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Re: Before Watchmen writer Brian Azzarello | Interview outtakes

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  • Darci
    BTW, if you look at the Spaceman preview, I think Frank Miller has grounds to complain.  His Dark Knight Returns and Dark Knight Strikes Again have been
    Message 1 of 4 , Nov 17, 2012
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      BTW, if you look at the Spaceman preview, I think Frank Miller has grounds to complain.  His "Dark Knight Returns" and "Dark Knight Strikes Again" have been copied a lot, but this is especially egregious.
      :-(
      Darci
      P. S.  I suppose Azzarello and Risso have never read Frank Miller either.  It's just part of the zeitgeist.



      ________________________________
      From: Darci <darci386@...>
      To: "bulletsandbracelets@yahoogroups.com" <bulletsandbracelets@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Saturday, November 17, 2012 2:21 PM
      Subject: Re: [Bullets and Bracelets] Wonder Woman and Before Watchmen writer Brian Azzarello | Interview outtakes


       
      Scott,
      Thanks for finding this at http://www.timeoutchicago.com/things-to-do/chicago-blog/15863746/wonder-woman-and-before-watchmen-writer-brian-azzarello-interview

      I guess we know who we're dealing with here:  Mr. "I don't care what anyone says or what anyone has done before me" Azzarello.  I notice he doesn't mention how Jack Kirby felt about the way DC treated him and his creations.  Very circumspect.  I guess that's a good idea, don't jeopardize a paycheck.

      BTW, Jill Thompson drew Wonder Woman Vol2 #s 45-64 (Aug 1990 - July 1992). George Perez wrote this, through #62, then there was the break for the Wonder Woman Special where William Messner-Loebs took over. 
      Darci

      ________________________________
      From: Scott Vizcarra <francophile50@...>
      To: bulletsandbracelets@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Saturday, November 17, 2012 1:33 PM
      Subject: [Bullets and Bracelets] Wonder Woman and Before Watchmen writer Brian Azzarello | Interview outtakes


      Wonder Woman and Before Watchmen writer Brian Azzarello | Interview outtakes

      Posted in #Chicago blog by Web Behrens on Nov 16, 2012 at 2:12pm

      This exclusive sneak-peek panel of Wonder Woman #15 (on sale December 19), drawn by Cliff Chiang, shows Wonder Woman about to throw down with Orion, one of the New Gods.
      Just before Halloween, we sat down with Chicago scribe Brian Azzarello to talk to him about his big year. His latest collaboration with artist Eduardo Risso—Spaceman, a stand-alone crime story with a sci-fi sheen, set in a dystopian but not-too-distant future Earth—just hit bookstores. Meanwhile, he's writing high-profile but controversial miniseries, Before Watchmen: Rorschach and Before Watchmen: Comedian, not to mention the monthly adventures of a revamped Wonder Woman, one of the biggest critical successes of DC Comics' New 52 initiative.
      We couldn't fit all the details from our hour-long chat in the main article, so here's an edited transcript with highlights of our conversation—along with an exclusive sneak preview of four pages from Wonder Woman #14, on sale November 21, and the prologue to Spaceman.

      SNIP
       
      Regarding Before Watchmen: Were you ready for the controversy about this project?

      I knew it was going to be a shit-storm.

      Some fans get so upset about “what DC has done to Alan Moore” by letting other creators write and draw the Watchmen characters, but to my mind, it’s nowhere near the same thing as what happened to [Superman creators] Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster, or to Jack Kirby under Marvel. And Moore’s spent much of his career reinventing other people’s characters too. I figure, well, I can’t be worried about Alan Moore.

      I can’t be worried about him either. Frankly, if you read his interviews, he says nothing good has come out of comics in the past 20 years, and he hasn’t read comics in the past 20 years. I’m supposed to worry about that guy? No. I can’t. I’m trying to make good comics.

      How long did it take you to decide to sign on?

      It took me talking to [artist] Lee [Bermejo]. That’s all it took. I got a call from Dan. This was prior to Wonder Woman, a few years ago—that’s how long this thing has been percolating. He said, “I’ve got a character I want to offer you.” I was busy, and I said “Dan, I don’t really feel like doing anything more.” He said, “Let me tell you the character.” I said, “Sure.” “Rorschach.” And I said, “You are out of your mind. You can’t do that.” [Laughs.]
      At that point, I didn’t even know he was planning on all the books. But immediately I see—it was Lee. It just made sense. I asked if he had an artist attached, and he said, “No, who do you want to draw?” I said, “Well let’s not even get that far ahead, but it really seems like it would be a project that Lee and I would be pretty good for.”

      At that point had you done Joker with him?

      Yeah. So I called him. I said, “Hey, I got offered something.”

      Something really big.

      “Something really big.” And he said what, and I said Rorschach. He was like, “Fuck yeah, let’s do it.” There was absolutely no hesitation. All the apprehension that I was feeling, he had none of it. So at that point, Lee’s gonna do it, so I better not let anyone else write this thing.

      Are you glad you took it on?

      Let’s wait until the collections come out. It hasn’t been an easy project to work on, editorially, because they have to come out at a certain time, the scheduling. So that’s been difficult. Cracking the nut of the characters has been on the difficult side. And like you said, I have a couple of real dark characters, so my stories are going to be dark. And it’s like, do I want to tell these rotten stories about these rotten people?
      As much as it’s been difficult, it’s been a good time working with these guys. Working with Lee, again, is always great. Working with JG [Jones, the artist on Before Watchmen: Comedian]—this is the first time we’ve worked together, and we’ve always talked about doing something. The response—again, what do I know? People don’t come up to me and say like, “I hate what you’re doing.”

      You didn’t encounter any discussion about it at the New York Comic-Con in October? There was a panel, but nobody stood up and says, “This bugs me”?

      I think we had a question like, “Did you consult with Alan Moore about this?” That was as tough as it got. And the answer is obviously no.

      What about Dave Gibbons?

      Nobody asked me about Dave. I know Dave; I don’t know Alan. And no, I haven’t talked to him either.

      Read the full article with Azzarello here. For a sample of his take on Rorschach, check out four pages here; continue scrolling below for a glimpse at Wonder Woman and Spaceman.                        

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    • Edward Bebee
      ... I m not sure that s totally fair. He does mention Siegel & Shuster. Alan Moore is a different case. Moore can be difficult to deal with and holds extreme
      Message 2 of 4 , Nov 18, 2012
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        Darci sez:
        >I guess we know who we're dealing with here: Mr. "I don't care what anyone says or what anyone has done before me" Azzarello.

        I'm not sure that's totally fair. He does mention Siegel & Shuster.

        Alan Moore is a different case. Moore can be difficult to deal with and holds extreme opinions and grudges. The comics industry -- the companies, fans and press -- have treated him with reverence and kid gloves for decades and in the intervening years he's becomes a bitter old man who spits on everyone in interviews.

        I really like & still buy his work. I used to have a lot of sympathy for his position but it's hard to maintain as he's gone off the rails in recent years.

        He's on record as saying that since his early works, comics have done nothing significant and they will never become "literature".

        However, one only has to read a work like Habibi to know comics already are literature and the medium has left Moore behind.

        And it's not like Moore has respect for other creators like J.M Barrie whose characters he used and went out of his way to avoid paying royalties for.

        None of this justifies DC's or even Marvel's treatment of him but Moore makes it as difficult as possible to take his side of things. If Azzarello has no sympathy, I can't blame him.

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      • Darci
        Ed, I imagine you re actually replying to where I wrote I notice he doesn t mention how Jack Kirby felt about the way DC treated him and his creations.  Very
        Message 3 of 4 , Nov 19, 2012
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          Ed,
          I imagine you're actually replying to where I wrote"I notice he doesn't mention how Jack Kirby felt about the way DC treated him and his creations.  Very circumspect.  I guess that's a good idea, don't jeopardize a paycheck."  I think DC now holds up their allowances for Siegel and Shuster as good PR.  They don't mention that it was Neal Adams' holding them up to public ridicule that basically blackmailed them into paying them.  I agree with you that Alan Moore hasn't made it any easier to supports his complaints.  Neither of these issues have to do with Brian Azzarello's attitude.  What may have something to do with it is what Dan Didio said to him.  I can easily imagine Dan encouraging Brian to throw the baby out with the bath water.
          Thanks,
          Darci


          ________________________________
          From: Edward Bebee <ejb@...>
          To: DC_Comics_Uncensored@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Sunday, November 18, 2012 4:16 PM
          Subject: [DCU] Re: Before Watchmen writer Brian Azzarello | Interview outtakes


           
          Darci sez:
          >I guess we know who we're dealing with here: Mr. "I don't care what anyone says or what anyone has done before me" Azzarello.

          I'm not sure that's totally fair. He does mention Siegel & Shuster.

          Alan Moore is a different case. Moore can be difficult to deal with and holds extreme opinions and grudges. The comics industry -- the companies, fans and press -- have treated him with reverence and kid gloves for decades and in the intervening years he's becomes a bitter old man who spits on everyone in interviews.

          I really like & still buy his work. I used to have a lot of sympathy for his position but it's hard to maintain as he's gone off the rails in recent years.

          He's on record as saying that since his early works, comics have done nothing significant and they will never become "literature".

          However, one only has to read a work like Habibi to know comics already are literature and the medium has left Moore behind.

          And it's not like Moore has respect for other creators like J.M Barrie whose characters he used and went out of his way to avoid paying royalties for.

          None of this justifies DC's or even Marvel's treatment of him but Moore makes it as difficult as possible to take his side of things. If Azzarello has no sympathy, I can't blame him.

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        • Edward Bebee
          ... Azzarello was asked about Moore specifically. He brought Siegel & Shuster into the conversation and said that he was more sympathetic to their situation
          Message 4 of 4 , Nov 20, 2012
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            Darci:
            > I imagine you're actually replying to where I wrote "I notice he doesn't mention how Jack Kirby felt about the way DC treated him and his creations. Very circumspect. I guess that's a good idea, don't jeopardize a paycheck."

            Azzarello was asked about Moore specifically. He brought Siegel & Shuster into the conversation and said that he was more sympathetic to their situation than Moore's. I didn't read that as being an apologist for DC on the S&S issue, Kirby's issues or creator rights in general.

            As Moore has dismissed the work of every writer currently working in comics irregardless of the company they work for, I don't blame Azzarello for being unsympathetic towards Moore. Moore set himself up for that one.

            To what degree Azzarello is protecting a paycheque, hard to say.

            A lot of current writers have done well and enjoy rights because of what Kirby et al went through and the negotiations & concessions that happened over the years as a result. Certainly, current creators owe a huge debt to them.

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