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Re: [Czechlist] soudni razitko / sworn translations info and request for help

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  • Martin Janda
    Hi Matej, Very briefly: you should apply where you have your permanent residence. in Prague, AFAIk, it´s virtually impossible - waiting list too long, and new
    Message 1 of 3 , Jan 4, 2002
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi Matej,

      Very briefly: you should apply where you have your permanent residence. in Prague, AFAIk, it´s virtually impossible - waiting list too long, and new vacations only if someone dies or give up (both rare). Maybe easier in Ostrava. Second, you need at least two "statnice" general and special (translator/interpreting). Some courts ask for a third course, not specified. If you don´t have problem with either of the points, let´s talk about it further.

      BTW, if there is another providing the stamping service, I would appreciate getting a contact/rates as well. I need it quite often too...

      Martin
      (who was asking the same question before and gave up after a thorough search)
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Matej Klimes
      To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Friday, January 04, 2002 11:26 AM
      Subject: [Czechlist] soudni razitko / sworn translations info and request for help


      Hi list,

      I need information on practical side of having one of these nifty sworn
      translators oval stamps that allows you to charge double rates :)

      I've been considering getting one for a while now, not that I usually do
      that kind of translation, but every now and then even technical documents
      need to be "soudne potvrzene".....

      What I would like to know is:

      most important:
      1) - An acquaintance in Ostrava whom I quizzed about
      translating when I first got back to Czecho told me once that when you do
      get one of those, you are by law required to take ANY translation or
      interpreting job from whatever court issued the stamp for you, AT THEIR
      RATES (!) and terms, they pay crap and only half a year later, etc.
      etc.......
      He said they just send you documents or orders for interpreting in a
      registered letter and if you pick up the letter that's it, you have to do
      it......

      That seems very strange to me, but he insisted that's what happens and said
      that he gets around it by chatting up the mailwoman to leave him a message
      at the back of the registered letter slip whenever something from the local
      court arrives.....


      2) Where do you apply for one (and is this where you work, i.e. Prague for
      me, or where you are registered (ZL), i.e. Ostrava for me...)

      3) What are the requirements - I hear that some proof of formal education in
      translating might be necessary???

      4) Is the stamp/certificate, whatever entitles you to do this, limited to
      one or several languages? Obviously I'm not intending to translate Icelandic
      and put the stamp on it if/when I get it...., but if I or a trustworthy
      translator did the translation and someone else was doing the red tape bit,
      would they (the holder of the stamp) need to hold the stamp for that
      language (i.e. does it say on the stamp which languages the person is
      authorized to use it for?)
      I know this is pushing it, but the whole thing is burreaucracy anyway, isn't
      it?, so as long as I trusted the person who did the translation, I could
      theoretically stamp it even in a language I'm not an expert at, my question
      is: is this technically correct, i.e. would the stamp be valid if, when
      looked up by the certificate number, it says that the person who stamped can
      only do so in such and such languages and this is not one of them, is this
      how it works?

      Can anyone confirm or correct this and generally give me an idea of what
      getting the magic stamp is about?

      Thanks....

      PS: Incidently, one of my clients needs the stamp on a translation just now,
      it's only two pages and I'm pretty sure it's within my professional reach
      (to be done next week, I haven't seen it yet and picking it up today....).
      If there is anyone in posession of the rubber miracle on the list who'd be
      interested in either doing the magic with my translation, or translating it
      themselves (should be computer industry-related), please contact me off
      the list, I will be very grateful - rates negotiable......

      TIA,
      Matej






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      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • PSS Praha - Coilin O' Connor
      Hi Matej, I can´t help you with most of your questions, but I do know that all the court translator´s stamps I have seen specifically state the language(s)
      Message 2 of 3 , Jan 4, 2002
      • 0 Attachment
        Hi Matej,

        I can´t help you with most of your questions, but I do know that all the
        court translator´s stamps I have seen specifically state the language(s) he
        or she is authorised to translate.

        HTH
        Best regards

        Coilin
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "Matej Klimes" <mklimes@...>
        To: <Czechlist@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Friday, January 04, 2002 11:26 AM
        Subject: [Czechlist] soudni razitko / sworn translations info and request
        for help


        > Hi list,
        >
        > I need information on practical side of having one of these nifty sworn
        > translators oval stamps that allows you to charge double rates :)
        >
        > I've been considering getting one for a while now, not that I usually do
        > that kind of translation, but every now and then even technical documents
        > need to be "soudne potvrzene".....
        >
        > What I would like to know is:
        >
        > most important:
        > 1) - An acquaintance in Ostrava whom I quizzed about
        > translating when I first got back to Czecho told me once that when you do
        > get one of those, you are by law required to take ANY translation or
        > interpreting job from whatever court issued the stamp for you, AT THEIR
        > RATES (!) and terms, they pay crap and only half a year later, etc.
        > etc.......
        > He said they just send you documents or orders for interpreting in a
        > registered letter and if you pick up the letter that's it, you have to do
        > it......
        >
        > That seems very strange to me, but he insisted that's what happens and
        said
        > that he gets around it by chatting up the mailwoman to leave him a message
        > at the back of the registered letter slip whenever something from the
        local
        > court arrives.....
        >
        >
        > 2) Where do you apply for one (and is this where you work, i.e. Prague for
        > me, or where you are registered (ZL), i.e. Ostrava for me...)
        >
        > 3) What are the requirements - I hear that some proof of formal education
        in
        > translating might be necessary???
        >
        > 4) Is the stamp/certificate, whatever entitles you to do this, limited to
        > one or several languages? Obviously I'm not intending to translate
        Icelandic
        > and put the stamp on it if/when I get it...., but if I or a trustworthy
        > translator did the translation and someone else was doing the red tape
        bit,
        > would they (the holder of the stamp) need to hold the stamp for that
        > language (i.e. does it say on the stamp which languages the person is
        > authorized to use it for?)
        > I know this is pushing it, but the whole thing is burreaucracy anyway,
        isn't
        > it?, so as long as I trusted the person who did the translation, I could
        > theoretically stamp it even in a language I'm not an expert at, my
        question
        > is: is this technically correct, i.e. would the stamp be valid if, when
        > looked up by the certificate number, it says that the person who stamped
        can
        > only do so in such and such languages and this is not one of them, is this
        > how it works?
        >
        > Can anyone confirm or correct this and generally give me an idea of what
        > getting the magic stamp is about?
        >
        > Thanks....
        >
        > PS: Incidently, one of my clients needs the stamp on a translation just
        now,
        > it's only two pages and I'm pretty sure it's within my professional reach
        > (to be done next week, I haven't seen it yet and picking it up today....).
        > If there is anyone in posession of the rubber miracle on the list who'd be
        > interested in either doing the magic with my translation, or translating
        it
        > themselves (should be computer industry-related), please contact me off
        > the list, I will be very grateful - rates negotiable......
        >
        > TIA,
        > Matej
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Czechlist: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Czechlist
        > Post message: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
        >
        > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
        >
        >
        >
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