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Re:Indie comics

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  • Richard J.
    I ve often wondered about exclamations that these moments were the new era of comic books, when all that seems to happen is their spark goes out and 1940s DC
    Message 1 of 5 , Feb 9, 2007
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      I've often wondered about exclamations that these moments were the new
      era of comic books, when all that seems to happen is their spark goes
      out and 1940s DC and 1960s Marvel both emerge back to the forefront.

      Comicbook: Confidential focused on all of these other titles and such
      in comic books, but none of those lasted either.

      There seems to be yet another banner and another banner, offering
      alternatives to The Big Two, but these alternatives come and go so
      quickly.

      In truth, there has really been no fleshing out from what Stan Lee
      established with his offering. All of Marvel is just a constant
      extension of his work.

      Stan didn't create Rogue and Wolverine, but he did create the Xmen.

      Why do none of these second tier companies or titles seem to be able
      to hold on?

      --- In DC_Comics_uncensored@yahoogroups.com, Mark Brodersen
      <mark_brodersen@...> wrote:
      >
      > Spawn is still published but is not anywhere near the powerhouse he
      was 10 years or so ago. Wildcats are published by DC now, along with
      all of the Wildstorm properties. Savage Dragon is still chugging
      along with Erik Larsen still at the helm. The independent superheroes
      of that era had their time in the sun but will probably never peak
      like they did back then. Cyberforce is coming back from Wildstorm /
      DC.
    • King Hyperion
      I agree totally! DC And Marvel are both victims of ther ‘glorious’ past and as a result we have the mutliverse and the 100 year old Superman coming back!
      Message 2 of 5 , Feb 9, 2007
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        I agree totally! DC And Marvel are both victims of ther ‘glorious’ past and as a result we have the mutliverse and the 100 year old Superman coming back!

         


        From: DC_Comics_uncensored@yahoogroups.com [mailto: DC_Comics_uncensored@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of Richard J.
        Sent: Friday, February 09, 2007 2:38 PM
        To: DC_Comics_uncensored@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [DCU] Re:Indie comics

         

        I've often wondered about exclamations that these moments were the new
        era of comic books, when all that seems to happen is their spark goes
        out and 1940s DC and 1960s Marvel both emerge back to the forefront.

        Comicbook: Confidential focused on all of these other titles and such
        in comic books, but none of those lasted either.

        There seems to be yet another banner and another banner, offering
        alternatives to The Big Two, but these alternatives come and go so
        quickly.

        In truth, there has really been no fleshing out from what Stan Lee
        established with his offering. All of Marvel is just a constant
        extension of his work.

        Stan didn't create Rogue and Wolverine, but he did create the Xmen.

        Why do none of these second tier companies or titles seem to be able
        to hold on?

        --- In DC_Comics_uncensore d@yahoogroups. com, Mark Brodersen
        <mark_brodersen@ ...> wrote:

        >
        > Spawn is still published but is not anywhere near the powerhouse he
        was 10 years or so ago. Wildcats are published by DC now, along with
        all of the Wildstorm properties. Savage Dragon is still chugging
        along with Erik Larsen still at the helm. The independent superheroes
        of that era had their time in the sun but will probably never peak
        like they did back then. Cyberforce is coming back from Wildstorm /
        DC.


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      • Mark Brodersen
        Why aren t there any independent (non-DC, non-Marvel) publishers that can hang on ? I assume what you mean is Why aren t there any successful long running
        Message 3 of 5 , Feb 10, 2007
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          Why aren't there any independent (non-DC, non-Marvel) publishers that can hang on ? 
           
          I assume what you mean is "Why aren't there any successful long running alternative superhero universes from any other companies besides DC or Marvel ?"
           
          The simple answer :  There isn't enough pie to spread around besides the Entrenched Two, at least "universes" with multiple titles more than say a half dozen or so at most.  The Big Two will simply squeeze more money out of the existing fanbase by putting out more titles (where they're good or not) and more reprints too.  They have a stronger pull on most fans with established heroes, histories and continuities and a lot of fans still have the collector mentality of "complete runs".
           
          The two have also exerted pressure on freelancers by not giving work to creators who perform for whom they consider a stronger competitor.  This is not always the case, especially when said creator is a big name or superstar that can still pull sales for them i.e. Frank Miller, Neil Gaiman, Alan Moore, etc.  Someone will point out, I'm sure, historical references of creators that did work for both the Big Two (at least one of them) and some other lower tier publisher with a competing universe.  I'm sure it can happen, but it is not encouraged, to say the least.
           
          It's sad  I never cared nearly as much for Image's offerings, though I did admire the spirit of the seven who spearheaded and formed Image.  In 1993 there were multiple publishers trying to put together their coherent superhero universes and most of them were pretty good.  Valiant & Dark Horse had my favorites, but other good offerings around that same time included Techno (later Big), Defiant (after Shooter left Valiant), Milestone, Malibu, Topps, and other smaller ones.  I usually enjoyed them because they weren't nearly as stagnant or merchandised and were much more willing to be cutting edge and take risks.
           
           


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