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Re: [Czechlist] TERM Korenice

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  • Jirka Bolech
    ... appears ... Dunno if it s of any help, but this is what the Slovnik spisovneho jazyka ceskeho says about korenice : dr^evo z kor^enu nebo z c^a sti
    Message 1 of 13 , Oct 30, 2001
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      Tony Long wrote:

      > Can anyone help with the English and/or the scientific binomial for
      > 'korˇenice'?It appears in a long list of woods used for veneers and
      appears
      > to be some kind of 'light maple'.

      Dunno if it's of any help, but this is what the "Slovnik spisovneho jazyka
      ceskeho" says about "korenice":

      'dr^evo z kor^enu' nebo z c^a'sti' kmene u kor^ene s letovy'mi kruhy v
      ru'znych sme^rech stoc^eny'mi a zprohy'bany'mi a s nestejny'm zbarveni'm'

      example usage: 'jilmova', or^echova', mahagonova' kor^enice; na'bytek z
      les^te^ne' kor^enice'

      Hey, http://slovnik.seznam.cz yields <curly grain wood>.

      Jirka Bolech
    • Simon Vaughan
      ... If this curled stumpwood is a light maple, perhaps it s sugar maple (Acer saccharum), otherwise known as curly maple? Simon
      Message 2 of 13 , Oct 30, 2001
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        > > Can anyone help with the English and/or the scientific binomial for
        > > 'korˇenice'? It appears in a long list of woods used for veneers and
        > > appears to be some kind of 'light maple'.
        >
        > Dunno if it's of any help, but this is what the "Slovnik spisovneho
        > jazyka ceskeho" says about "korenice":
        >
        > 'dr^evo z kor^enu' nebo z c^a'sti' kmene u kor^ene s letovy'mi kruhy v
        > ru'znych sme^rech stoc^eny'mi a zprohy'bany'mi a s nestejny'm
        > zbarveni'm'
        >
        > example usage: 'jilmova', or^echova', mahagonova' kor^enice; na'bytek z
        > les^te^ne' kor^enice'
        >
        > Hey, http://slovnik.seznam.cz yields <curly grain wood>.

        If this curled stumpwood is a light maple, perhaps it's sugar maple (Acer
        saccharum), otherwise known as curly maple?

        Simon
      • Rubková
        Hi, why just curly maple every tree root is curled. Sarka ... From: Simon Vaughan [mailto:rachelandsimon@quick.cz] Sent: Tuesday, October 30, 2001 1:16 PM To:
        Message 3 of 13 , Oct 30, 2001
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          Hi,

          why just curly maple every tree root is curled.

          Sarka

          -----Original Message-----
          From: Simon Vaughan [mailto:rachelandsimon@...]
          Sent: Tuesday, October 30, 2001 1:16 PM
          To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [Czechlist] TERM Korenice


          > > Can anyone help with the English and/or the scientific binomial for
          > > 'korˇenice'? It appears in a long list of woods used for veneers and
          > > appears to be some kind of 'light maple'.
          >
          > Dunno if it's of any help, but this is what the "Slovnik spisovneho
          > jazyka ceskeho" says about "korenice":
          >
          > 'dr^evo z kor^enu' nebo z c^a'sti' kmene u kor^ene s letovy'mi kruhy v
          > ru'znych sme^rech stoc^eny'mi a zprohy'bany'mi a s nestejny'm
          > zbarveni'm'
          >
          > example usage: 'jilmova', or^echova', mahagonova' kor^enice; na'bytek z
          > les^te^ne' kor^enice'
          >
          > Hey, http://slovnik.seznam.cz yields <curly grain wood>.

          If this curled stumpwood is a light maple, perhaps it's sugar maple (Acer
          saccharum), otherwise known as curly maple?

          Simon




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        • Michael
          ... for kor·enice ? It appears in a long list of woods used for veneers and appears to be some kind of light maple . ... (Acer saccharum), otherwise known
          Message 4 of 13 , Oct 30, 2001
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            > > > Can anyone help with the English and/or the scientific binomial
            for 'kor·enice'? It appears in a long list of woods used for veneers
            and appears to be some kind of 'light maple'.

            > > example usage: 'jilmova', or^echova', mahagonova' kor^enice

            > If this curled stumpwood is a light maple, perhaps it's sugar maple
            (Acer saccharum), otherwise known as curly maple?

            That's probably a good species designation, assuming the original is
            indeed maple and light. (There's also curly soft maple, which is red
            maple, Acer ruburm.) The problem here is that a woodworker or veneer
            worker doesn't care just about the species; he also cares about the
            figure. Specifying the species alone is insufficient.

            Bird's-eye maple is also from sugar maple, a/k/a curly maple, a/k/a
            Acer saccharum. But if I order birds-eye and you deliver *only*
            sugar or curly, I won't pay, or I might sue you for breaking your
            promise. Bird's eye refers to the figure on top of the species.
            Ditto for, say, "quilted" maple. That's also sugar. But I guarantee
            you that prices for quilted maple veneer are higher than for just any
            old sugar maple veneer.

            So a binomical can't identify curly maple as such. Curly maple means
            sugar (rock) maple with a curly figure. Maple isn't the only wood
            that the curly figure comes in. There can also be curly cherry, for
            example. The "curly" figure is sometimes called "fiddleback,"
            because that's a typical, attractive use. Some people claim a
            difference between fiddleback and curly; we don't need to go there.
            The point is that curly, birds-eye, and plain are all three the same
            species; but they aren't the same veneers.

            My main doubt at this point, from the definition in the Slovnik
            spisovne cestiny, is whether burl isn't the figure they mean. Burl
            is obtained from burls (in species which have them often; maples
            don't much) and from roots. Doing a search on "burl curly bird's eye
            cherry maple" found, among other pages, the following:
            http://www.certainlywood.com/figureTypes.html. Maybe looking at some
            of the samples there might help.
          • Michael
            When I said that maples don t have burls much, I should have been more clear. I meant in relative terms of how often one sees burls in them compared to other
            Message 5 of 13 , Oct 30, 2001
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              When I said that maples don't have burls much, I should have been
              more clear. I meant in relative terms of how often one sees burls in
              them compared to other trees when just walking along in the forest.
              In oaks, a lot. In maples, less often. Obviously, they exist.

              Mea culpa.
            • Simon Vaughan
              ... I know the Czech word korenice does not refer to a specific tree. However, Tony obviously had a reason for thinking the wood was a light maple, and so I
              Message 6 of 13 , Oct 30, 2001
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                > why just curly maple every tree root is curled.

                I know the Czech word 'korenice' does not refer to a specific tree.
                However, Tony obviously had a reason for thinking the wood was a light
                maple, and so I suggested a likely light maple in case he was still
                looking to identify the wood more closely. Of course, it could be another
                genus altogether. But maple is a strong contender, as it is noted for its
                curliness. The New Shorter Oxford English Dictionary's fourth definition
                of 'curled' goes as follows: 'Of wood, esp. maple: having a wavy or curly
                grain'.

                By the way, Sarka, a space alone won't do to separate sentences.

                Simon
              • Michael
                Following up, if the figure *is* burl instead of curly, it might not necessarily be sugar maple. If from N.A., it could also be big leaf maple, Acer
                Message 7 of 13 , Oct 30, 2001
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                  Following up, if the figure *is* burl instead of curly, it might not
                  necessarily be sugar maple. If from N.A., it could also be big leaf
                  maple, Acer macrophyllum.

                  "Bigleaf maple is locally significant in British Columbia for the
                  manufacture of furniture, musical instruments, interior panelling,
                  and other select uses such as large bowls turned from maple burls "
                  http://www.for.gov.bc.ca/hfd/pubs/Docs/Mr/Mr090/Mr090-2.pdf

                  "Clusters of round curls that grow into balls on the sides of trees,
                  are known as burls. They are common in the big leaf maple of the west
                  coast."
                  http://www.thewoodbox.com/data/wood/mapleinfo.htm

                  "Big leaf maple (Acer macrophyllum), also known as Pacific or Oregon
                  maple, grows in the Pacific Northwest and is one of the softest of
                  the maples. Maple burl has elegant and interesting swirled grain
                  patterns, often combined with various forms of quilting and bird's
                  eyes."
                  http://tigerlilyworkshop.com/Woodcat/Wood-id.html

                  "Hundreds of tons of burls from redwood, myrtlewood, madrone, and
                  western maple are exported annually from Oregon to France and Italy."
                  http://newton.dep.anl.gov/natbltn/600-699/nb629.htm
                • Rubkova
                  Following up, if the figure *is* burl instead of curly, it might not necessarily be sugar maple. If from N.A., it could also be big leaf maple, Acer
                  Message 8 of 13 , Oct 31, 2001
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                    "Following up, if the figure *is* burl instead of curly, it might not
                    necessarily be sugar maple. If from N.A., it could also be big leaf
                    maple, Acer macrophyllus

                    Yesterdasy I talked with somebody, who knows quite a lot from this field and
                    he told me that "kor^enice" had origanally be just one type of wood only and
                    it was wood from tree (or was it a big shrub - I don't know) called in Czech
                    vr^esovec.
                    Does any you know name of it in English?

                    Sarka
                    -----Original Message-----
                    From: Michael [mailto:tritt002@...]
                    Sent: Tuesday, October 30, 2001 9:37 PM
                    To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: [Czechlist] Re: TERM Korenice



                    "Bigleaf maple is locally significant in British Columbia for the
                    manufacture of furniture, musical instruments, interior panelling,
                    and other select uses such as large bowls turned from maple burls "
                    http://www.for.gov.bc.ca/hfd/pubs/Docs/Mr/Mr090/Mr090-2.pdf

                    "Clusters of round curls that grow into balls on the sides of trees,
                    are known as burls. They are common in the big leaf maple of the west
                    coast."
                    http://www.thewoodbox.com/data/wood/mapleinfo.htm

                    "Big leaf maple (Acer macrophyllum), also known as Pacific or Oregon
                    maple, grows in the Pacific Northwest and is one of the softest of
                    the maples. Maple burl has elegant and interesting swirled grain
                    patterns, often combined with various forms of quilting and bird's
                    eyes."
                    http://tigerlilyworkshop.com/Woodcat/Wood-id.html

                    "Hundreds of tons of burls from redwood, myrtlewood, madrone, and
                    western maple are exported annually from Oregon to France and Italy."
                    http://newton.dep.anl.gov/natbltn/600-699/nb629.htm





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                  • Rubková
                    ... From: Simon Vaughan [mailto:rachelandsimon@quick.cz] Sent: Tuesday, October 30, 2001 9:14 PM To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com Subject: Re: [Czechlist] TERM
                    Message 9 of 13 , Oct 31, 2001
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                      -----Original Message-----
                      From: Simon Vaughan [mailto:rachelandsimon@...]
                      Sent: Tuesday, October 30, 2001 9:14 PM
                      To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
                      Subject: Re: [Czechlist] TERM Korenice


                      >> why just curly maple every tree root is curled.

                      > I know the Czech word 'korenice' does not refer to a specific tree.
                      However, Tony obviously had a reason for thinking the wood was a light
                      maple, and so I suggested a likely light maple in case he was still
                      looking to identify the wood more closely. Of course, it could be another
                      genus altogether. But maple is a strong contender, as it is noted for its
                      curliness. The New Shorter Oxford English Dictionary's fourth definition
                      of 'curled' goes as follows: 'Of wood, esp. maple: having a wavy or curly
                      grain'.

                      > By the way, Sarka, a space alone won't do to separate sentences.

                      Simon

                      I am sorry Simon, I'do better next time.

                      Sarka






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                    • Matej Klimes
                      ... and ... and ... Czech ... It s the wood (smoking) pipes are made of, erica or bell-heather according to one of my dictionaries, but I can t see anyone
                      Message 10 of 13 , Nov 1, 2001
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                        > Yesterdasy I talked with somebody, who knows quite a lot from this field
                        and
                        > he told me that "kor^enice" had origanally be just one type of wood only
                        and
                        > it was wood from tree (or was it a big shrub - I don't know) called in
                        Czech
                        > vr^esovec.
                        > Does any you know name of it in English?


                        It's the wood (smoking) pipes are made of, erica or bell-heather according
                        to one of my dictionaries, but I can't see anyone making veneer out of it
                        and using it to meake furniture.....

                        The idea of korenice meaning any veneer that looks like it's made of roots
                        makes more sense to me.....

                        Matej





                        >
                        > Sarka
                        > -----Original Message-----
                        > From: Michael [mailto:tritt002@...]
                        > Sent: Tuesday, October 30, 2001 9:37 PM
                        > To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
                        > Subject: [Czechlist] Re: TERM Korenice
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > "Bigleaf maple is locally significant in British Columbia for the
                        > manufacture of furniture, musical instruments, interior panelling,
                        > and other select uses such as large bowls turned from maple burls "
                        > http://www.for.gov.bc.ca/hfd/pubs/Docs/Mr/Mr090/Mr090-2.pdf
                        >
                        > "Clusters of round curls that grow into balls on the sides of trees,
                        > are known as burls. They are common in the big leaf maple of the west
                        > coast."
                        > http://www.thewoodbox.com/data/wood/mapleinfo.htm
                        >
                        > "Big leaf maple (Acer macrophyllum), also known as Pacific or Oregon
                        > maple, grows in the Pacific Northwest and is one of the softest of
                        > the maples. Maple burl has elegant and interesting swirled grain
                        > patterns, often combined with various forms of quilting and bird's
                        > eyes."
                        > http://tigerlilyworkshop.com/Woodcat/Wood-id.html
                        >
                        > "Hundreds of tons of burls from redwood, myrtlewood, madrone, and
                        > western maple are exported annually from Oregon to France and Italy."
                        > http://newton.dep.anl.gov/natbltn/600-699/nb629.htm
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > Czechlist: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Czechlist
                        > Post message: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
                        >
                        > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > Czechlist: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Czechlist
                        > Post message: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
                        >
                        > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                        >
                      • Jirka Bolech
                        ... heath Jirka Bolech
                        Message 11 of 13 , Nov 1, 2001
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                          > vr^esovec.
                          > Does any you know name of it in English?

                          heath

                          Jirka Bolech
                        • Simon Vaughan
                          ... Hmm. Yes, well, I ll try and do better next time I come to coin a Czech word. Simon
                          Message 12 of 13 , Nov 1, 2001
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                            > > By the way, Sarka, a space alone won't do to separate sentences.
                            >
                            > I am sorry Simon, I'do better next time.

                            Hmm. Yes, well, I'll try and do better next time I come to coin a Czech
                            word.

                            Simon
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