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Re: Sanacni (was TERMS)

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  • melvyn.geo
    ... UK thing. Still, anti-moisture would probably be fully acceptable in a construction context, because moisture is referred to often in regard to plaster,
    Message 1 of 8 , Dec 12, 2001
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      --- In Czechlist@y..., JPKIRCHNER@a... wrote:

      >
      > I can imagine "anti-dampness", but never "anti-damp", unless it's a
      UK thing. Still, anti-moisture would probably be fully acceptable in
      a construction context, because moisture is referred to often in
      regard to plaster, basement walls, etc.
      >

      So don't you ever have problems with rising damp over there or rather
      with damp-proofing companies making a packet out of claiming you have
      rising damp? :)

      http://www.onthelevel.in-uk.com/damp-proofing.htm.

      Damp Proofing and rising damp treatment.

      Millions are spent every year in the UK "curing" the problem of
      rising damp. But does it even exist?

      "Rising damp" is a very rare phenomenon. So rare that many serious
      construction researchers have never seen it. I have personally
      surveyed over 500 properties throughout the UK which have been
      diagnosed as suffering from rising damp, and I have found in every
      case that the diagnosis was wrong. Mike Parrett of Lewisham Council
      in London (see below) has investigated over 5000 buildings and he has
      never found rising damp either. So what is going on here? How come
      surveyors are finding rising damp where it doesn't exist?

      The answer lies in commercial pressures. The "surveyors" who work for
      damp-proofing companies are actually salesmen. They make their money
      by taking a percentage commission on the damp-proofing work they
      specify. So if you invite a damp-proofing company to inspect your
      home for dampness problems, you should not be surprised if
      they "discover" its existence. That's how they make a living.


      M.
    • JPKIRCHNER@aol.com
      ... We have rising moisture and moisture-proofing companies. Damp is an adjective, and it sounds strange to me used as a noun. Jamie
      Message 2 of 8 , Dec 12, 2001
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        In a message dated 12/12/01 8:30:11 AM, zehrovak@... writes:

        >So don't you ever have problems with rising damp over there or rather
        >with damp-proofing companies making a packet out of claiming you have
        >rising damp? :)

        We have rising moisture and moisture-proofing companies. "Damp" is an
        adjective, and it sounds strange to me used as a noun.

        Jamie
      • Matej Klimes
        Whatever you call it, Melvyn and Jamie, houses in your respective countries definitely have problems with it, despite what that quote of Melvyn says. And I
        Message 3 of 8 , Dec 12, 2001
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          Whatever you call it, Melvyn and Jamie,

          houses in your respective countries definitely have problems with it,
          despite what that quote of Melvyn says.

          And I dont think one needs a surveyor to know, if your plaster and paint are
          flaking and falling off the wall, or there's green stuff on it, you've got
          the problem, I've got it in places in my house in Prague (1920's).

          Newer houses should be well insulated against ground moisture/dampness (?),
          but everything's possible in England and America, I saw some very poorly
          constructed houses in both countries, not that we don't have them, but at
          least we don't pretend that houses will "heat themselves up" by themselves
          or from one tiny fireplace downstairs and we generally slap a bit of
          insulation wherever it needs to go, that's for new structures...

          Old houses (before they had modern bitumen and plastic insulation) sometimes
          used slate sheets inserted into the wall above foundations (footings for
          M.), but slate breaks as the house moves, and it isn't perfect to start
          with, it won't cover the entire wall cross-section at places and has to be
          joined.....

          Hapy moisture and damp - free day.

          Matej




          ----- Original Message -----
          From: melvyn.geo <zehrovak@...>
          To: <Czechlist@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Wednesday, December 12, 2001 2:29 PM
          Subject: [Czechlist] Re: Sanacni (was TERMS)


          > --- In Czechlist@y..., JPKIRCHNER@a... wrote:
          >
          > >
          > > I can imagine "anti-dampness", but never "anti-damp", unless it's a
          > UK thing. Still, anti-moisture would probably be fully acceptable in
          > a construction context, because moisture is referred to often in
          > regard to plaster, basement walls, etc.
          > >
          >
          > So don't you ever have problems with rising damp over there or rather
          > with damp-proofing companies making a packet out of claiming you have
          > rising damp? :)
          >
          > http://www.onthelevel.in-uk.com/damp-proofing.htm.
          >
          > Damp Proofing and rising damp treatment.
          >
          > Millions are spent every year in the UK "curing" the problem of
          > rising damp. But does it even exist?
          >
          > "Rising damp" is a very rare phenomenon. So rare that many serious
          > construction researchers have never seen it. I have personally
          > surveyed over 500 properties throughout the UK which have been
          > diagnosed as suffering from rising damp, and I have found in every
          > case that the diagnosis was wrong. Mike Parrett of Lewisham Council
          > in London (see below) has investigated over 5000 buildings and he has
          > never found rising damp either. So what is going on here? How come
          > surveyors are finding rising damp where it doesn't exist?
          >
          > The answer lies in commercial pressures. The "surveyors" who work for
          > damp-proofing companies are actually salesmen. They make their money
          > by taking a percentage commission on the damp-proofing work they
          > specify. So if you invite a damp-proofing company to inspect your
          > home for dampness problems, you should not be surprised if
          > they "discover" its existence. That's how they make a living.
          >
          >
          > M.
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Czechlist: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Czechlist
          > Post message: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
          >
          > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
          >
        • Simon Vaughan
          ... According to my information, Melvyn got a response to his message within 1 minute 48 seconds of sending it. That must be a Czechlist record! Simon
          Message 4 of 8 , Dec 12, 2001
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            > > So don't you ever have problems with rising damp over there or
            > > rather with damp-proofing companies making a packet out of
            > > claiming you have rising damp? :)
            >
            > We have rising moisture and moisture-proofing companies. "Damp"
            > is an adjective, and it sounds strange to me used as a noun.

            According to my information, Melvyn got a response to his message within 1
            minute 48 seconds of sending it. That must be a Czechlist record!

            Simon
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