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6714Re: Jonah Hex - SPOILERS!!!

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  • Darci
    Jul 1, 2010
    • 0 Attachment
      Taylor,
      This conversation occurred a little while ago at the SilverAgeReviews group:




      ________________________________
      From: Darci <darci386@...>
      To: SilverAgeReviews@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Mon, June 21, 2010 11:44:36 AM
      Subject: Re: [SAR] "Jonah Hex" movie preview (no major spoilers)


      Believe it or not, the credits list three writers:  Mark Neveldine, William Farmer, and Brian Tayler.  They also credit John Albano and Tony DeZuniga for the original character.  The company is Legendary Pictures, who were behind Batman Begins, Superman Returns, and other films.
      Thanks,
      Darci




      ________________________________
      From: Robert Faires <rfaires@...>
      To: SilverAgeReviews@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Fri, June 18, 2010 3:52:53 PM
      Subject: Re: [SAR] "Jonah Hex" movie preview (no major spoilers)

       
      Thanks for the review, Bill.

      Silver Age books are the books of my childhood, so I have the deepest fondness for them. But the Bronze Age launched just as I was hitting adolescence, and that era's more "mature" or "adult" (for lack of any better words) treatment of violence, sex, and social commentary really resonated with my own expanding worldiness. So many of the fantasy, horror, Western, war, and other genre books from then hold a more special place in my heart than a lot of the superhero books of the time. That's by way of saying that I have just enough affection for the original Jonah Hex that I probably wouldn't be able to let go and enjoy an over-the-top movie version.

      Robert Faires
      Austin, Texas


      On Fri, Jun 18, 2010 at 3:24 PM, <WRHBill@aol. com> wrote:

       
      >I had the chance last night to see a preview of the "Jonah Hex" movie.  It's not exactly Silver Age-related- - Jonah is more of a Bronze Age phenomenon than Silver Age-- but I thought I'd post some reactions here.  I'll try to avoid any major spoilers.
      >
      >First off, I guess I can recommend the movie.  It was entertaining, I had a good time, though it was pretty silly in a lot of ways-- kind of a "guilty pleasure". (But don't bring your young kids.  I'm not sure what the rating was, but it's too violent for them.)
      >
      >Brief plot summary:  as in the comics, Jonah Hex is a ruthless Old West bounty hunter, scarred physically and mentally by experiences dating back to the Civil War, and feared and despised by "normal" people (and a wanted oulaw himself due to events at the start of the film), but with a hidden spot of decency.  When an old enemy of his, a Confederate- general-turned terrorist named Trumbull (played by John Malkovich) turns up alive, Hex is recruited by the U.S. government to hunt him down and stop his evil plans. 
      >
      >As for my other main reaction, I'll preface it with what may seem like a digression.  Back in the 1980's, there was a comic book created by Mike Grell called JON SABLE, FREELANCE.  It was a pretty good comic book, about a bodyguard/investiga tor/soldier- of-fortune for hire who moonlights as a children's book author.  In 1987 it was adapted into a short-lived TV series called just SABLE.  My reaction to that show, other than that it wasn't very good, was that it was the first example I'd ever seen of a film adaptation of a comic book which was deliberately made MORE "comic-booky" than the original comic book, rather than less.  Grell flirted with superhero tropes in the early issues of the comic book-- Sable wore a painted "battle mask" on his face for a while, but once Grell determined that the comic would sell as a straight, relatively realistic adventure comic, that's how he played it.  The TV show, on the other hand, made Jon Sable into a
      quasi-superhero with a "secret identity"  and a ninja-suit costume. 
      >
      >Likewise, despite appearing for part of its original run in a comic book titled WEIRD WESTERN, Jonah Hex was (and I guess still is, though I haven't followed the current revival very closely) a fairly straight Western.  Jonah in the comics was improbably skilled with weapons and resistant to being killed, but I don't recall him having any super-powers or supernatural abilities, and his adventures, though violent and melodramatic, were mostly events that could hypothetically have happened in the real Old West.  This movie, on the other hand, has strong element of supernatural fantasy and general "comic-bookiness", in addition to touches of "alternate history" (parts of this movie sure never happened in the year 1876 that I know about) and "steampunk".  In addition to being a hyper-fast gun and almost literally impossible to kill, the movie Jonah Hex does have a "super-power" of sorts, albeit a grisly and bizarre one (I'll leave the exact nature of the
      "power" unspoiled).  The villain Trumbull is also is also very much in the comic book mold.  He wants to Destroy America, not just rob banks or get revenge on Hex, and he even has a super-weapon (its exact nature is unclear, but it seems to be something like an early model atomic bomb). 
      >
      >Oh, and -- minor SPOILER here-- the villain also follows the Comic Book Archvillain's Code of Conduct in another respect.  Despite being utterly evil and ruthless, when the villain gets the good guy (Hex, more or less) in his power, he doesn't kill him and make sure he's out of the way permanently.  (Granted, with this version of Hex, killing him might not "take", but at least the bad guy could have tried.)  He chains Hex up (along with his girlfriend; Hex is luckier in love in the movie than he generally was in the comic books) and then *goes away*, leaving Hex and girl alone without even a henchman to watch them, so that they can have the chance to cleverly escape. 
      >
      >I didn't think of it till late in the movie, because I was never personally a fan of the TV show or the movie adaptation, but this movie may remind others of "The Wild, Wild West" with its anachronistic fantasy elements.  It even has President Ulysses Grant as a character, who recruits Hex as an agent (I guess Jim West was busy somewhere else and couldn't deal with Trumbull). 
      >
      >The other thing that struck me about the *idea* of a Jonah Hex movie, before I ever saw the movie, was that it represented a kind of full-circle irony.  The HEX comic book originated as an attempt to replicate (insofar it could be done under Comics Code limitations of the time) in comic-book format the grim'n'gritty "Spaghetti Western" movies of the 60's and 70's.  Now the comic book, created to imitate movies, becomes a movie itself.  But the movie turns out to have more in common with earlier comic-book forebears, such as the spooky original GHOST RIDER comic, than with the Spaghetti Westerns. 
      >
      >I don't mean to sound too disdainful.  Obviously, as a lifelong comic book fan, I'm not averse to a good, rousing, gloriously silly comic book fantasy yarn.  But it might have been interesting if this movie had hewed a bit more to reality and believability.
      >
      >
      >


      I suppose Bill was trying to avoid a spoiler by not mentioning the "Pushing Daisies" power.
      Thanks,
      Darci
       



      ________________________________
      From: "Taylor401306@..." <Taylor401306@...>
      To: Marvel_Comics_Universe@yahoogroups.com
      Cc: return_of_everything_dc@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Thu, July 1, 2010 9:28:30 AM
      Subject: Re: [Marvel_Comics_Universe] Jonah Hex

       
      Date: Tues, Jun 29 2010 5:19 pm
      From: "rwa2play, The Northern Lariat" 

      > And they wonder why Jonah Hex is a major fail at the box office.

      I finally went & saw "Jonah Hex". It wasn't that bad of a movie but they
      had to give him a "super-power"- like "Pushing Daisies", he's now able to
      bring the dead back to life for 1 minute so they can give him clues for the
      criminals he's bounty-hunting.

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