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Re: [Czechlist] Re: lead batteries, accumulators...

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  • Jirka Bolech
    Dear Sabina, ... Very generally: You can _recharge an accumulator_, which applies to both lead (acid) and nickel-cadmium kinds, as opposed to a _galvanic
    Message 1 of 5 , Jan 2, 2002
      Dear Sabina,

      > olovene akumulatory
      > nikl-kadmiove baterie
      > alkalicke galvanicke clanky

      Very generally:

      You can _recharge an accumulator_, which applies to both
      lead (acid) and nickel-cadmium kinds, as opposed to a
      _galvanic cell_, which you _can't_.

      There are different kinds of galvanic cells, depending of
      what materials the electrodes are from and what material the
      electrolyte is. Alkaline (galvanic) cell means the
      electrolyte is _alkaline as opposed to acid_. The word
      "cell" alone, however, can also refer to an accumulator
      type; you might then speak about a "rechargable cell".
      Again, there are quite a few different kinds of different
      materials.

      Battery, strictly speaking, is a _group of cells_ while a
      cell is only one set of, two, electrodes in an electrolyte.
      A battery is typically in one physical unit and (,
      internally,) usually connected in series (as opposed to "in
      parallel"), which adds together voltages of the cells. Since
      language is a precise tool in inexact usage, a lot of people
      often call even a single cell a battery.

      More specifically:

      I believe there are more than one type of lead accumulators,
      so <lead accumulator> should do fine, but I equally believe
      that the most common type, the one you probably have in your
      car, is lead acid accumulator.

      <Nickel-cadmium battery> or nickel-cadmium cell or
      nickel-cadmium accumulator all make sense, the first one
      being probably most often used.

      I've never practically encountered the two attributives,
      alkaline and galvanic, together, however an <alkaline
      galvanic cell> sounds okay to me. Common folks just say
      <alkaline battery> most of the time, though.

      Hope I haven't made it too complicated for you. Good luck
      with the translation...

      Jirka Bolech
    • JPKIRCHNER@aol.com
      ... This may be a situation where you need clarification from the client. One of the definitions of akumulator in the Cesko-anglicky technicky slovnik is
      Message 2 of 5 , Jan 2, 2002
        In a message dated 1/2/02 5:34:06 AM, Sabina.Kralova@... writes:

        >olovene akumulatory
        >nikl-kadmiove baterie
        >alkalicke galvanicke clanky
        >
        >Via Google I found: lead batteries, nickel-cadmium batteries and alkaline
        >batteries - but I do not know whether this is correct. Don't understand
        >the technical difference between akumulator, baterie a galvanicky clanek, and
        >the text I am to translate distinguishes these three terms.

        This may be a situation where you need clarification from the client. One of
        the definitions of "akumulator" in the Cesko-anglicky technicky slovnik is
        "battery (US)", and the dictionaries I have here from English-speaking
        countries list "accumulator" and "battery" as being exactly the same thing
        ("accumulator" being listed as British and "battery" being designated as
        American). The Random House Dictionary of the English Language lists
        "galvanic cell" as being equivalent in meaning to "battery" and
        "accumulator". The American Heritage Dictionary of Science lists "galvanic
        cell", gives a description of a battery, and also says the expression is
        synonymous with "voltaic cell". That dictionary does not even list "battery"
        or "accumulator". Part of the explanation of "cell" in that dictionary says,
        "A battery consists of one or more cells." So, evidently a cell is an
        electrical generating unit, and a battery is thought of as some assembly.
        However, on the street, people tend to think of "cell" and "battery" as
        equivalent.

        So, in English, these three terms are apparently equivalent, for the most
        part. If there is a distinction between them, it may be peculiar to your
        client's company or industry, or it may be too fine to show up in
        dictionaries. (Or it may even be Czenglish.) I would just ask the client.

        Jamie
      • JPKIRCHNER@aol.com
        ... Note that in the US we refer to rechargeable nickel-cadmium and lead batteries . Jamie
        Message 3 of 5 , Jan 2, 2002
          In a message dated 1/2/02 7:27:49 AM, jirka.bolech@... writes:

          >You can _recharge an accumulator_, which applies to both
          >lead (acid) and nickel-cadmium kinds, as opposed to a
          >_galvanic cell_, which you _can't_.

          Note that in the US we refer to rechargeable nickel-cadmium and lead
          "batteries".

          Jamie
        • Petr Jarolím
          niklkadmiove bateriove are akumulatory in CZ (batteries in ENG) and can be recharged olovene akumulatory are akumulatory in CZ (baterries in ENG) and can be
          Message 4 of 5 , Jan 2, 2002
            niklkadmiove bateriove are akumulatory in CZ (batteries in ENG) and can be
            recharged
            olovene akumulatory are akumulatory in CZ (baterries in ENG) and can be
            recharged
            alkalicke galvanicke clanky can not be recharged (cells in ENG)
            Hana


            ----- Original Message -----
            From: "Sabina Kr�lov�" <Sabina.Kralova@...>
            To: <Czechlist@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Wednesday, January 02, 2002 11:39 AM
            Subject: Re: [Czechlist] Re: lead batteries, accumulators...


            > Hi everyone,
            >
            > could someone help me, please, with:
            >
            > olovene akumulatory
            > nikl-kadmiove baterie
            > alkalicke galvanicke clanky
            >
            > Via Google I found: lead batteries, nickel-cadmium batteries and alkaline
            > batteries - but I do not know whether this is correct. Don't understand
            the
            > technical difference between akumulator, baterie a galvanicky clanek, and
            > the text I am to translate distinguishes these three terms.
            > Thanks
            > Sabina Kralova
            >
            >
            >
            > Czechlist: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Czechlist
            > Post message: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
            >
            > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
            >
            >
            >
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