Ernie, Benjie,
      the Akademiyang Bisaya are doing, at least for now,

      On 12/7/10, DILA@yahoogroups.com <DILA@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
      > United non-Tagalogs
      > Messages In This Digest (10 Messages)
      > 1.
      > When the media become the bad news and a national problem From: Manuel
      > Faelnar
      > 2a.
      > [The DILFED Forum] Reactions: When the media become the bad news and From:
      > Manuel Faelnar
      > 2b.
      > Re: [The DILFED Forum] Reactions: When the media become the bad news From:
      > bankaw_itomon
      > 2c.
      > Re: When the media become the bad news and a national problem From:
      > dphilfinc
      > 2d.
      > Re: When the media become the bad news and a national problem From: Firth
      > McEachern
      > 2e.
      > Re: When the media become the bad news and a national problem From:
      > jesselito Baring
      > 2f.
      > Re: When the media become the bad news and a national problem From:
      > dphilfinc
      > 3.
      > Basketball, football and Charter Reform From: Manuel Faelnar
      > 4a.
      > Reactions: When the media become the bad news From: Manuel Faelnar
      > 4b.
      > Re: better media? From: dphilfinc
      > View All Topics | Create New Topic
      > Messages
      > 1.
      > When the media become the bad news and a national problem
      > Posted by: "Manuel Faelnar" manuelfaelnar@...   manuelfaelnar
      > Mon Dec 6, 2010 7:52 am (PST)
      >
      >
      > A friend who for the moment shall remain unidentified has astutely pointed
      > out that we have been focusing on the wrong enemy. The organization of
      > academics and writers we have been so concerned about turns out to be a
      > paper tiger.
      >
      > The real enemy of our indigenous languages are the big three national
      > television networks with their downgrading and marginalizing our non-Tagalog
      > languages. They are killing our languages every day with their idiotic
      > programs geared for the masa but which, unfortunately, which have no
      > redeeming social or cuiltuiral value.
      >
      > Sharing with you Willie Esposo's article that the TV networks are a problem
      > with their clout and viewership.
      >
      > Of course Esposo's slant is different but many points he raises are valid
      > for our language advocacy.,
      >
      > How do we tackle the television networks who are the real and very powerful,
      > very influential enemies of our languages? Let us put our collective
      > thoughts together.
      >
      > Manny
      >
      > Opinion
      > READ OTHER
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      > READER COMMENT *robotwatch* wrote:
      >
      > " Your comment will be posted after it is approved." <-- irony and hypocrisy
      > in William Esposo's "Post Comment" section
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      > [image: No photo] When the media become the bad news and a national
      > problem
      > AS I WRECK THIS CHAIR By William M.
      > Esposo<http://www.philstar.com/ArticleListByAuthorName.aspx?AuthorName=William+M.+Esposo>
      > (The
      > Philippine Star) Updated December 05, 2010 12:00 AM Comments
      > (13)<http://www.philstar.com/Article.aspx?articleId=636288&publicationSubCategoryId=64#comments>
      > [image:
      > View
      > comments]<http://www.philstar.com/Article.aspx?articleId=636288&publicationSubCategoryId=64#comments>
      >
      > Philippine media, especially television, will have to account for the big
      > Information Gap in our country. Media are the principal means for acquiring
      > information and a look at those top rating television shows will show that
      > more emphasis is placed on what the Filipinos want rather than on what they
      > need to know.
      >
      > Notice the undue attention the two top TV newscasts allot on showbiz gossip
      > and trivia while totally ignoring the major aspects of international and
      > Philippine events that seriously affect Filipino lives. Notice the lopsided
      > attention bad news are given compared to good news that could improve
      > Filipino lives. Notice how news about conflicts and divisions are preferred
      > over news stories that promote unity and caring. Itís stupid really because
      > if this country disintegrates due to unhealed and sharpened animosities,
      > then Philippine media disintegrate too.
      >
      > Notice the programming profile of the top three TV networks, *ABS-CBN*, *GMA
      > Network* and *ABC*, and how entertainment shows dominate the daily program
      > schedules. In a country like ours with a serious Information Gap, that could
      > be considered irrelevant programming. Marketing considerations were allowed
      > to overrule the dictates of public service - unacceptable when you consider
      > that these TV networks were awarded their respective franchises by the
      > government to operate on the condition that they will provide public
      > service.
      >
      > The wrong orientation of Philippine television is rooted to our embracing
      > the American model of programming when we should have adopted the British
      > BBC model where newscasts and documentaries are the main staple. There are
      > channels where informative programs and documentaries are presented but
      > these are on Cable Television which the masses cannot afford to access. The
      > Free TV television programming here gives you the impression that public
      > service (news, information, documentaries, coverage of important public
      > events) is merely the icing on the cake while the entertainment and all the
      > revenues these shows deliver is the cake.
      >
      > We do not wish to single out television but a review of most broadsheets and
      > radio programs nationwide will not reflect a lopsided entertainment versus
      > substance ratio as what prevails on television. Of the tri-media,
      > print-TV-radio, television enjoys the biggest following and therefore a
      > commensurate share of addressing the Information Gap should be shouldered by
      > television. The readership of the highest circulating daily and the highest
      > rating radio program cannot approximate the audience reached by the top 10
      > TV programs.
      >
      > That is only the quantitative aspects of tri-media. In terms of impact and
      > effective net impression, television ó with its sight and sound capability ó
      > is also the most remembered and delivers the highest message recall. That is
      > the reason why television attracts the biggest share of ad revenues even
      > during the time when its reach could only go as far as 20 percent
      > nationwide.
      >
      > That is also the reason why television is the primary mass communications
      > tool for national political campaigns. A candidate for Senator, Vice
      > President and President cannot run a viable national campaign sans
      > television. Local and district candidates can win with only the use of print
      > and local radio.
      >
      > It is not just the tendency of media to air or publish negative news stories
      > that must be questioned. In a country like ours where a lot of things are
      > not done right, media cannot pretend that everything is hunky-dory and just
      > praise the government. We once had a media situation where fantasia and
      > fiction became the main staple. This was during the period of martial law
      > from September 22, 1972 to February 24, 1986 when the government television
      > station was liberated. We should not allow that to happen again.
      >
      > More than the bias for preferring negative stories, it is the poor judgment
      > in selecting content that addresses the most important needs of the Filipino
      > public where our media are found very much wanting. Responsible media should
      > communicate what their audience or readers need and not simply what they
      > want. Cater to what most Filipinos want and media content will be 90 percent
      > showbiz, celebrity and crime stories.
      >
      > A good case in point of a very important issue that is rarely discussed in
      > our media is the developing US-China conflict. In this conflict, Filipinos
      > could find themselves like ants in the middle of two clashing angry
      > behemoths. In many countries, this US-China developing conflict is front
      > page news but over here it is mostly discussed in the foreign or opinion
      > sections. You wonder if media editors here are not touching the story
      > because they are idiots ó people who do not know the truth ó or are simply
      > afraid to touch the subject matter because they are intimidated by their
      > lack of knowledge of it.
      >
      > Another important issue that is hardly touched by media here is the real US
      > agenda in Mindanao. How come no editor ever asked their correspondents to
      > investigate why no Americans have been attacked by the Muslim rebels and
      > terrorists in Mindanao when theyíre all over the areas where there are
      > conflicts? How come our media never probed why our Muslims look to the
      > Americans as their sponsors when the Muslims in the Middle East see them as
      > conquistadores in Iraq and Afghanistan?
      >
      > A gnawing issue that also hounds Philippine media is the ownership
      > structures of most media companies here - specifically those media companies
      > that are linked to political interests. Television and radio should have
      > been isolated from such compromised situations. However, instead of
      > protecting public interest, the system of broadcast franchising also became
      > a tool for political patronage. Try applying for a broadcast franchise if
      > youíre not well connected.
      >
      > Media should be protecting the public from the long arm of the oligarchy
      > that dominates political and economic power here. However, that will not
      > happen when a media company is also owned by oligarchs or businessmen who
      > are aligned with them. Under such a situation public service will certainly
      > give way to self service.
      >
      > --
      > "Anything is possible when you put your mind to it...
      > Believe the unbelievable.
      > Dream the impossible.
      > Never take 'No' for an answer!"
      > Dato' Sri Tony Fernandes, CEO, Air Asia
      >
      > "Without our language, we have no culture, we have no identity, we are
      > nothing."
      > Ornolfor Thorsson, adviser to President of Iceland.
      >
      > "When you lose a language you lose a culture, intellectual wealth, a work of
      > art."
      > Kenneth Hale, who taught linguistics at MIT.
      >
      > "Words, if powerful enough, can transport people into a journey,
      > real or imagined, that either creates
      > a fantasy or confirms reality."
      > Rachelle Arlin Credo, poet and
      > writer.
      >
      > .
      > Back to top
      > Reply to sender | Reply to group | Reply via web post
      > Messages in this topic (1)
      > 2a.
      > [The DILFED Forum] Reactions: When the media become the bad news and
      > Posted by: "Manuel Faelnar" manuelfaelnar@...   manuelfaelnar
      > Mon Dec 6, 2010 1:09 pm (PST)
      >
      >
      > ---------- Forwarded message ----------
      > From: Copper Sturgeon <isdang_tumbaga@...>
      > Date: Tue, Dec 7, 2010 at 2:41 AM
      > Subject: Re: [The DILFED Forum] Re: When the media become the bad news and a
      > national problem
      > To: DILFED@yahoogroups.com
      >
      > To fight the media, one has to prove that there is a greater audience using
      > local languages.
      > The media is business and they couldn't care less about linguistic issues.
      >
      > Jason Laxamana took this to heart and creates media in his mother tongue not
      > just to promote usage, but also to show that local language use is
      > profitable.
      >
      > His latest movie showed it can be done, having the biggest audience during
      > the film festival by Cinema One.
      >
      > To fight the media is not simple since the issue for them is complex.
      > For you who speaks a language other than Tagalog the solution is also not so
      > simple:
      > 1. You have to be the MEDIA.
      > 2. Produce only in the Mother tongue.
      > 3. Popularize them by having contests in all related media venues.
      > a. Rock concerts.
      > b. Movies
      > c. Print and internet.
      >
      > I remembered one conversation I had with a German speaker through e-mails
      > where she said that German rock-and-roll bands do not sing in German because
      > the language does not lend well to it.
      >
      > That created a generation who cannot speak German properly and English
      > becoming more popular since all their favorites songs are in English, and
      > this tend to make English the "Prestige language". English replacing high
      > German among the youth.
      >
      > The German government created a rock contest, and using only German is the
      > only rule...
      >
      > I saw the result of that contest while in Germany and I am impressed at the
      > result.
      >
      > So, your MEDIA targets the youth, always, this was the American educator's
      > target when they installed their systematic destruction of Filipino zeal,
      > and self-confidence as a people.
      >
      > This is also your target. Always, the next generation will determine the
      > direction of the future, from now on, disregard old fogies like me. I am
      > done for.
      >
      > ------------------------------
      > *From:* bankaw_itomon <josepepe9902003@...>
      > *To:* DILFED@yahoogroups.com
      > *Sent:* Mon, December 6, 2010 9:23:22 AM
      > *Subject:* [The DILFED Forum] Re: When the media become the bad news and a
      > national problem
      >
      > tagalog is a business as i have said often enough. how we counter it is
      > change the law that gave it life.
      > Back to top
      > Reply to sender | Reply to group | Reply via web post
      > Messages in this topic (6)
      > 2b.
      > Re: [The DILFED Forum] Reactions: When the media become the bad news
      > Posted by: "bankaw_itomon" josepepe9902003@...   bankaw_itomon
      > Mon Dec 6, 2010 1:52 pm (PST)
      >
      >
      > copper is either naive or just plain ignoring the actuality of the
      > linguistic landscape in the philippines. the health of language is
      > ultimately determined by official policy encouraged by the state and
      > business takes the cue.
      >
      > how can local languages compete with a bigger entity in a media that is
      > national in scope? this is more wishful thinking. no amount of film and
      > literature using the local language can ever compete with the tagalog
      > national language because it is not a level playing field.
      >
      > we can use all the temporary solutions until kingdom come, but the gist of
      > the matter is, until the law says your local language is required with
      > whatever official language there is, nothing that we do that will amount to
      > anything in the long run. it will only make us feel better for a short
      > while.
      >
      > a case that should be studied in reference to local language death is the
      > navajo language. the market place and the popularity of the U.S national
      > language, english, and followed by spanish, because of huge latino
      > immigration, has been instrumental in navajo language's slow demise from
      > disuse even in its own turf.
      >
      > el bancao
      >
      > --- In DILA@yahoogroups.com, Manuel Faelnar <manuelfaelnar@...> wrote:
      >>
      >> ---------- Forwarded message ----------
      >> From: Copper Sturgeon <isdang_tumbaga@...>
      >> Date: Tue, Dec 7, 2010 at 2:41 AM
      >> Subject: Re: [The DILFED Forum] Re: When the media become the bad news and
      >> a
      >> national problem
      >> To: DILFED@yahoogroups.com
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >> To fight the media, one has to prove that there is a greater audience
      >> using
      >> local languages.
      >> The media is business and they couldn't care less about linguistic issues.
      >>
      >> Jason Laxamana took this to heart and creates media in his mother tongue
      >> not
      >> just to promote usage, but also to show that local language use is
      >> profitable.
      >>
      >> His latest movie showed it can be done, having the biggest audience during
      >> the film festival by Cinema One.
      >>
      >> To fight the media is not simple since the issue for them is complex.
      >> For you who speaks a language other than Tagalog the solution is also not
      >> so
      >> simple:
      >> 1. You have to be the MEDIA.
      >> 2. Produce only in the Mother tongue.
      >> 3. Popularize them by having contests in all related media venues.
      >> a. Rock concerts.
      >> b. Movies
      >> c. Print and internet.
      >>
      >> I remembered one conversation I had with a German speaker through e-mails
      >> where she said that German rock-and-roll bands do not sing in German
      >> because
      >> the language does not lend well to it.
      >>
      >> That created a generation who cannot speak German properly and English
      >> becoming more popular since all their favorites songs are in English, and
      >> this tend to make English the "Prestige language". English replacing high
      >> German among the youth.
      >>
      >> The German government created a rock contest, and using only German is the
      >> only rule...
      >>
      >> I saw the result of that contest while in Germany and I am impressed at
      >> the
      >> result.
      >>
      >> So, your MEDIA targets the youth, always, this was the American educator's
      >> target when they installed their systematic destruction of Filipino zeal,
      >> and self-confidence as a people.
      >>
      >> This is also your target. Always, the next generation will determine the
      >> direction of the future, from now on, disregard old fogies like me. I am
      >> done for.
      >>
      >> ------------------------------
      >> *From:* bankaw_itomon <josepepe9902003@...>
      >> *To:* DILFED@yahoogroups.com
      >> *Sent:* Mon, December 6, 2010 9:23:22 AM
      >> *Subject:* [The DILFED Forum] Re: When the media become the bad news and a
      >> national problem
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >> tagalog is a business as i have said often enough. how we counter it is
      >> change the law that gave it life.
      >>
      >
      > Back to top
      > Reply to sender | Reply to group | Reply via web post
      > Messages in this topic (6)
      > 2c.
      > Re: When the media become the bad news and a national problem
      > Posted by: "dphilfinc" bcyp@...   dphilfinc
      > Mon Dec 6, 2010 5:20 pm (PST)
      >
      >
      > --- In DILA@yahoogroups.com, "bankaw" wrote:
      >> copper is either naive or just plain ignoring the actuality of the
      >> linguistic landscape in the philippines. the health of language is
      >> ultimately determined by official policy encouraged by the state and
      >> business takes the cue.
      >
      > There recently was a contest between an independent Cebuano digital movie
      > and a Tagalog-Capampangan one. The first had half the dialog delivered in a
      > state of constipation while the other one had the full blessing of ABS-CBN.
      > Guess which one won?
      >
      > Moving to another setting, there was a fire raging and someone who wanted to
      > be the savior of the scene volunteered that he would put it out by spitting
      > directly on it. The fire did not cooperate and the young man left with his
      > mustache gone. Another jumped right in and peed into the fire. Let's just
      > say that he had no more pubes after that. The third person went around the
      > blaze and saw an arsonist feeding kerosene to the fire. He picked up the
      > biggest stick he could find and whacked the arsonist in the head.
      >
      > It is up to us how we are going to put out the fire consuming our
      > non-Tagalog languages. I can assure you that the participants of the
      > upcoming Cebuano language conference will finish the event with a
      > morale-lifting sense of accomplishment. I am equally certain that nearly all
      > of them will switch on the TV set when they reach home and enjoy their
      > nightly fill of ABS-CBN. Aside from Manny, I do not have the slightest idea
      > who else will not be doing this.
      >
      > Benjie
      >
      > Back to top
      > Reply to sender | Reply to group | Reply via web post
      > Messages in this topic (6)
      > 2d.
      > Re: When the media become the bad news and a national problem
      > Posted by: "Firth McEachern" firth_m@...   firth_m
      > Mon Dec 6, 2010 9:34 pm (PST)
      >
      >
      > I repeat, less talking, more action necessary:
      >
      > Hi DILA,
      >
      > Pardon an unsolicited observation. It has been prompted by reading the same
      > comments recur in a cyclical fashion on this list: perhaps the members of
      > DILA
      > should spend less time despairing about the present language situation and
      > actually do something about it?
      >
      > What DILA needs is an annual action plan with annual objectives that they
      > can
      > reasonably accomplish in that time. You are an organization afterall, not
      > just
      > an email chain, no?
      >
      > Yes, the situation is terrible, and yes, many historical wrongs have been
      > committed, and yes, many people have no clue what these wrongs were and why
      > the
      > present situation does not and should not need to be the way it is. There is
      > a
      > better, brighter alternative future. But it won’t ever be achieved by
      > bangkaw
      > and benjie exchanging the same diatribes all the time.
      >
      > Everyday I notice things that could be fixed, even in small ways. Think
      > small
      > and manageable, a) to build our confidence in being able to see results from
      > our
      > efforts, and b) small steps can lead to bigger steps.
      >
      > For example:
      >
      > I wrote the President of Globe Telecom thanking Globe for using the regional
      > languages in their banner ads. I said it differentiated them from their
      > competitor Smart, made them more relevant and respectful to their local
      > markets,
      > and told him I personally switched phone companies as a result. I also gave
      > him
      > ideas how Globe could further support the regional languages. He responded,
      > personally signed, stating how glad he was that their strategy was paying
      > off
      > and hope to continue the strategy in the future. He also said he would
      > consider
      > supporting DepEd’s initiatives regarding Mother Tongue Based Education
      > through
      > their education advocacy arm in their next allocation of funding.
      >
      > Of course it is not guaranteed anything will be done, but positive
      > reinforcement
      > can be just, if not more powerful than criticism. Perhaps my letter got read
      > and
      > answered because I had a former mayor of San Fernando (Mary Jane Ortega)
      > sign it
      > too. Or perhaps it was its contents, but you could all be writing your own
      > letters if you want. Or more effectively, teaming up to write at least a
      > letter
      > a month and having signed by as many people as possible. A different target
      > should be chosen each month.
      >
      > Possible letter subjects or actions that could be taken in a year’s plan:
      >
      > 1. Contact the ISP / Encleare Foundation, who make the New Webster’s
      > Standard Dictionary “with Philippines 8 Major Dialects and Special
      > Supplements”
      > and the Philippine almanac. It is published every year and sent to many of
      > the
      > nation’s libraries and schools. Tell them that as maker/publisher of
      > academic
      > resources, their incorrect use of the word “dialect” should be corrected
      > so as
      > not to perpetuate this long held misconception that Philippine languages are
      > dialects.
      > 2. Contact DepEd to similarly request them to inform their textbook writers
      > and publishers to correct their materials for their next editions so that
      > they
      > don’t refer to Philippine languages as ‘dialects.’ We can’t afford
      > to have yet
      > another generation of millions of children learning wrong, and frankly
      > disrespectful, information.
      >
      > 3. Contact the KWF and suggest to them, as part of next year’s Filipino
      > Month, to feature other Philippine languages better. Theme to pose to them:
      > music. Ask some Philippine stars to each contribute a song to a CD sung in a
      > different Philippine language. The songs should be modern and hip, either
      > translations of existing English or Tagalog songs, modern versions of old
      > folk
      > songs, or new entirely.
      > 4. Contact Google, Facebook, or other sites and ask them to offer services
      > in at least two other Philippine languages, the largest being Bisaya and
      > Ilokano. Features on offer could be adding these languages to Google’s
      > translation feature, Google’s search tool, and as for facebook, the site
      > itself.
      > Explain to them the idea of offering commercial support to languages that
      > don’t
      > have national recognition or are otherwise politically marginalized –
      > especially
      > for the world’s largest minorities – a being socially transformative.
      > 5. Each person write/translate a new Wikipedia page for a Philippine
      > language each week for a month.
      > 6. Submit 1 opinion piece each month to newspapers about any language topic:
      > benefits of multilingualism, historical facts on Philippine independence and
      > the
      > national language formulation, present situation, comparison to other
      > countries,
      > what we should be doing, success stories in parts of the Philippines or
      > elsewhere, the rotten examples, federalism, what needs to go in the next
      > constitutional revision, etc.
      >
      > 7. Convince someone quite famous, or if your lucky, very famous that you
      > know that could do an action or make a statement that would bring the
      > language
      > issue to the public’s awareness. Imagine the impact it would have if Manny
      > Pacqiao, for example, refused to act in advertisements or speak on
      > television in
      > Tagalog until ABS-CBN and GMA added more regional programming, in regional
      > languages, to their daily broadcast?
      >
      > 8. Contact a wealthier external government entity that is successfully
      > implementing language revitalization measures, such as Catalonia, Basque,
      > Wales,
      > Canada (Nunavut or Quebec), and ask if they have ever thought of creating an
      > outreach arm to share their success stories and methods to other
      > linguistically
      > marginalized provinces/regions of the world. As pioneers and with more
      > resources
      > than most marginalized areas, their technical assistance would be very
      > appreciated.
      > 9. Ask international organizations doing development work in the
      > Philippines, such as USAID, ADB, UN, etc, to be more sensitive to language
      > in
      > their practices. Sustainable development is a universal paradigm now, but if
      > their work overlooks language, which forms a big part of culture, then they
      > threaten to erode cultures. Sustainable development is not just about
      > economic
      > growth, as they know, it include the maintenance of cultural fabrics to the
      > best
      > of their ability. Everything down to choosing what language to make a
      > sanitation
      > pamphlet, for example, should be under the lens of cultural sensitivity. It
      > may
      > be most convenient to print one kind of pamphlet for the whole country, in
      > one
      > language (Tagalog), but such decisions of convenience completely ignore
      > linguistic rights for minorities, etc, which should be enshrined in all
      > development work. Development should never be done in a vacuum of economic
      > numbers, and must be culturally and socially sensitive
      > 10. Compile a list of all education-related NGOs / foundations in the
      > country
      > and send identical letters of info to them informing them of the latest
      > developments regarding MLE in DepEd. You'd be surprised at how little even
      > people and organizations who are close to the educational sector know of a)
      > the
      > benefits of MLE and b) that it is official policy now and actually being
      > implemented.They need to get on board and become mouthpieces themselves.
      > Each of these things activities would be considered a “campaign.” To be
      > honest,
      > this is probably too ambitious for a year, so pick 3 or 4 for 2011 and save
      > the
      > others for 2012, for example.
      > It might be best to arrange all the letters at once, and then when
      > collecting
      > co-signers, just have them sign on to all of them, or as many as they agree
      > to.
      > That way you don’t have to recontact everyone when you want to send new
      > letters
      > out with a different target/theme.
      >
      > Signers could include politicians, media reps (the ones in the regions), and
      > especially academics (cuz they’re often more receptive to such issues).
      > And if
      > you want to include a petition with each letter, then regular people (lots
      > of
      > them) can sign for additional potency. In all cases, downplay the DILA role,
      > as
      > people feel alienated by any group that is particularly bitter or vitriolic,
      > and
      > any "DILA" search on the internet uncovers reams of potentially inflammatory
      > rhetoric. DILA members can plan, draft the letters, and catalyze start the
      > campaigns but at the end of the day it would be more effective if each of
      > the
      > letters seem to be grassroots-lead with well-known people and organizations
      > as
      > the primary authors. So our mission is to find a few people who are amenable
      > to
      > the idea to be lead authors and then help them accrue more signers.
      >
      > Who wants to come up with an action plan for 2011?
      >
      > Cheers,
      > Firth.
      >
      >
      >
      > ________________________________
      > From: dphilfinc <bcyp@...>
      > To: DILA@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Tue, December 7, 2010 9:20:56 AM
      > Subject: [DILA] Re: When the media become the bad news and a national
      > problem
      >
      > --- In DILA@yahoogroups.com, "bankaw" wrote:
      >> copper is either naive or just plain ignoring the actuality of the
      >> linguistic
      >>landscape in the philippines. the health of language is ultimately
      >> determined by
      >>official policy encouraged by the state and business takes the cue.
      >>
      >
      > There recently was a contest between an independent Cebuano digital movie
      > and a
      > Tagalog-Capampangan one. The first had half the dialog delivered in a state
      > of
      > constipation while the other one had the full blessing of ABS-CBN. Guess
      > which
      > one won?
      >
      > Moving to another setting, there was a fire raging and someone who wanted to
      > be
      > the savior of the scene volunteered that he would put it out by spitting
      > directly on it. The fire did not cooperate and the young man left with his
      > mustache gone. Another jumped right in and peed into the fire. Let's just
      > say
      > that he had no more pubes after that. The third person went around the blaze
      > and
      > saw an arsonist feeding kerosene to the fire. He picked up the biggest stick
      > he
      > could find and whacked the arsonist in the head.
      >
      > It is up to us how we are going to put out the fire consuming our
      > non-Tagalog
      > languages. I can assure you that the participants of the upcoming Cebuano
      > language conference will finish the event with a morale-lifting sense of
      > accomplishment. I am equally certain that nearly all of them will switch on
      > the
      > TV set when they reach home and enjoy their nightly fill of ABS-CBN. Aside
      > from
      > Manny, I do not have the slightest idea who else will not be doing this.
      >
      > Benjie
      >
      > Back to top
      > Reply to sender | Reply to group | Reply via web post
      > Messages in this topic (6)
      > 2e.
      > Re: When the media become the bad news and a national problem
      > Posted by: "jesselito Baring" jvbaringcons@...   jvbaringcons
      > Tue Dec 7, 2010 2:12 am (PST)
      >
      >
      > Hi Firth,
      >
      > I totally agree with you on this matter, I myself have done it my own small
      > ways. I am now president of rotary club cebu fuente and during my induction
      > I
      > deliver my speech in Bisaya and make an english translation on the board. My
      > fellow rotarian have appreciated what i have done. I always do things in my
      > ways
      > to bring awareness to our people. We need a lot of awareness and it can be
      > done
      > by actually doing it and become a concrete example to this activity.
      >
      > Jesse
      >
      > ________________________________
      > From: Firth McEachern <firth_m@...>
      > To: DILA@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Tuesday, December 7, 2010 13:34:27
      > Subject: Re: [DILA] Re: When the media become the bad news and a national
      > problem
      >
      > I repeat, less talking, more action necessary:
      >
      > Hi DILA,
      >
      > Pardon an unsolicited observation. It has been prompted by reading the same
      > comments recur in a cyclical fashion on this list: perhaps the members of
      > DILA
      > should spend less time despairing about the present language situation and
      > actually do something about it?
      >
      > What DILA needs is an annual action plan with annual objectives that they
      > can
      > reasonably accomplish in that time. You are an organization afterall, not
      > just
      > an email chain, no?
      >
      > Yes, the situation is terrible, and yes, many historical wrongs have been
      > committed, and yes, many people have no clue what these wrongs were and why
      > the
      > present situation does not and should not need to be the way it is. There is
      > a
      > better, brighter alternative future. But it won’t ever be achieved by
      > bangkaw
      > and benjie exchanging the same diatribes all the time.
      >
      > Everyday I notice things that could be fixed, even in small ways. Think
      > small
      > and manageable, a) to build our confidence in being able to see results from
      > our
      > efforts, and b) small steps can lead to bigger steps.
      >
      > For example:
      >
      > I wrote the President of Globe Telecom thanking Globe for using the regional
      > languages in their banner ads. I said it differentiated them from their
      > competitor Smart, made them more relevant and respectful to their local
      > markets,
      > and told him I personally switched phone companies as a result. I also gave
      > him
      > ideas how Globe could further support the regional languages. He responded,
      > personally signed, stating how glad he was that their strategy was paying
      > off
      > and hope to continue the strategy in the future. He also said he would
      > consider
      > supporting DepEd’s initiatives regarding Mother Tongue Based Education
      > through
      > their education advocacy arm in their next allocation of funding.
      >
      > Of course it is not guaranteed anything will be done, but positive
      > reinforcement
      > can be just, if not more powerful than criticism. Perhaps my letter got read
      > and
      > answered because I had a former mayor of San Fernando (Mary Jane Ortega)
      > sign it
      > too. Or perhaps it was its contents, but you could all be writing your own
      > letters if you want. Or more effectively, teaming up to write at least a
      > letter
      > a month and having signed by as many people as possible. A different target
      > should be chosen each month.
      >
      > Possible letter subjects or actions that could be taken in a year’s plan:
      >
      > 1. Contact the ISP / Encleare Foundation, who make the New Webster’s
      > Standard Dictionary “with Philippines 8 Major Dialects and Special
      > Supplements”
      > and the Philippine almanac. It is published every year and sent to many of
      > the
      > nation’s libraries and schools. Tell them that as maker/publisher of
      > academic
      > resources, their incorrect use of the word “dialect” should be corrected
      > so as
      > not to perpetuate this long held misconception that Philippine languages are
      > dialects.
      > 2. Contact DepEd to similarly request them to inform their textbook writers
      > and publishers to correct their materials for their next editions so that
      > they
      > don’t refer to Philippine languages as ‘dialects.’ We can’t afford
      > to have yet
      > another generation of millions of children learning wrong, and frankly
      > disrespectful, information.
      >
      > 3. Contact the KWF and suggest to them, as part of next year’s Filipino
      > Month, to feature other Philippine languages better. Theme to pose to them:
      > music. Ask some Philippine stars to each contribute a song to a CD sung in a
      > different Philippine language. The songs should be modern and hip, either
      > translations of existing English or Tagalog songs, modern versions of old
      > folk
      > songs, or new entirely.
      > 4. Contact Google, Facebook, or other sites and ask them to offer services
      > in at least two other Philippine languages, the largest being Bisaya and
      > Ilokano. Features on offer could be adding these languages to Google’s
      > translation feature, Google’s search tool, and as for facebook, the site
      > itself.
      > Explain to them the idea of offering commercial support to languages that
      > don’t
      > have national recognition or are otherwise politically marginalized –
      > especially
      > for the world’s largest minorities – a being socially transformative.
      > 5. Each person write/translate a new Wikipedia page for a Philippine
      > language each week for a month.
      > 6. Submit 1 opinion piece each month to newspapers about any language topic:
      > benefits of multilingualism, historical facts on Philippine independence and
      > the
      > national language formulation, present situation, comparison to other
      > countries,
      > what we should be doing, success stories in parts of the Philippines or
      > elsewhere, the rotten examples, federalism, what needs to go in the next
      > constitutional revision, etc.
      >
      > 7. Convince someone quite famous, or if your lucky, very famous that you
      > know that could do an action or make a statement that would bring the
      > language
      > issue to the public’s awareness. Imagine the impact it would have if Manny
      > Pacqiao, for example, refused to act in advertisements or speak on
      > television in
      > Tagalog until ABS-CBN and GMA added more regional programming, in regional
      > languages, to their daily broadcast?
      >
      > 8. Contact a wealthier external government entity that is successfully
      > implementing language revitalization measures, such as Catalonia, Basque,
      > Wales,
      > Canada (Nunavut or Quebec), and ask if they have ever thought of creating an
      > outreach arm to share their success stories and methods to other
      > linguistically
      > marginalized provinces/regions of the world. As pioneers and with more
      > resources
      > than most marginalized areas, their technical assistance would be very
      > appreciated.
      > 9. Ask international organizations doing development work in the
      > Philippines, such as USAID, ADB, UN, etc, to be more sensitive to language
      > in
      > their practices. Sustainable development is a universal paradigm now, but if
      > their work overlooks language, which forms a big part of culture, then they
      > threaten to erode cultures. Sustainable development is not just about
      > economic
      > growth, as they know, it include the maintenance of cultural fabrics to the
      > best
      > of their ability. Everything down to choosing what language to make a
      > sanitation
      > pamphlet, for example, should be under the lens of cultural sensitivity. It
      > may
      > be most convenient to print one kind of pamphlet for the whole country, in
      > one
      > language (Tagalog), but such decisions of convenience completely ignore
      > linguistic rights for minorities, etc, which should be enshrined in all
      > development work. Development should never be done in a vacuum of economic
      > numbers, and must be culturally and socially sensitive
      > 10. Compile a list of all education-related NGOs / foundations in the
      > country
      > and send identical letters of info to them informing them of the latest
      > developments regarding MLE in DepEd. You'd be surprised at how little even
      > people and organizations who are close to the educational sector know of a)
      > the
      > benefits of MLE and b) that it is official policy now and actually being
      > implemented.They need to get on board and become mouthpieces themselves.
      > Each of these things activities would be considered a “campaign.” To be
      > honest,
      > this is probably too ambitious for a year, so pick 3 or 4 for 2011 and save
      > the
      > others for 2012, for example.
      > It might be best to arrange all the letters at once, and then when
      > collecting
      > co-signers, just have them sign on to all of them, or as many as they agree
      > to.
      > That way you don’t have to recontact everyone when you want to send new
      > letters
      > out with a different target/theme.
      >
      > Signers could include politicians, media reps (the ones in the regions), and
      > especially academics (cuz they’re often more receptive to such issues).
      > And if
      > you want to include a petition with each letter, then regular people (lots
      > of
      > them) can sign for additional potency. In all cases, downplay the DILA role,
      > as
      > people feel alienated by any group that is particularly bitter or vitriolic,
      > and
      > any "DILA" search on the internet uncovers reams of potentially inflammatory
      > rhetoric. DILA members can plan, draft the letters, and catalyze start the
      > campaigns but at the end of the day it would be more effective if each of
      > the
      > letters seem to be grassroots-lead with well-known people and organizations
      > as
      > the primary authors. So our mission is to find a few people who are amenable
      > to
      > the idea to be lead authors and then help them accrue more signers.
      >
      > Who wants to come up with an action plan for 2011?
      >
      > Cheers,
      > Firth.
      >
      >
      >
      > ________________________________
      > From: dphilfinc <bcyp@...>
      > To: DILA@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Tue, December 7, 2010 9:20:56 AM
      > Subject: [DILA] Re: When the media become the bad news and a national
      > problem
      >
      > --- In DILA@yahoogroups.com, "bankaw" wrote:
      >> copper is either naive or just plain ignoring the actuality of the
      >> linguistic
      >>landscape in the philippines. the health of language is ultimately
      >> determined by
      >>official policy encouraged by the state and business takes the cue.
      >>
      >
      > There recently was a contest between an independent Cebuano digital movie
      > and a
      > Tagalog-Capampangan one. The first had half the dialog delivered in a state
      > of
      > constipation while the other one had the full blessing of ABS-CBN. Guess
      > which
      > one won?
      >
      > Moving to another setting, there was a fire raging and someone who wanted to
      > be
      > the savior of the scene volunteered that he would put it out by spitting
      > directly on it. The fire did not cooperate and the young man left with his
      > mustache gone. Another jumped right in and peed into the fire. Let's just
      > say
      > that he had no more pubes after that. The third person went around the blaze
      > and
      > saw an arsonist feeding kerosene to the fire. He picked up the biggest stick
      > he
      > could find and whacked the arsonist in the head.
      >
      > It is up to us how we are going to put out the fire consuming our
      > non-Tagalog
      > languages. I can assure you that the participants of the upcoming Cebuano
      > language conference will finish the event with a morale-lifting sense of
      > accomplishment. I am equally certain that nearly all of them will switch on
      > the
      > TV set when they reach home and enjoy their nightly fill of ABS-CBN. Aside
      > from
      > Manny, I do not have the slightest idea who else will not be doing this.
      >
      > Benjie
      >
      > Back to top
      > Reply to sender | Reply to group | Reply via web post
      > Messages in this topic (6)
      > 2f.
      > Re: When the media become the bad news and a national problem
      > Posted by: "dphilfinc" bcyp@...   dphilfinc
      > Tue Dec 7, 2010 5:29 am (PST)
      >
      >
      > --- In DILA@yahoogroups.com, jesselito wrote:
      >> I deliver my speech in Bisaya and make an english translation on the
      >> board.
      >
      > It is not DILA but people like Jesselito that will deliver the solution to
      > the Tagalog problem. Ten years ago I expected DILA to aggregate the numbers
      > that will let it crush the Tagalista enemy but now I am realistic enough to
      > appreciate that our role is to make it clear to all how harmful the Tagalog
      > national language is to us. Nothing can be done at the national level
      > without abolishing the Cory Aquino/Joaquin Bernas constitution first. It is
      > up to the regions that are still interested in not becoming Tagalogs to do
      > the right things.
      >
      > We should learn from each other's actions. The proposed language legislation
      > in the Ilocos, what has or will be its effectiveness? If successful, can we
      > replicate it? As good as personal examples are, what matters are results.
      > Are your children, are your neighbors and friends, are you still viewing the
      > Tagalog programming of ABS-CBN? It is an all or nothing situation we are in.
      > We cannot revive our languages from their near-death state if we are
      > addicted to ABS-CBN at the same time. It does not matter how much health
      > food you consume if you do not give up carcinogenic foodstuff.
      >
      > Benjie
      >
      > Back to top
      > Reply to sender | Reply to group | Reply via web post
      > Messages in this topic (6)
      > 3.
      > Basketball, football and Charter Reform
      > Posted by: "Manuel Faelnar" manuelfaelnar@...   manuelfaelnar
      > Mon Dec 6, 2010 2:03 pm (PST)
      >
      >
      > Neat connection between our failure in basketball and the Presidential
      > system. We borrowed the wrong models. Constitutional reform is the way out.
      >
      > Constitutional reform is also needed to save our native languages.
      >
      > Manny
      >
      > Opinion
      >
      > [image: No photo] Phl stuns Singapore; ....
      > FROM A DISTANCE By Carmen N.
      > Pedrosa<http://www.philstar.com/ArticleListByAuthorName.aspx?AuthorName=Carmen+N.+Pedrosa>
      > (The
      > Philippine Star) Updated December 05, 2010 12:00 AM
      >
      > It may not have merited a front page headline but the story ìPhilippines
      > stuns Singapore in footballî was reported on *ABS-CBN *as sports story. In a
      > blow by blow report it said ìFilipino-British Chris Greatwich struck for the
      > equalizer in injury time as the Philippines rallied to a stunning 1-all draw
      > against fancied Singapore Lions for a rousing start in the Asean Football
      > Federation Suzuki Cup at the My Dinh Stadium in Hanoi, Vietnam Thursday
      > night.
      > The keenly-contested match left the Singaporeans reeling in surprise.î
      >
      > The Lions, 3-time winners of the AFF menís championship, drew first blood
      > through naturalized Serbian striker Alexsandar Duricís header in the 64th
      > minute.
      >
      > But the Filipino booters, unlike in previous outings, refused to fold and
      > kept up the pressure until they were amply rewarded with the tying marker
      > despite Singaporeís early dominance.
      >
      > ìNow they can see that we are no longer pushovers,î said elated team manager
      > Dan Palami. ìBefore the game, people here were talking about how many goals
      > they (Singapore) would score against us. Now everybody is taking notice.î
      >
      > This event is momentous not only in sports. Orion Dumdum, a warrior for
      > constitutional reform should be elated. His first shot was an article on FB
      > *Philippine Progress: Shift in Sports, Shift in System* as the way forward
      > for the Philippines. He makes the connection between our failure in
      > basketball and the presidential system.
      >
      > ìItís a real shame because while Filipinos were glued to the NBA Finals at
      > about the same time that the World Cup was just about starting, one
      > unfortunate fact continues to be ignored by basketball-crazy Filipinos: We
      > are never going to excel in sports that require height.
      >
      > ìUnlike most basketball-loving Filipinos, millions of average-height, barely
      > middle-class, or even impoverished Africans and Latin Americans who play and
      > practice soccer can actually dream of one day playing professionally for
      > local or internationally-famous professional teams such as Manchester United
      > (England), Juventus (Italy), Real Madrid (Spain), or Galatasaray (Turkey) ñ
      > to name a few ñ and live a life of fame and fortune.
      >
      > ìThese are dreams that are feasible as long as whoever plays and practices
      > the sport has the competence, talent, and commitment, because the
      > game-dynamics of soccer simply does not require height. It needs to be said
      > that soccer legend Diego Maradona of Argentina became a soccer superstar
      > with his very Filipino height of 5ft 4.
      >
      > ìIn stark contrast to the meritocratic nature of soccer that does not care
      > much about being born with the genes for height, the fixation that Filipinos
      > have for basketball creates so many shattered dreams,î writes Orion.
      > Back to top
      > Reply to sender | Reply to group | Reply via web post
      > Messages in this topic (1)
      > 4a.
      > Reactions: When the media become the bad news
      > Posted by: "Manuel Faelnar" manuelfaelnar@...   manuelfaelnar
      > Tue Dec 7, 2010 5:31 am (PST)
      >
      >
      > Re: [The DILFED Forum] Reactions: When the media become the bad news
      > <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/visayans/message/79132;_ylc=X3oDMTJycnY4N3N0BF9TAzk3MzU5NzE1BGdycElkAzE0MDIwNDEEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MDQzNzk0BG1zZ0lkAzc5MTMyBHNlYwNkbXNnBHNsawN2bXNnBHN0aW1lAzEyOTE3MjcxNzY->
      > Posted
      > by: "Pastor Isaac" pastor.isaac@...
      > <pastor.isaac@...?Subject=+Re%3A%20%5BThe%20DILFED%20Forum%5D%20Reactions%3A%20When%20the%20media%20become%20the%20bad%20news>
      > isaacpv2
      > <http://profiles.yahoo.com/isaacpv2> Mon Dec 6, 2010 2:58 pm (PST)
      >
      > one point i can agree with. instead of seeking to destroy, provide an
      > alternative, hopefully a better one. produce non-tagalog media that offers
      > better entertainment, education and what have you, and the people will
      > respond.
      >
      > --
      > "Anything is possible when you put your mind to it...
      > Believe the unbelievable.
      > Dream the impossible.
      > Never take 'No' for an answer!"
      > Dato' Sri Tony Fernandes, CEO, Air Asia
      >
      > "Without our language, we have no culture, we have no identity, we are
      > nothing."
      > Ornolfor Thorsson, adviser to President of Iceland.
      >
      > "When you lose a language you lose a culture, intellectual wealth, a work of
      > art."
      > Kenneth Hale, who taught linguistics at MIT.
      >
      > "Words, if powerful enough, can transport people into a journey,
      > real or imagined, that either creates
      > a fantasy or confirms reality."
      > Rachelle Arlin Credo, poet and
      > writer.
      >
      > .
      > Back to top
      > Reply to sender | Reply to group | Reply via web post
      > Messages in this topic (2)
      > 4b.
      > Re: better media?
      > Posted by: "dphilfinc" bcyp@...   dphilfinc
      > Tue Dec 7, 2010 5:51 am (PST)
      >
      >
      >> by: "Pastor Isaac" pastor.isaac@...
      >> one point i can agree with. instead of seeking to destroy, provide an
      >> alternative, hopefully a better one. produce non-tagalog media that offers
      >> better entertainment, education and what have you, and the people will
      >> respond.
      >
      > Pastor, where can we see your action plan for this superior non-Tagalog
      > media? It is bad enough that we are reduced to just this open discussion of
      > the Tagalog problem but we should at least not go about this senselessly. It
      > is not our fault that Tagalog is choking our languages to death. Marcos and
      > Cory created this situation. In the past we never had to worry about
      > teaching Cebuano in school or assuring the prevalence of Cebuano content in
      > media. Our language thrived because there was no artificially induced
      > competition. Your language is not the problem. Tagalog is.
      >
      > Benjie
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      --
      "Anything is possible when you put your mind to it...
      Believe the unbelievable.
      Dream the impossible.
      Never take 'No' for an answer!"
      Dato' Sri Tony Fernandes, CEO, Air Asia

      "Without our language, we have no culture, we have no identity, we are
      nothing."
      Ornolfor Thorsson, adviser to President of Iceland.

      "When you lose a language you lose a culture, intellectual wealth, a
      work of art."
      Kenneth Hale, who taught linguistics at MIT.

      "Words, if powerful enough, can transport people into a journey,
      real or imagined, that either creates
      a fantasy or confirms reality."
      Rachelle Arlin Credo, poet and
      writer.

      .
    • bankaw_itomon
      manny, how is my post uncalled for and personal? i did not contradict tumbaga about tagalog being a business. the gist of my post was to give notice that its
      Message 2 of 2 , Dec 7, 2010
        manny,

        how is my post uncalled for and personal? i did not contradict tumbaga about tagalog being a business. the gist of my post was to give notice that its not enough to see it as a market demand because it isnt.


        bangkaw

        --- In DILA@yahoogroups.com, Manuel Faelnar <manuelfaelnar@...> wrote:
        >
        > Bankaw, That was personal & uncalled for. There was a language
        > advocate whi stoppred oosting becayse peoople got persinal. We ni
        > longer have tthe benefit of his insights. Tumbaga gave flesh to your
        > "Tagalog is a business". But whatever Tumbaga says you contradict. It
        > shiws you dint kike him'or his ideas. Many of us know the need for a
        > Cebuano-language nationwide television network. We also know that
        > unless we have a Cebuano Bill Gates, this will remain a pipe dream.
        > Why, even that most nationally wide-spread Cebuano-owned pawn shop has
        > its signage & tarpaulins in Tagalog. Of course one if the brothers now
        > lives in Manila his kids speak Tagalog.in the near future, say 6
        > years, charter change is aksoa pipe dream. On a daily basis we have to
        > resort to guerrilla tactics like what Jesselito, Firth, Ernie, Benjie,
        > the Akademiyang Bisaya are doing, at least for now,
        >
        > On 12/7/10, DILA@yahoogroups.com <DILA@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
        > > United non-Tagalogs
        > > Messages In This Digest (10 Messages)
        > > 1.
        > > When the media become the bad news and a national problem From: Manuel
        > > Faelnar
        > > 2a.
        > > [The DILFED Forum] Reactions: When the media become the bad news and From:
        > > Manuel Faelnar
        > > 2b.
        > > Re: [The DILFED Forum] Reactions: When the media become the bad news From:
        > > bankaw_itomon
        > > 2c.
        > > Re: When the media become the bad news and a national problem From:
        > > dphilfinc
        > > 2d.
        > > Re: When the media become the bad news and a national problem From: Firth
        > > McEachern
        > > 2e.
        > > Re: When the media become the bad news and a national problem From:
        > > jesselito Baring
        > > 2f.
        > > Re: When the media become the bad news and a national problem From:
        > > dphilfinc
        > > 3.
        > > Basketball, football and Charter Reform From: Manuel Faelnar
        > > 4a.
        > > Reactions: When the media become the bad news From: Manuel Faelnar
        > > 4b.
        > > Re: better media? From: dphilfinc
        > > View All Topics | Create New Topic
        > > Messages
        > > 1.
        > > When the media become the bad news and a national problem
        > > Posted by: "Manuel Faelnar" manuelfaelnar@...   manuelfaelnar
        > > Mon Dec 6, 2010 7:52 am (PST)
        > >
        > >
        > > A friend who for the moment shall remain unidentified has astutely pointed
        > > out that we have been focusing on the wrong enemy. The organization of
        > > academics and writers we have been so concerned about turns out to be a
        > > paper tiger.
        > >
        > > The real enemy of our indigenous languages are the big three national
        > > television networks with their downgrading and marginalizing our non-Tagalog
        > > languages. They are killing our languages every day with their idiotic
        > > programs geared for the masa but which, unfortunately, which have no
        > > redeeming social or cuiltuiral value.
        > >
        > > Sharing with you Willie Esposo's article that the TV networks are a problem
        > > with their clout and viewership.
        > >
        > > Of course Esposo's slant is different but many points he raises are valid
        > > for our language advocacy.,
        > >
        > > How do we tackle the television networks who are the real and very powerful,
        > > very influential enemies of our languages? Let us put our collective
        > > thoughts together.
        > >
        > > Manny
        > >
        > > Opinion
        > > READ OTHER
        > > NEWS<http://www.philstar.com/Article.aspx?articleId=636288&publicationSubCategoryId=64#morenews>
        > >
        > > READER COMMENT *robotwatch* wrote:
        > >
        > > " Your comment will be posted after it is approved." <-- irony and hypocrisy
        > > in William Esposo's "Post Comment" section
        > > Reply<http://www.philstar.com/ArticleFeedback.aspx?articleId=636288&replyTo=1330886>|
        > > Read
        > > Other Posts <http://www.philstar.com/ArticleFeedback.aspx?articleId=636288>
        > >
        > > ARTICLE TOOLS post a
        > > comment<http://www.philstar.com/ArticleFeedback.aspx?articleId=636288>
        > > printer
        > > friendly<http://www.philstar.com/ArticlePrinterFriendly.aspx?articleId=636288>
        > > email
        > > article <http://www.philstar.com/ArticleEmail.aspx?articleId=636288>
        > >
        > > SHARE [image: facebook share]
        > > facebook<http://www.facebook.com/sharer.php?u=http%3a%2f%2fwww.philstar.com%2fArticle.aspx%3farticleId%3d636288%26publicationSubCategoryId%3d64>
        > > [image:
        > > tweeter]
        > > twitter<http://twitter.com/home?status=RT%20@PHILSTAR%20When%20the%20media%20become%20the%20bad%20news%20and%20a%20national%20problem%20http%3a%2f%2fphilstar.com%2fArticle.aspx%3farticleId%3d636288>
        > > [image:
        > > yahoo buzz] yahoo!
        > > buzz<http://buzz.yahoo.com/buzz?publisherurn=philstar&guid=http%3a%2f%2fwww.philstar.com%2fArticle.aspx%3farticleId%3d636288%26publicationSubCategoryId%3d64>
        > > other
        > > social networks <http://www.addthis.com/bookmark.php>
        > >
        > > Advertisements
        > >
        > > Affordable Apartments in
        > > Japan<http://rc.asia.srv.overture.com/d/sr/?xargs=20AKxVSf0l0A2oLLBKA-UBnnpsfqCD0QlygnFuum-uHZ7KvXLqPZo2N0VN7A0hxa0d2Truk19budtXgdW1e6IrwkVmK0f3pNXCWK-yf-87f9fjn0Pr39qKOW9RxIN1QclrfZ9ntwvipW3SwdBl52qMqitfwvZ8AyXwGqGTOTyn5ip_ny0P2ucmRwXfxwu2jHFckKVYGGzbIckcEKJN6L9JCzNJqdwRV9D7LVmAIcya4xJobdHRWf3NX_NZQ9RoORIyAXc8ytJSck8-LIL_PEVD7bU.000000055a1a5ac9>
        > > We offer exclusive well-furnished rooms for your Tokyo trip. Rent now.
        > > (www.sakura-house.com)
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        > > Your One Stop Mahjong Table
        > > Supplier<http://rc.asia.srv.overture.com/d/sr/?xargs=20AKkWdil1pHEjkNsjx_RALtgbmdOeKkoYTgfKjYTI_uCzN5pKuf-auU_vBd1D_ifc3QY0LUcLmD0kjdWSufYMAZif_DCmuddOri7edRH3nKIcs6J7eNDQuaFQQstVogpE19LkbZSBjD4VxacIPj726mkyB56nkfTobiiV7pb6xbbpwPbb37rZj2Gvc3HzcYrnysB1N81j2TgvuHkIgc2uI6gzs8m3D40WSOH7I-G3IHM5gZIegc7CrHU.000000055a1a5ac9>
        > > Folding MJ Table, Rose Wood MJ Table, Solid Wood MJ Table. Click Here.
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        > >
        > > [image: No photo] When the media become the bad news and a national
        > > problem
        > > AS I WRECK THIS CHAIR By William M.
        > > Esposo<http://www.philstar.com/ArticleListByAuthorName.aspx?AuthorName=William+M.+Esposo>
        > > (The
        > > Philippine Star) Updated December 05, 2010 12:00 AM Comments
        > > (13)<http://www.philstar.com/Article.aspx?articleId=636288&publicationSubCategoryId=64#comments>
        > > [image:
        > > View
        > > comments]<http://www.philstar.com/Article.aspx?articleId=636288&publicationSubCategoryId=64#comments>
        > >
        > > Philippine media, especially television, will have to account for the big
        > > Information Gap in our country. Media are the principal means for acquiring
        > > information and a look at those top rating television shows will show that
        > > more emphasis is placed on what the Filipinos want rather than on what they
        > > need to know.
        > >
        > > Notice the undue attention the two top TV newscasts allot on showbiz gossip
        > > and trivia while totally ignoring the major aspects of international and
        > > Philippine events that seriously affect Filipino lives. Notice the lopsided
        > > attention bad news are given compared to good news that could improve
        > > Filipino lives. Notice how news about conflicts and divisions are preferred
        > > over news stories that promote unity and caring. Itís stupid really because
        > > if this country disintegrates due to unhealed and sharpened animosities,
        > > then Philippine media disintegrate too.
        > >
        > > Notice the programming profile of the top three TV networks, *ABS-CBN*, *GMA
        > > Network* and *ABC*, and how entertainment shows dominate the daily program
        > > schedules. In a country like ours with a serious Information Gap, that could
        > > be considered irrelevant programming. Marketing considerations were allowed
        > > to overrule the dictates of public service - unacceptable when you consider
        > > that these TV networks were awarded their respective franchises by the
        > > government to operate on the condition that they will provide public
        > > service.
        > >
        > > The wrong orientation of Philippine television is rooted to our embracing
        > > the American model of programming when we should have adopted the British
        > > BBC model where newscasts and documentaries are the main staple. There are
        > > channels where informative programs and documentaries are presented but
        > > these are on Cable Television which the masses cannot afford to access. The
        > > Free TV television programming here gives you the impression that public
        > > service (news, information, documentaries, coverage of important public
        > > events) is merely the icing on the cake while the entertainment and all the
        > > revenues these shows deliver is the cake.
        > >
        > > We do not wish to single out television but a review of most broadsheets and
        > > radio programs nationwide will not reflect a lopsided entertainment versus
        > > substance ratio as what prevails on television. Of the tri-media,
        > > print-TV-radio, television enjoys the biggest following and therefore a
        > > commensurate share of addressing the Information Gap should be shouldered by
        > > television. The readership of the highest circulating daily and the highest
        > > rating radio program cannot approximate the audience reached by the top 10
        > > TV programs.
        > >
        > > That is only the quantitative aspects of tri-media. In terms of impact and
        > > effective net impression, television ó with its sight and sound capability ó
        > > is also the most remembered and delivers the highest message recall. That is
        > > the reason why television attracts the biggest share of ad revenues even
        > > during the time when its reach could only go as far as 20 percent
        > > nationwide.
        > >
        > > That is also the reason why television is the primary mass communications
        > > tool for national political campaigns. A candidate for Senator, Vice
        > > President and President cannot run a viable national campaign sans
        > > television. Local and district candidates can win with only the use of print
        > > and local radio.
        > >
        > > It is not just the tendency of media to air or publish negative news stories
        > > that must be questioned. In a country like ours where a lot of things are
        > > not done right, media cannot pretend that everything is hunky-dory and just
        > > praise the government. We once had a media situation where fantasia and
        > > fiction became the main staple. This was during the period of martial law
        > > from September 22, 1972 to February 24, 1986 when the government television
        > > station was liberated. We should not allow that to happen again.
        > >
        > > More than the bias for preferring negative stories, it is the poor judgment
        > > in selecting content that addresses the most important needs of the Filipino
        > > public where our media are found very much wanting. Responsible media should
        > > communicate what their audience or readers need and not simply what they
        > > want. Cater to what most Filipinos want and media content will be 90 percent
        > > showbiz, celebrity and crime stories.
        > >
        > > A good case in point of a very important issue that is rarely discussed in
        > > our media is the developing US-China conflict. In this conflict, Filipinos
        > > could find themselves like ants in the middle of two clashing angry
        > > behemoths. In many countries, this US-China developing conflict is front
        > > page news but over here it is mostly discussed in the foreign or opinion
        > > sections. You wonder if media editors here are not touching the story
        > > because they are idiots ó people who do not know the truth ó or are simply
        > > afraid to touch the subject matter because they are intimidated by their
        > > lack of knowledge of it.
        > >
        > > Another important issue that is hardly touched by media here is the real US
        > > agenda in Mindanao. How come no editor ever asked their correspondents to
        > > investigate why no Americans have been attacked by the Muslim rebels and
        > > terrorists in Mindanao when theyíre all over the areas where there are
        > > conflicts? How come our media never probed why our Muslims look to the
        > > Americans as their sponsors when the Muslims in the Middle East see them as
        > > conquistadores in Iraq and Afghanistan?
        > >
        > > A gnawing issue that also hounds Philippine media is the ownership
        > > structures of most media companies here - specifically those media companies
        > > that are linked to political interests. Television and radio should have
        > > been isolated from such compromised situations. However, instead of
        > > protecting public interest, the system of broadcast franchising also became
        > > a tool for political patronage. Try applying for a broadcast franchise if
        > > youíre not well connected.
        > >
        > > Media should be protecting the public from the long arm of the oligarchy
        > > that dominates political and economic power here. However, that will not
        > > happen when a media company is also owned by oligarchs or businessmen who
        > > are aligned with them. Under such a situation public service will certainly
        > > give way to self service.
        > >
        > > --
        > > "Anything is possible when you put your mind to it...
        > > Believe the unbelievable.
        > > Dream the impossible.
        > > Never take 'No' for an answer!"
        > > Dato' Sri Tony Fernandes, CEO, Air Asia
        > >
        > > "Without our language, we have no culture, we have no identity, we are
        > > nothing."
        > > Ornolfor Thorsson, adviser to President of Iceland.
        > >
        > > "When you lose a language you lose a culture, intellectual wealth, a work of
        > > art."
        > > Kenneth Hale, who taught linguistics at MIT.
        > >
        > > "Words, if powerful enough, can transport people into a journey,
        > > real or imagined, that either creates
        > > a fantasy or confirms reality."
        > > Rachelle Arlin Credo, poet and
        > > writer.
        > >
        > > .
        > > Back to top
        > > Reply to sender | Reply to group | Reply via web post
        > > Messages in this topic (1)
        > > 2a.
        > > [The DILFED Forum] Reactions: When the media become the bad news and
        > > Posted by: "Manuel Faelnar" manuelfaelnar@...   manuelfaelnar
        > > Mon Dec 6, 2010 1:09 pm (PST)
        > >
        > >
        > > ---------- Forwarded message ----------
        > > From: Copper Sturgeon <isdang_tumbaga@...>
        > > Date: Tue, Dec 7, 2010 at 2:41 AM
        > > Subject: Re: [The DILFED Forum] Re: When the media become the bad news and a
        > > national problem
        > > To: DILFED@yahoogroups.com
        > >
        > > To fight the media, one has to prove that there is a greater audience using
        > > local languages.
        > > The media is business and they couldn't care less about linguistic issues.
        > >
        > > Jason Laxamana took this to heart and creates media in his mother tongue not
        > > just to promote usage, but also to show that local language use is
        > > profitable.
        > >
        > > His latest movie showed it can be done, having the biggest audience during
        > > the film festival by Cinema One.
        > >
        > > To fight the media is not simple since the issue for them is complex.
        > > For you who speaks a language other than Tagalog the solution is also not so
        > > simple:
        > > 1. You have to be the MEDIA.
        > > 2. Produce only in the Mother tongue.
        > > 3. Popularize them by having contests in all related media venues.
        > > a. Rock concerts.
        > > b. Movies
        > > c. Print and internet.
        > >
        > > I remembered one conversation I had with a German speaker through e-mails
        > > where she said that German rock-and-roll bands do not sing in German because
        > > the language does not lend well to it.
        > >
        > > That created a generation who cannot speak German properly and English
        > > becoming more popular since all their favorites songs are in English, and
        > > this tend to make English the "Prestige language". English replacing high
        > > German among the youth.
        > >
        > > The German government created a rock contest, and using only German is the
        > > only rule...
        > >
        > > I saw the result of that contest while in Germany and I am impressed at the
        > > result.
        > >
        > > So, your MEDIA targets the youth, always, this was the American educator's
        > > target when they installed their systematic destruction of Filipino zeal,
        > > and self-confidence as a people.
        > >
        > > This is also your target. Always, the next generation will determine the
        > > direction of the future, from now on, disregard old fogies like me. I am
        > > done for.
        > >
        > > ------------------------------
        > > *From:* bankaw_itomon <josepepe9902003@...>
        > > *To:* DILFED@yahoogroups.com
        > > *Sent:* Mon, December 6, 2010 9:23:22 AM
        > > *Subject:* [The DILFED Forum] Re: When the media become the bad news and a
        > > national problem
        > >
        > > tagalog is a business as i have said often enough. how we counter it is
        > > change the law that gave it life.
        > > Back to top
        > > Reply to sender | Reply to group | Reply via web post
        > > Messages in this topic (6)
        > > 2b.
        > > Re: [The DILFED Forum] Reactions: When the media become the bad news
        > > Posted by: "bankaw_itomon" josepepe9902003@...   bankaw_itomon
        > > Mon Dec 6, 2010 1:52 pm (PST)
        > >
        > >
        > > copper is either naive or just plain ignoring the actuality of the
        > > linguistic landscape in the philippines. the health of language is
        > > ultimately determined by official policy encouraged by the state and
        > > business takes the cue.
        > >
        > > how can local languages compete with a bigger entity in a media that is
        > > national in scope? this is more wishful thinking. no amount of film and
        > > literature using the local language can ever compete with the tagalog
        > > national language because it is not a level playing field.
        > >
        > > we can use all the temporary solutions until kingdom come, but the gist of
        > > the matter is, until the law says your local language is required with
        > > whatever official language there is, nothing that we do that will amount to
        > > anything in the long run. it will only make us feel better for a short
        > > while.
        > >
        > > a case that should be studied in reference to local language death is the
        > > navajo language. the market place and the popularity of the U.S national
        > > language, english, and followed by spanish, because of huge latino
        > > immigration, has been instrumental in navajo language's slow demise from
        > > disuse even in its own turf.
        > >
        > > el bancao
        > >
        > > --- In DILA@yahoogroups.com, Manuel Faelnar <manuelfaelnar@> wrote:
        > >>
        > >> ---------- Forwarded message ----------
        > >> From: Copper Sturgeon <isdang_tumbaga@>
        > >> Date: Tue, Dec 7, 2010 at 2:41 AM
        > >> Subject: Re: [The DILFED Forum] Re: When the media become the bad news and
        > >> a
        > >> national problem
        > >> To: DILFED@yahoogroups.com
        > >>
        > >>
        > >>
        > >>
        > >> To fight the media, one has to prove that there is a greater audience
        > >> using
        > >> local languages.
        > >> The media is business and they couldn't care less about linguistic issues.
        > >>
        > >> Jason Laxamana took this to heart and creates media in his mother tongue
        > >> not
        > >> just to promote usage, but also to show that local language use is
        > >> profitable.
        > >>
        > >> His latest movie showed it can be done, having the biggest audience during
        > >> the film festival by Cinema One.
        > >>
        > >> To fight the media is not simple since the issue for them is complex.
        > >> For you who speaks a language other than Tagalog the solution is also not
        > >> so
        > >> simple:
        > >> 1. You have to be the MEDIA.
        > >> 2. Produce only in the Mother tongue.
        > >> 3. Popularize them by having contests in all related media venues.
        > >> a. Rock concerts.
        > >> b. Movies
        > >> c. Print and internet.
        > >>
        > >> I remembered one conversation I had with a German speaker through e-mails
        > >> where she said that German rock-and-roll bands do not sing in German
        > >> because
        > >> the language does not lend well to it.
        > >>
        > >> That created a generation who cannot speak German properly and English
        > >> becoming more popular since all their favorites songs are in English, and
        > >> this tend to make English the "Prestige language". English replacing high
        > >> German among the youth.
        > >>
        > >> The German government created a rock contest, and using only German is the
        > >> only rule...
        > >>
        > >> I saw the result of that contest while in Germany and I am impressed at
        > >> the
        > >> result.
        > >>
        > >> So, your MEDIA targets the youth, always, this was the American educator's
        > >> target when they installed their systematic destruction of Filipino zeal,
        > >> and self-confidence as a people.
        > >>
        > >> This is also your target. Always, the next generation will determine the
        > >> direction of the future, from now on, disregard old fogies like me. I am
        > >> done for.
        > >>
        > >> ------------------------------
        > >> *From:* bankaw_itomon <josepepe9902003@>
        > >> *To:* DILFED@yahoogroups.com
        > >> *Sent:* Mon, December 6, 2010 9:23:22 AM
        > >> *Subject:* [The DILFED Forum] Re: When the media become the bad news and a
        > >> national problem
        > >>
        > >>
        > >>
        > >> tagalog is a business as i have said often enough. how we counter it is
        > >> change the law that gave it life.
        > >>
        > >
        > > Back to top
        > > Reply to sender | Reply to group | Reply via web post
        > > Messages in this topic (6)
        > > 2c.
        > > Re: When the media become the bad news and a national problem
        > > Posted by: "dphilfinc" bcyp@...   dphilfinc
        > > Mon Dec 6, 2010 5:20 pm (PST)
        > >
        > >
        > > --- In DILA@yahoogroups.com, "bankaw" wrote:
        > >> copper is either naive or just plain ignoring the actuality of the
        > >> linguistic landscape in the philippines. the health of language is
        > >> ultimately determined by official policy encouraged by the state and
        > >> business takes the cue.
        > >
        > > There recently was a contest between an independent Cebuano digital movie
        > > and a Tagalog-Capampangan one. The first had half the dialog delivered in a
        > > state of constipation while the other one had the full blessing of ABS-CBN.
        > > Guess which one won?
        > >
        > > Moving to another setting, there was a fire raging and someone who wanted to
        > > be the savior of the scene volunteered that he would put it out by spitting
        > > directly on it. The fire did not cooperate and the young man left with his
        > > mustache gone. Another jumped right in and peed into the fire. Let's just
        > > say that he had no more pubes after that. The third person went around the
        > > blaze and saw an arsonist feeding kerosene to the fire. He picked up the
        > > biggest stick he could find and whacked the arsonist in the head.
        > >
        > > It is up to us how we are going to put out the fire consuming our
        > > non-Tagalog languages. I can assure you that the participants of the
        > > upcoming Cebuano language conference will finish the event with a
        > > morale-lifting sense of accomplishment. I am equally certain that nearly all
        > > of them will switch on the TV set when they reach home and enjoy their
        > > nightly fill of ABS-CBN. Aside from Manny, I do not have the slightest idea
        > > who else will not be doing this.
        > >
        > > Benjie
        > >
        > > Back to top
        > > Reply to sender | Reply to group | Reply via web post
        > > Messages in this topic (6)
        > > 2d.
        > > Re: When the media become the bad news and a national problem
        > > Posted by: "Firth McEachern" firth_m@...   firth_m
        > > Mon Dec 6, 2010 9:34 pm (PST)
        > >
        > >
        > > I repeat, less talking, more action necessary:
        > >
        > > Hi DILA,
        > >
        > > Pardon an unsolicited observation. It has been prompted by reading the same
        > > comments recur in a cyclical fashion on this list: perhaps the members of
        > > DILA
        > > should spend less time despairing about the present language situation and
        > > actually do something about it?
        > >
        > > What DILA needs is an annual action plan with annual objectives that they
        > > can
        > > reasonably accomplish in that time. You are an organization afterall, not
        > > just
        > > an email chain, no?
        > >
        > > Yes, the situation is terrible, and yes, many historical wrongs have been
        > > committed, and yes, many people have no clue what these wrongs were and why
        > > the
        > > present situation does not and should not need to be the way it is. There is
        > > a
        > > better, brighter alternative future. But it won’t ever be achieved by
        > > bangkaw
        > > and benjie exchanging the same diatribes all the time.
        > >
        > > Everyday I notice things that could be fixed, even in small ways. Think
        > > small
        > > and manageable, a) to build our confidence in being able to see results from
        > > our
        > > efforts, and b) small steps can lead to bigger steps.
        > >
        > > For example:
        > >
        > > I wrote the President of Globe Telecom thanking Globe for using the regional
        > > languages in their banner ads. I said it differentiated them from their
        > > competitor Smart, made them more relevant and respectful to their local
        > > markets,
        > > and told him I personally switched phone companies as a result. I also gave
        > > him
        > > ideas how Globe could further support the regional languages. He responded,
        > > personally signed, stating how glad he was that their strategy was paying
        > > off
        > > and hope to continue the strategy in the future. He also said he would
        > > consider
        > > supporting DepEd’s initiatives regarding Mother Tongue Based Education
        > > through
        > > their education advocacy arm in their next allocation of funding.
        > >
        > > Of course it is not guaranteed anything will be done, but positive
        > > reinforcement
        > > can be just, if not more powerful than criticism. Perhaps my letter got read
        > > and
        > > answered because I had a former mayor of San Fernando (Mary Jane Ortega)
        > > sign it
        > > too. Or perhaps it was its contents, but you could all be writing your own
        > > letters if you want. Or more effectively, teaming up to write at least a
        > > letter
        > > a month and having signed by as many people as possible. A different target
        > > should be chosen each month.
        > >
        > > Possible letter subjects or actions that could be taken in a year’s plan:
        > >
        > > 1. Contact the ISP / Encleare Foundation, who make the New Webster’s
        > > Standard Dictionary “with Philippines 8 Major Dialects and Special
        > > Supplements”
        > > and the Philippine almanac. It is published every year and sent to many of
        > > the
        > > nation’s libraries and schools. Tell them that as maker/publisher of
        > > academic
        > > resources, their incorrect use of the word “dialect” should be corrected
        > > so as
        > > not to perpetuate this long held misconception that Philippine languages are
        > > dialects.
        > > 2. Contact DepEd to similarly request them to inform their textbook writers
        > > and publishers to correct their materials for their next editions so that
        > > they
        > > don’t refer to Philippine languages as ‘dialects.’ We can’t afford
        > > to have yet
        > > another generation of millions of children learning wrong, and frankly
        > > disrespectful, information.
        > >
        > > 3. Contact the KWF and suggest to them, as part of next year’s Filipino
        > > Month, to feature other Philippine languages better. Theme to pose to them:
        > > music. Ask some Philippine stars to each contribute a song to a CD sung in a
        > > different Philippine language. The songs should be modern and hip, either
        > > translations of existing English or Tagalog songs, modern versions of old
        > > folk
        > > songs, or new entirely.
        > > 4. Contact Google, Facebook, or other sites and ask them to offer services
        > > in at least two other Philippine languages, the largest being Bisaya and
        > > Ilokano. Features on offer could be adding these languages to Google’s
        > > translation feature, Google’s search tool, and as for facebook, the site
        > > itself.
        > > Explain to them the idea of offering commercial support to languages that
        > > don’t
        > > have national recognition or are otherwise politically marginalized –
        > > especially
        > > for the world’s largest minorities – a being socially transformative.
        > > 5. Each person write/translate a new Wikipedia page for a Philippine
        > > language each week for a month.
        > > 6. Submit 1 opinion piece each month to newspapers about any language topic:
        > > benefits of multilingualism, historical facts on Philippine independence and
        > > the
        > > national language formulation, present situation, comparison to other
        > > countries,
        > > what we should be doing, success stories in parts of the Philippines or
        > > elsewhere, the rotten examples, federalism, what needs to go in the next
        > > constitutional revision, etc.
        > >
        > > 7. Convince someone quite famous, or if your lucky, very famous that you
        > > know that could do an action or make a statement that would bring the
        > > language
        > > issue to the public’s awareness. Imagine the impact it would have if Manny
        > > Pacqiao, for example, refused to act in advertisements or speak on
        > > television in
        > > Tagalog until ABS-CBN and GMA added more regional programming, in regional
        > > languages, to their daily broadcast?
        > >
        > > 8. Contact a wealthier external government entity that is successfully
        > > implementing language revitalization measures, such as Catalonia, Basque,
        > > Wales,
        > > Canada (Nunavut or Quebec), and ask if they have ever thought of creating an
        > > outreach arm to share their success stories and methods to other
        > > linguistically
        > > marginalized provinces/regions of the world. As pioneers and with more
        > > resources
        > > than most marginalized areas, their technical assistance would be very
        > > appreciated.
        > > 9. Ask international organizations doing development work in the
        > > Philippines, such as USAID, ADB, UN, etc, to be more sensitive to language
        > > in
        > > their practices. Sustainable development is a universal paradigm now, but if
        > > their work overlooks language, which forms a big part of culture, then they
        > > threaten to erode cultures. Sustainable development is not just about
        > > economic
        > > growth, as they know, it include the maintenance of cultural fabrics to the
        > > best
        > > of their ability. Everything down to choosing what language to make a
        > > sanitation
        > > pamphlet, for example, should be under the lens of cultural sensitivity. It
        > > may
        > > be most convenient to print one kind of pamphlet for the whole country, in
        > > one
        > > language (Tagalog), but such decisions of convenience completely ignore
        > > linguistic rights for minorities, etc, which should be enshrined in all
        > > development work. Development should never be done in a vacuum of economic
        > > numbers, and must be culturally and socially sensitive
        > > 10. Compile a list of all education-related NGOs / foundations in the
        > > country
        > > and send identical letters of info to them informing them of the latest
        > > developments regarding MLE in DepEd. You'd be surprised at how little even
        > > people and organizations who are close to the educational sector know of a)
        > > the
        > > benefits of MLE and b) that it is official policy now and actually being
        > > implemented.They need to get on board and become mouthpieces themselves.
        > > Each of these things activities would be considered a “campaign.” To be
        > > honest,
        > > this is probably too ambitious for a year, so pick 3 or 4 for 2011 and save
        > > the
        > > others for 2012, for example.
        > > It might be best to arrange all the letters at once, and then when
        > > collecting
        > > co-signers, just have them sign on to all of them, or as many as they agree
        > > to.
        > > That way you don’t have to recontact everyone when you want to send new
        > > letters
        > > out with a different target/theme.
        > >
        > > Signers could include politicians, media reps (the ones in the regions), and
        > > especially academics (cuz they’re often more receptive to such issues).
        > > And if
        > > you want to include a petition with each letter, then regular people (lots
        > > of
        > > them) can sign for additional potency. In all cases, downplay the DILA role,
        > > as
        > > people feel alienated by any group that is particularly bitter or vitriolic,
        > > and
        > > any "DILA" search on the internet uncovers reams of potentially inflammatory
        > > rhetoric. DILA members can plan, draft the letters, and catalyze start the
        > > campaigns but at the end of the day it would be more effective if each of
        > > the
        > > letters seem to be grassroots-lead with well-known people and organizations
        > > as
        > > the primary authors. So our mission is to find a few people who are amenable
        > > to
        > > the idea to be lead authors and then help them accrue more signers.
        > >
        > > Who wants to come up with an action plan for 2011?
        > >
        > > Cheers,
        > > Firth.
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > ________________________________
        > > From: dphilfinc <bcyp@...>
        > > To: DILA@yahoogroups.com
        > > Sent: Tue, December 7, 2010 9:20:56 AM
        > > Subject: [DILA] Re: When the media become the bad news and a national
        > > problem
        > >
        > > --- In DILA@yahoogroups.com, "bankaw" wrote:
        > >> copper is either naive or just plain ignoring the actuality of the
        > >> linguistic
        > >>landscape in the philippines. the health of language is ultimately
        > >> determined by
        > >>official policy encouraged by the state and business takes the cue.
        > >>
        > >
        > > There recently was a contest between an independent Cebuano digital movie
        > > and a
        > > Tagalog-Capampangan one. The first had half the dialog delivered in a state
        > > of
        > > constipation while the other one had the full blessing of ABS-CBN. Guess
        > > which
        > > one won?
        > >
        > > Moving to another setting, there was a fire raging and someone who wanted to
        > > be
        > > the savior of the scene volunteered that he would put it out by spitting
        > > directly on it. The fire did not cooperate and the young man left with his
        > > mustache gone. Another jumped right in and peed into the fire. Let's just
        > > say
        > > that he had no more pubes after that. The third person went around the blaze
        > > and
        > > saw an arsonist feeding kerosene to the fire. He picked up the biggest stick
        > > he
        > > could find and whacked the arsonist in the head.
        > >
        > > It is up to us how we are going to put out the fire consuming our
        > > non-Tagalog
        > > languages. I can assure you that the participants of the upcoming Cebuano
        > > language conference will finish the event with a morale-lifting sense of
        > > accomplishment. I am equally certain that nearly all of them will switch on
        > > the
        > > TV set when they reach home and enjoy their nightly fill of ABS-CBN. Aside
        > > from
        > > Manny, I do not have the slightest idea who else will not be doing this.
        > >
        > > Benjie
        > >
        > > Back to top
        > > Reply to sender | Reply to group | Reply via web post
        > > Messages in this topic (6)
        > > 2e.
        > > Re: When the media become the bad news and a national problem
        > > Posted by: "jesselito Baring" jvbaringcons@...   jvbaringcons
        > > Tue Dec 7, 2010 2:12 am (PST)
        > >
        > >
        > > Hi Firth,
        > >
        > > I totally agree with you on this matter, I myself have done it my own small
        > > ways. I am now president of rotary club cebu fuente and during my induction
        > > I
        > > deliver my speech in Bisaya and make an english translation on the board. My
        > > fellow rotarian have appreciated what i have done. I always do things in my
        > > ways
        > > to bring awareness to our people. We need a lot of awareness and it can be
        > > done
        > > by actually doing it and become a concrete example to this activity.
        > >
        > > Jesse
        > >
        > > ________________________________
        > > From: Firth McEachern <firth_m@...>
        > > To: DILA@yahoogroups.com
        > > Sent: Tuesday, December 7, 2010 13:34:27
        > > Subject: Re: [DILA] Re: When the media become the bad news and a national
        > > problem
        > >
        > > I repeat, less talking, more action necessary:
        > >
        > > Hi DILA,
        > >
        > > Pardon an unsolicited observation. It has been prompted by reading the same
        > > comments recur in a cyclical fashion on this list: perhaps the members of
        > > DILA
        > > should spend less time despairing about the present language situation and
        > > actually do something about it?
        > >
        > > What DILA needs is an annual action plan with annual objectives that they
        > > can
        > > reasonably accomplish in that time. You are an organization afterall, not
        > > just
        > > an email chain, no?
        > >
        > > Yes, the situation is terrible, and yes, many historical wrongs have been
        > > committed, and yes, many people have no clue what these wrongs were and why
        > > the
        > > present situation does not and should not need to be the way it is. There is
        > > a
        > > better, brighter alternative future. But it won’t ever be achieved by
        > > bangkaw
        > > and benjie exchanging the same diatribes all the time.
        > >
        > > Everyday I notice things that could be fixed, even in small ways. Think
        > > small
        > > and manageable, a) to build our confidence in being able to see results from
        > > our
        > > efforts, and b) small steps can lead to bigger steps.
        > >
        > > For example:
        > >
        > > I wrote the President of Globe Telecom thanking Globe for using the regional
        > > languages in their banner ads. I said it differentiated them from their
        > > competitor Smart, made them more relevant and respectful to their local
        > > markets,
        > > and told him I personally switched phone companies as a result. I also gave
        > > him
        > > ideas how Globe could further support the regional languages. He responded,
        > > personally signed, stating how glad he was that their strategy was paying
        > > off
        > > and hope to continue the strategy in the future. He also said he would
        > > consider
        > > supporting DepEd’s initiatives regarding Mother Tongue Based Education
        > > through
        > > their education advocacy arm in their next allocation of funding.
        > >
        > > Of course it is not guaranteed anything will be done, but positive
        > > reinforcement
        > > can be just, if not more powerful than criticism. Perhaps my letter got read
        > > and
        > > answered because I had a former mayor of San Fernando (Mary Jane Ortega)
        > > sign it
        > > too. Or perhaps it was its contents, but you could all be writing your own
        > > letters if you want. Or more effectively, teaming up to write at least a
        > > letter
        > > a month and having signed by as many people as possible. A different target
        > > should be chosen each month.
        > >
        > > Possible letter subjects or actions that could be taken in a year’s plan:
        > >
        > > 1. Contact the ISP / Encleare Foundation, who make the New Webster’s
        > > Standard Dictionary “with Philippines 8 Major Dialects and Special
        > > Supplements”
        > > and the Philippine almanac. It is published every year and sent to many of
        > > the
        > > nation’s libraries and schools. Tell them that as maker/publisher of
        > > academic
        > > resources, their incorrect use of the word “dialect” should be corrected
        > > so as
        > > not to perpetuate this long held misconception that Philippine languages are
        > > dialects.
        > > 2. Contact DepEd to similarly request them to inform their textbook writers
        > > and publishers to correct their materials for their next editions so that
        > > they
        > > don’t refer to Philippine languages as ‘dialects.’ We can’t afford
        > > to have yet
        > > another generation of millions of children learning wrong, and frankly
        > > disrespectful, information.
        > >
        > > 3. Contact the KWF and suggest to them, as part of next year’s Filipino
        > > Month, to feature other Philippine languages better. Theme to pose to them:
        > > music. Ask some Philippine stars to each contribute a song to a CD sung in a
        > > different Philippine language. The songs should be modern and hip, either
        > > translations of existing English or Tagalog songs, modern versions of old
        > > folk
        > > songs, or new entirely.
        > > 4. Contact Google, Facebook, or other sites and ask them to offer services
        > > in at least two other Philippine languages, the largest being Bisaya and
        > > Ilokano. Features on offer could be adding these languages to Google’s
        > > translation feature, Google’s search tool, and as for facebook, the site
        > > itself.
        > > Explain to them the idea of offering commercial support to languages that
        > > don’t
        > > have national recognition or are otherwise politically marginalized –
        > > especially
        > > for the world’s largest minorities – a being socially transformative.
        > > 5. Each person write/translate a new Wikipedia page for a Philippine
        > > language each week for a month.
        > > 6. Submit 1 opinion piece each month to newspapers about any language topic:
        > > benefits of multilingualism, historical facts on Philippine independence and
        > > the
        > > national language formulation, present situation, comparison to other
        > > countries,
        > > what we should be doing, success stories in parts of the Philippines or
        > > elsewhere, the rotten examples, federalism, what needs to go in the next
        > > constitutional revision, etc.
        > >
        > > 7. Convince someone quite famous, or if your lucky, very famous that you
        > > know that could do an action or make a statement that would bring the
        > > language
        > > issue to the public’s awareness. Imagine the impact it would have if Manny
        > > Pacqiao, for example, refused to act in advertisements or speak on
        > > television in
        > > Tagalog until ABS-CBN and GMA added more regional programming, in regional
        > > languages, to their daily broadcast?
        > >
        > > 8. Contact a wealthier external government entity that is successfully
        > > implementing language revitalization measures, such as Catalonia, Basque,
        > > Wales,
        > > Canada (Nunavut or Quebec), and ask if they have ever thought of creating an
        > > outreach arm to share their success stories and methods to other
        > > linguistically
        > > marginalized provinces/regions of the world. As pioneers and with more
        > > resources
        > > than most marginalized areas, their technical assistance would be very
        > > appreciated.
        > > 9. Ask international organizations doing development work in the
        > > Philippines, such as USAID, ADB, UN, etc, to be more sensitive to language
        > > in
        > > their practices. Sustainable development is a universal paradigm now, but if
        > > their work overlooks language, which forms a big part of culture, then they
        > > threaten to erode cultures. Sustainable development is not just about
        > > economic
        > > growth, as they know, it include the maintenance of cultural fabrics to the
        > > best
        > > of their ability. Everything down to choosing what language to make a
        > > sanitation
        > > pamphlet, for example, should be under the lens of cultural sensitivity. It
        > > may
        > > be most convenient to print one kind of pamphlet for the whole country, in
        > > one
        > > language (Tagalog), but such decisions of convenience completely ignore
        > > linguistic rights for minorities, etc, which should be enshrined in all
        > > development work. Development should never be done in a vacuum of economic
        > > numbers, and must be culturally and socially sensitive
        > > 10. Compile a list of all education-related NGOs / foundations in the
        > > country
        > > and send identical letters of info to them informing them of the latest
        > > developments regarding MLE in DepEd. You'd be surprised at how little even
        > > people and organizations who are close to the educational sector know of a)
        > > the
        > > benefits of MLE and b) that it is official policy now and actually being
        > > implemented.They need to get on board and become mouthpieces themselves.
        > > Each of these things activities would be considered a “campaign.” To be
        > > honest,
        > > this is probably too ambitious for a year, so pick 3 or 4 for 2011 and save
        > > the
        > > others for 2012, for example.
        > > It might be best to arrange all the letters at once, and then when
        > > collecting
        > > co-signers, just have them sign on to all of them, or as many as they agree
        > > to.
        > > That way you don’t have to recontact everyone when you want to send new
        > > letters
        > > out with a different target/theme.
        > >
        > > Signers could include politicians, media reps (the ones in the regions), and
        > > especially academics (cuz they’re often more receptive to such issues).
        > > And if
        > > you want to include a petition with each letter, then regular people (lots
        > > of
        > > them) can sign for additional potency. In all cases, downplay the DILA role,
        > > as
        > > people feel alienated by any group that is particularly bitter or vitriolic,
        > > and
        > > any "DILA" search on the internet uncovers reams of potentially inflammatory
        > > rhetoric. DILA members can plan, draft the letters, and catalyze start the
        > > campaigns but at the end of the day it would be more effective if each of
        > > the
        > > letters seem to be grassroots-lead with well-known people and organizations
        > > as
        > > the primary authors. So our mission is to find a few people who are amenable
        > > to
        > > the idea to be lead authors and then help them accrue more signers.
        > >
        > > Who wants to come up with an action plan for 2011?
        > >
        > > Cheers,
        > > Firth.
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > ________________________________
        > > From: dphilfinc <bcyp@...>
        > > To: DILA@yahoogroups.com
        > > Sent: Tue, December 7, 2010 9:20:56 AM
        > > Subject: [DILA] Re: When the media become the bad news and a national
        > > problem
        > >
        > > --- In DILA@yahoogroups.com, "bankaw" wrote:
        > >> copper is either naive or just plain ignoring the actuality of the
        > >> linguistic
        > >>landscape in the philippines. the health of language is ultimately
        > >> determined by
        > >>official policy encouraged by the state and business takes the cue.
        > >>
        > >
        > > There recently was a contest between an independent Cebuano digital movie
        > > and a
        > > Tagalog-Capampangan one. The first had half the dialog delivered in a state
        > > of
        > > constipation while the other one had the full blessing of ABS-CBN. Guess
        > > which
        > > one won?
        > >
        > > Moving to another setting, there was a fire raging and someone who wanted to
        > > be
        > > the savior of the scene volunteered that he would put it out by spitting
        > > directly on it. The fire did not cooperate and the young man left with his
        > > mustache gone. Another jumped right in and peed into the fire. Let's just
        > > say
        > > that he had no more pubes after that. The third person went around the blaze
        > > and
        > > saw an arsonist feeding kerosene to the fire. He picked up the biggest stick
        > > he
        > > could find and whacked the arsonist in the head.
        > >
        > > It is up to us how we are going to put out the fire consuming our
        > > non-Tagalog
        > > languages. I can assure you that the participants of the upcoming Cebuano
        > > language conference will finish the event with a morale-lifting sense of
        > > accomplishment. I am equally certain that nearly all of them will switch on
        > > the
        > > TV set when they reach home and enjoy their nightly fill of ABS-CBN. Aside
        > > from
        > > Manny, I do not have the slightest idea who else will not be doing this.
        > >
        > > Benjie
        > >
        > > Back to top
        > > Reply to sender | Reply to group | Reply via web post
        > > Messages in this topic (6)
        > > 2f.
        > > Re: When the media become the bad news and a national problem
        > > Posted by: "dphilfinc" bcyp@...   dphilfinc
        > > Tue Dec 7, 2010 5:29 am (PST)
        > >
        > >
        > > --- In DILA@yahoogroups.com, jesselito wrote:
        > >> I deliver my speech in Bisaya and make an english translation on the
        > >> board.
        > >
        > > It is not DILA but people like Jesselito that will deliver the solution to
        > > the Tagalog problem. Ten years ago I expected DILA to aggregate the numbers
        > > that will let it crush the Tagalista enemy but now I am realistic enough to
        > > appreciate that our role is to make it clear to all how harmful the Tagalog
        > > national language is to us. Nothing can be done at the national level
        > > without abolishing the Cory Aquino/Joaquin Bernas constitution first. It is
        > > up to the regions that are still interested in not becoming Tagalogs to do
        > > the right things.
        > >
        > > We should learn from each other's actions. The proposed language legislation
        > > in the Ilocos, what has or will be its effectiveness? If successful, can we
        > > replicate it? As good as personal examples are, what matters are results.
        > > Are your children, are your neighbors and friends, are you still viewing the
        > > Tagalog programming of ABS-CBN? It is an all or nothing situation we are in.
        > > We cannot revive our languages from their near-death state if we are
        > > addicted to ABS-CBN at the same time. It does not matter how much health
        > > food you consume if you do not give up carcinogenic foodstuff.
        > >
        > > Benjie
        > >
        > > Back to top
        > > Reply to sender | Reply to group | Reply via web post
        > > Messages in this topic (6)
        > > 3.
        > > Basketball, football and Charter Reform
        > > Posted by: "Manuel Faelnar" manuelfaelnar@...   manuelfaelnar
        > > Mon Dec 6, 2010 2:03 pm (PST)
        > >
        > >
        > > Neat connection between our failure in basketball and the Presidential
        > > system. We borrowed the wrong models. Constitutional reform is the way out.
        > >
        > > Constitutional reform is also needed to save our native languages.
        > >
        > > Manny
        > >
        > > Opinion
        > >
        > > [image: No photo] Phl stuns Singapore; ....
        > > FROM A DISTANCE By Carmen N.
        > > Pedrosa<http://www.philstar.com/ArticleListByAuthorName.aspx?AuthorName=Carmen+N.+Pedrosa>
        > > (The
        > > Philippine Star) Updated December 05, 2010 12:00 AM
        > >
        > > It may not have merited a front page headline but the story ìPhilippines
        > > stuns Singapore in footballî was reported on *ABS-CBN *as sports story. In a
        > > blow by blow report it said ìFilipino-British Chris Greatwich struck for the
        > > equalizer in injury time as the Philippines rallied to a stunning 1-all draw
        > > against fancied Singapore Lions for a rousing start in the Asean Football
        > > Federation Suzuki Cup at the My Dinh Stadium in Hanoi, Vietnam Thursday
        > > night.
        > > The keenly-contested match left the Singaporeans reeling in surprise.î
        > >
        > > The Lions, 3-time winners of the AFF menís championship, drew first blood
        > > through naturalized Serbian striker Alexsandar Duricís header in the 64th
        > > minute.
        > >
        > > But the Filipino booters, unlike in previous outings, refused to fold and
        > > kept up the pressure until they were amply rewarded with the tying marker
        > > despite Singaporeís early dominance.
        > >
        > > ìNow they can see that we are no longer pushovers,î said elated team manager
        > > Dan Palami. ìBefore the game, people here were talking about how many goals
        > > they (Singapore) would score against us. Now everybody is taking notice.î
        > >
        > > This event is momentous not only in sports. Orion Dumdum, a warrior for
        > > constitutional reform should be elated. His first shot was an article on FB
        > > *Philippine Progress: Shift in Sports, Shift in System* as the way forward
        > > for the Philippines. He makes the connection between our failure in
        > > basketball and the presidential system.
        > >
        > > ìItís a real shame because while Filipinos were glued to the NBA Finals at
        > > about the same time that the World Cup was just about starting, one
        > > unfortunate fact continues to be ignored by basketball-crazy Filipinos: We
        > > are never going to excel in sports that require height.
        > >
        > > ìUnlike most basketball-loving Filipinos, millions of average-height, barely
        > > middle-class, or even impoverished Africans and Latin Americans who play and
        > > practice soccer can actually dream of one day playing professionally for
        > > local or internationally-famous professional teams such as Manchester United
        > > (England), Juventus (Italy), Real Madrid (Spain), or Galatasaray (Turkey) ñ
        > > to name a few ñ and live a life of fame and fortune.
        > >
        > > ìThese are dreams that are feasible as long as whoever plays and practices
        > > the sport has the competence, talent, and commitment, because the
        > > game-dynamics of soccer simply does not require height. It needs to be said
        > > that soccer legend Diego Maradona of Argentina became a soccer superstar
        > > with his very Filipino height of 5ft 4.
        > >
        > > ìIn stark contrast to the meritocratic nature of soccer that does not care
        > > much about being born with the genes for height, the fixation that Filipinos
        > > have for basketball creates so many shattered dreams,î writes Orion.
        > > Back to top
        > > Reply to sender | Reply to group | Reply via web post
        > > Messages in this topic (1)
        > > 4a.
        > > Reactions: When the media become the bad news
        > > Posted by: "Manuel Faelnar" manuelfaelnar@...   manuelfaelnar
        > > Tue Dec 7, 2010 5:31 am (PST)
        > >
        > >
        > > Re: [The DILFED Forum] Reactions: When the media become the bad news
        > > <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/visayans/message/79132;_ylc=X3oDMTJycnY4N3N0BF9TAzk3MzU5NzE1BGdycElkAzE0MDIwNDEEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MDQzNzk0BG1zZ0lkAzc5MTMyBHNlYwNkbXNnBHNsawN2bXNnBHN0aW1lAzEyOTE3MjcxNzY->
        > > Posted
        > > by: "Pastor Isaac" pastor.isaac@...
        > > <pastor.isaac@...?Subject=+Re%3A%20%5BThe%20DILFED%20Forum%5D%20Reactions%3A%20When%20the%20media%20become%20the%20bad%20news>
        > > isaacpv2
        > > <http://profiles.yahoo.com/isaacpv2> Mon Dec 6, 2010 2:58 pm (PST)
        > >
        > > one point i can agree with. instead of seeking to destroy, provide an
        > > alternative, hopefully a better one. produce non-tagalog media that offers
        > > better entertainment, education and what have you, and the people will
        > > respond.
        > >
        > > --
        > > "Anything is possible when you put your mind to it...
        > > Believe the unbelievable.
        > > Dream the impossible.
        > > Never take 'No' for an answer!"
        > > Dato' Sri Tony Fernandes, CEO, Air Asia
        > >
        > > "Without our language, we have no culture, we have no identity, we are
        > > nothing."
        > > Ornolfor Thorsson, adviser to President of Iceland.
        > >
        > > "When you lose a language you lose a culture, intellectual wealth, a work of
        > > art."
        > > Kenneth Hale, who taught linguistics at MIT.
        > >
        > > "Words, if powerful enough, can transport people into a journey,
        > > real or imagined, that either creates
        > > a fantasy or confirms reality."
        > > Rachelle Arlin Credo, poet and
        > > writer.
        > >
        > > .
        > > Back to top
        > > Reply to sender | Reply to group | Reply via web post
        > > Messages in this topic (2)
        > > 4b.
        > > Re: better media?
        > > Posted by: "dphilfinc" bcyp@...   dphilfinc
        > > Tue Dec 7, 2010 5:51 am (PST)
        > >
        > >
        > >> by: "Pastor Isaac" pastor.isaac@
        > >> one point i can agree with. instead of seeking to destroy, provide an
        > >> alternative, hopefully a better one. produce non-tagalog media that offers
        > >> better entertainment, education and what have you, and the people will
        > >> respond.
        > >
        > > Pastor, where can we see your action plan for this superior non-Tagalog
        > > media? It is bad enough that we are reduced to just this open discussion of
        > > the Tagalog problem but we should at least not go about this senselessly. It
        > > is not our fault that Tagalog is choking our languages to death. Marcos and
        > > Cory created this situation. In the past we never had to worry about
        > > teaching Cebuano in school or assuring the prevalence of Cebuano content in
        > > media. Our language thrived because there was no artificially induced
        > > competition. Your language is not the problem. Tagalog is.
        > >
        > > Benjie
        > >
        > > Back to top
        > > Reply to sender | Reply to group | Reply via web post
        > > Messages in this topic (2)
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        > --
        > "Anything is possible when you put your mind to it...
        > Believe the unbelievable.
        > Dream the impossible.
        > Never take 'No' for an answer!"
        > Dato' Sri Tony Fernandes, CEO, Air Asia
        >
        > "Without our language, we have no culture, we have no identity, we are
        > nothing."
        > Ornolfor Thorsson, adviser to President of Iceland.
        >
        > "When you lose a language you lose a culture, intellectual wealth, a
        > work of art."
        > Kenneth Hale, who taught linguistics at MIT.
        >
        > "Words, if powerful enough, can transport people into a journey,
        > real or imagined, that either creates
        > a fantasy or confirms reality."
        > Rachelle Arlin Credo, poet and
        > writer.
        >
        > .
        >
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