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Re: ISSUE: A little history

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  • Irena Steinerová
    Hello everybody, ... between formal and informal styles in general. Am I generalizing, Irena? I don t think there is a big difference between the gulf in
    Message 1 of 16 , Dec 1, 1999
      Hello everybody,

      >> I have heard several Slovaks say there can be a wide gulf in Slovak
      between formal and informal styles in general. Am I generalizing, Irena?

      I don't think there is a big difference between the gulf in Slovak and a gap
      in Czech;
      actually, the Czech gap may be even wider because, for instance, the Czech
      language uses an "-ej" suffix for adjectives in very informal style
      (dobry/dobrej), while Slovak lacks this feature (they have "dobry" only for
      masculine gender), and, for this reason, it is easier to make Czech texts
      look very informal (eg. commercials for mobile phones, etc.)

      As for the archaeology issue, I have a photocopy of about a 60-page
      dictionary of archaeological terms (it was a part of a textbook from the
      Faculty of Archaeology); I don't know what the quality is like, but the
      terms you have mentioned are there at least. Alastair, this is your field -
      if you (or anybody else) want to see it, let me know.

      Paul and Melvyn, thanks for your help; I understand that my message did not
      get through ( I never read my own messages again).
      Irena
    • Alastair Millar
      ... !!!!! YES PLEASE !!!!! Very much and very urgently! This document has almost obtained the status of urban myth among my clients in this field (sorry
      Message 2 of 16 , Dec 1, 1999
        It was written thus:

        >As for the archaeology issue, I have a photocopy of about a 60-page
        >dictionary of archaeological terms (it was a part of a textbook from the
        >Faculty of Archaeology); I don't know what the quality is like, but the
        >terms you have mentioned are there at least. Alastair, this is your field -
        >if you (or anybody else) want to see it, let me know.

        !!!!! YES PLEASE !!!!!
        Very much and very urgently!

        This document has almost obtained the status of "urban myth" among my
        clients in this field (sorry about the pun...). Many of them speak very good
        English themselves, and while everyone knows someone who has seen a copy,
        nobody has seen it themselves.

        It would be very interesting indeed to compare it with the terms that I have
        spent the last five years gathering - and it might explain some of the
        recurring mistakes I see in the English that I correct, too. I will be in
        town on Wednesday next week - can we meet?

        Cheers

        Alastair
      • Kostas Zgafas
        ... French ... centuries ... today... I see, you mean that you are using these Americans to do all this hard work for you, right? They write In Majorca Daily
        Message 3 of 16 , Dec 1, 1999
          > Yes, of course the (economic/political/military) conqueror wishes to
          > administer his new territory in his own language. For example, Norman
          French
          > was the language of the ruling classes in England for a couple of
          centuries
          > after the Conquest in 1066; English went around the globe with the British
          > Empire in the 19th century, and is spread by US-led economic forces
          today...

          I see, you mean that you are using these Americans to do all this hard work
          for you, right? They write In Majorca Daily Bulletin (I bought during the
          vacation, it is something like the Prague Post, just tailored for Majorca,
          and it is quite strictly British):

          "The founding principles of the US were British ideas of liberty and
          democracy, which somehow slipped out of our hands and drifted across the
          North Atlantic. They are Britain�s very own buried treasure, stored and
          preserved an ocean away. Now, it is time to reclaim them for ourselves".

          I think that I got that trick of English speaking people how to acquire new
          territories. Its actually both very subtle and powerful at the same time. As
          an example, in the Majorca Daily Bulletin (MDB) they write (very
          emotionally) about a British politician named Ashcroft, about his intention
          to push for a law to imprison homeless people and beggars, then, they (MDB)
          continue declaring a protest against this on behalf of all Balearic Islands,
          saying that there are about 100,000 people living in poverty on these
          islands. To summarize: they create a "common territorial sense" through
          common political issues.

          Kostas
          (believing that all this stuff is VERY relevant to translation)
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