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Re: translators vs. teachers

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  • Vladimir Vitvar
    ... simply ... (No idea why Martin shouted so much 8-D) Good points from Martin. I am doing both. I have been a (now nearly) full-time teacher for seven years
    Message 1 of 2 , May 3, 2000
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      Melvyn wrote:

      >Yes I am sure you are right - though that was not my main point. I am
      simply
      >pointing out that there is an increasing demand for language teachers and
      >that surely this is an opportunity for experienced translators.

      Martin wrote:

      >I AM NOT SURE A GOOD TRANSLATOR EQUALS A GOOD LANGUAGE TEACHER. WITH MANY
      >HOURS SPENT TYPING AT YOUR DESKTOP, YOU CAN DEVELOP A LOT OF SKILLS
      >(INCLUDING A TWISTED BACKBONE ;-)) BUT YOUR ACCENT AND FLUENCY AND ABILITY
      >TO SPEAK GOES INVARIABLY DOWN (THIS PROBABLY DOES NOT APPLY TO NATIVE
      >SPEAKERS, OR DOES IT?) AND YET ANOTHER POINT: CORRECT ME IF I´ M WRONG, BUT
      >AS A GOOD AND SUCESSFUL TRANSLATOR, YOU CAN EARN MUCH MORE THAN WITH
      >TEACHING ENGLISH. BTW, I SEE MYSELF AS A RATHER HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS
      >TRANSLATOR, BUT I WOULD NOT DARE TO TEACH (HAVE NO ATTITUDE, ACCENT,
      >PATIENCE NOR SKILLS).
      (No idea why Martin shouted so much 8-D)

      Good points from Martin. I am doing both. I have been a (now nearly)
      full-time teacher for seven years and a nearly-full-time translator a bit
      shorter. The two are as different as the work of a metallographer and a
      welder; they both work with metal but for different purposes. They both know
      metal but each from a different perspective. Likewise translators know the
      language - what's more they understand it! They work with it - just like
      teachers do. But the aim of the translator is to convey the meaning, to find
      a way to say/write it in the other language, whereas that of a teacher is to
      _SHOW_ how the language is constructed and used.

      Besides, teaching requires a GREAT deal of social skills, and, above all,
      you must not be irritated by people's incompetence, that is the main thing,
      IMO. Perhaps I'm stating the obvious, but I just felt prompted by Melvyn's
      remark (no offence intended) and wanted to confirm Martin's.

      Oh, and I'd second Martin on the financial aspect, too =(:-|)

      Vladimir Vitvar
      v.vitvar@...
    • Vladimir Vitvar
      Melvyn, (who wrote something like are we that exceptional? and many of us do so and so forth - deleted the e-mail) No way did I mean to brag about the two
      Message 2 of 2 , May 6, 2000
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        Melvyn,

        (who wrote something like 'are we that exceptional?' and 'many of us do so'
        and so forth - deleted the e-mail)

        No way did I mean to brag about the two jobs. I don't think we are/I am
        exceptional being so although statistically maybe yes. I just meant to point
        out that the two are REALLY very different (therefore equal) and, as someone
        on this list have said, being a good teacher may not mean they would make a
        good translator and vice versa. I agree the two complement each other in a
        unique and wonderful way (at least for me), but I do different things to
        become a better translator and different things to become a better teacher.
        Is my standpoint any clearer now?

        Cheers,

        Vladimir
        v.vitvar@...

        P.S. Glad there so many of you who dare stand in front of a bunch of wild
        and dangerous, hungry and roaring beasts 8-D. Well, I believe our students
        are NEVER like that but just fancy that idea ...
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