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FIGHT: Re: klaster

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  • JPKIRCHNER@aol.com
    I thought we needed a new designation for certain messages. ;-) ... It s seldom ever used in the US in that sense. It would be confusing, for reasons I ll
    Message 1 of 1 , Sep 4, 2001
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      I thought we needed a new designation for certain messages. ;-)

      In a message dated 9/4/01 9:34:42 AM, coilin.oconnor@... writes:

      >I am not trying to pick a fight :-) but I think "cloister" is totally fine
      >even in a modern English context, and I have heard it used quite frequently
      >in good old Catholic Ireland. It is a very handy word if you want to refer
      >to monasteries and convents in general or if you don' t know whether such
      >a building houses nuns or monks. It is also defined by the OED as "a convent
      >or monastery" without any reference being made to its having fallen out
      >of usage.

      It's seldom ever used in the US in that sense. It would be confusing, for
      reasons I'll mention below.

      >I think that sometimes in our desperation to avoid Czenglish, we
      >overcompensate and end up "dumbing down" our translations. We shouldn' t
      >underestimate the intelligence of our target readership. As a native
      >speaker, if I am reading a text on an area with which I am not familiar
      >and I find a word I don' t know, I am quite willing to look up an
      >English-English dictionary to find out what it means. After all, without
      >over 700,000 words in the English language one can't know them all.

      This was not a case of my dumbing down a translation for fear of it coming
      out in Czenglish. It was a case of my aiming for precision, and trying not
      to confuse intelligent readers with an imprecise term. The problem is that
      the term "cloister" commonly refers to a collection of cells within a
      convent, in which some nuns (i.e., "cloistered nuns") are secluded from
      contact with other people, even with other nuns. Not every nun in a convent
      is cloistered, and not every convent has "cloisters". And I seldom hear of
      monasteries that have cloisters, although I'm sure they exist. If you call a
      convent or a monastery a "cloister", many readers are liable to think that it
      contained cloistered religious, which is not always true. The term
      "cloister" is too imprecise to use, if there's a choice.

      Jamie
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